Skip to main content

Weekend January 18 & 19, 2014

January 20, 2014

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Lita
Cline
Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 16, 12 Pages
Weekend, January 18-19, 2014
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Service Directory
Classifeds
Community
Sports
Sports
Business
Menus
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
Your Local Weather
Fri
1/17
56/35
A mainly
sunny sky.
High 56F.
Winds W at
10 to 20 mph.
Sat
1/18
64/33
Sunny. Highs
in the mid
60s and lows
in the low
30s.
Sun
1/19
68/34
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
upper 60s
and lows in
the mid 30s.
Mon
1/20
60/29
Sunshine.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
upper 20s.
Tue
1/21
58/33
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
upper 50s
and lows in
the low 30s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
“Where there is not
community, trust, respect,
ethical behavior are diffcult
for the young to learn and for
the old to maintain.”
Robert K. Greenleaf
JC Cortez
Editor
editor@borgernewsherald.com
THE
IN 2014
TEMPERATURE
lowest
DROP YOUR ENTRIES BY THE
BORGER NEWS-HERALD AT
207 S. MAIN ST. OR E-MAIL TO
publisher@borgernewsherald.com
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL
SERVICE • INSTALLATION
502 W. Broadway
Fritch, Texas 79036
(806) 857-2553
audheatcool@cableone.net
LIC. #TACL-A0043529E
january
will be
SPONSORED BY
Entry
Box
Page
2
Offcials investigating
drug theft allegations at
Borger nursing facility
Senior Living Prop-
erties, LLC, the par-
ent company of Borger
Health Care Center at
1316 S. Florida is cur-
rently investigating pos-
sible drug thefts and
fraud perpetrated by an
employee of the compa-
ny’s Borger location.
Richard Agnew, Chief
General Counsel for Se-
nior Living Properties
LLC said in a phone in-
terview Thursday that
“We have heard ... alle-
gations and are working
with the State to investi-
gate.”
Agnew declined to
comment on the ongo-
ing investigation, but an
employee with Borger
Health Care Center told
the News-Herald that
company offcials are
concerned that an em-
ployee may have reflled
residents’ prescriptions
without permission and
pocketed the drugs.
Who would have even-
tually paid for the pills is
unclear. Agnew said that
it could be diffcult to
untangle, depending on
what patients would have
been affected, and how
the patients paid for care:
insurance, Medicare,
Medicaid or private-pay-
er care.
Upon receiving rumors
of the alleged crimes,
Senior Living Proper-
ties implemented several
control measures includ-
ing increased random
drug tests for employees
across all shifts, Agnew
said.
“This is done like it
is every time we have a
drug allegation,” stated
Agnew. “And not to say
that it never happens, but
it is a pretty rough road if
someone wants to go that
way with us.
“It is absolutely not
tolerated,” he continued,
“and the consequences
are swift.”
According to the cor-
porate website, Senior
Living Properties, LLC
owns and operates 34
“Skilled Nursing Facili-
ties” across Texas, in-
cluding Coronado Health
Care Center in Pampa
and locations as far away
as LaPorte and Carthage.
Captain Anthony Grif-
fn of the Borger Police
Department said Thurs-
day that no arrests have
been made in the case,
but said that the BPD is
currently working on a
case involving theft of
drugs.
Borger Healthcare Center at 1316 S. Florida in Borger. - Photo by JC Cortez
Scott Mills, AAMS
®
Financial Advisor
421 N. Deahl
Borger, Texas 79007
806-274-5475
Beverly Creacy, AAMS
®
Financial Advisor
811 S. Cedar
Borger, Texas 79007
806-274-2733
Brock Sherwood
Financial Advisor
1318 W. Wilson
Borger, Texas 79007
806-273-2634
Gary Schneck, CFP
Financial Advisor
905 N. Cedar
Borger, Texas 79007
806-274-7301
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2
Obituaries
Local Weather
We’ve got another dry and mild weekend on tap with less wind on Saturday and,
unfortunately, becoming windier on Sunday. Highs will be in the lower 60s Saturday,
then mid 60s on Sunday. Winds will blow at 10-20 mph on Saturday before increasing
to 20-30 mph Sunday.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Brian James
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Doris Modean (Moo Moo) Ferguson,
90, of Urband, Mo. passed away Wednesday, January 15,
2014.
Doris was born August 3, 1924 in Quanah TX .to James
Walters and Verdie Mavous (McNutt) Landers.
Mrs. Ferguson was president of Welcome Wagon, Sec-
retary of Welcome Wagon in Holbrook Arizona ,bowling
president in Holbrook, bowled on the housewife league on
Wednesday mornings in Borger Texas. Bowled in Page, Ari-
zona, and bowled in Holbrook, Arizona.
She married Willie Ferguson August 6,1938 in Quan-
na, TX. Mrs. Ferguson is preceded in death by her parents,
Walter and Verdi Landers ,her husband Willie D. Ferguson,
three sisters, Cela(Sis) Meadows, Patricia (Pat) Waldrip Josiphone(Jo) Purcell, four brothers,
Cleston Landers, Horace(Hoss) Landers James(Junior) Landers Jr. Billy ( Bubby) Landers,
two grandsons, Randy Wallace, Bill Reed ,two granddaughters, Shalana Lashell Terrell,
Doris Lou Ferguson, two great grandsons, Scott E. Neill IV ,Ronnie Wallace, one great- great
granddaughter Keelie Marie Neill ,one son-in-law, Ronald Wallace.
Survivors include her children Delois and husband Steve, Wollenberg, Urbana, Mo. Tom-
my and wife Danna Ferguson, Big Springs, TX, Carolyn and husband Jerry Pittelko of Roch-
ester, MN, Steve and wife Pam Ferguson of Borger, TX. nineteen grandchildren, Shanana,
Scott, Brad, Damon, Rance, Torri, Gene, Phil, Janet, Gary, Tanya, Craig, Brett, Steve, Sherry,
Sean, Shirley, Laura, and Chris, sixty-one great grandchildren, and forty-six great -great
grandchildren.
Viewing will be Brown Chapel of the Fountains, in Borger, Sunday January 19,2014 from
12:00 PM till 6:00 PM and Monday January 21,2014 from 8:00 AM till 8:00 PM.
Funeral services will be held at 11:00AM. Tuesday January 21, 2014 at Brown Chapel of
the Fountains. Burial will follow at Westlawn Memorial Park Cemetery.
Send personal condolences to www.brownfuneraldirectors.net.
Mattie Cox, 83, of Borger passed away on Wednes-
day, January 15, 2014 in Amarillo. Services will be 3:00 p.m.,
Saturday, January 18, at the Calvary Baptist Church in Borger,
with Dr. Jeff Hutchinson offciating. Burial will be at West-
lawn Memorial Park under the direction of Minton Chatwell
Funeral Directors.
Mattie was born on December 26, 1930, in Sentinel, Okla-
homa to Joseph and Mattie Bell Reed Trammell. She lived in
the Borger since 1948 where she was a member of the Calvary
Baptist Church. Mattie married Floyd Harold Cox on August
23, 1947 in Vernon. She loved church activities and her fam-
ily.
Mattie is preceded in death by her husband and a grand-
daughter, Amanda Gay Carder in 1995.
Survivors are her daughter, LaDonna Henshaw and husband L.W. of Arlington; sisters,
Lois Livergood of Borger and Neva Dorman of Sun City, AZ; grandchildren Cristin Leigh
Snell and husband Kyle, Sage Darlena Henshaw, Macy Aaron Henshaw, and Levi William
Henshaw; great-grandchildren Wakely Mae Henshaw, Carder Briane Snell, and Falon Joy
Lusty.
TSTA: Dewhurst ‘out of
touch’ with Texas teachers
In remarks to The Texas
Tribune, Lt. Gov. David De-
whurst demonstrated he is
out of touch with the needs
of Texas teachers, ignores
their fnancial reality and
doesn’t understand what ef-
fective classroom instruction
requires.
Dewhurst wrongly said
that the average teacher sal-
ary in Texas is “a little north
of (more than) $50,000” and,
when national cost-of-liv-
ing differences are factored
in, “Texas pays our school
teachers well above a 50 per-
cent median.”
“To David Dewhurst, a
teacher’s classroom may as
well be a foreign land,” said
Texas State Teachers Associ-
ation President Rita Haecker.
“Teachers are dedicated pro-
fessionals who work under
diffcult circumstances that
state leaders should try to
improve, not dismiss with in-
accurate statements designed
to cover up their failure to
provide for our children’s
classrooms.”
Dewhurst also suggested
the state may consider more
online instruction “so we can
give our children the best
education possible.”
“Technology is essential
in 21st century education,”
Haecker said. “But the heart
of a world-class education is
a classroom teacher who can
give students the individual
attention at the heart of the
learning experience.”
FACT CHECK:
The average teacher pay
in Texas for the 2012-13
school year, the most recent
data available, was $48,110
— more than $8,000 below
the national average.
Far from ranking in “the
median,” Texas ranked 38th
among the states and D.C. in
teacher pay.
The average Texas teach-
er pay dropped by $528 fol-
lowing the $5.4 billion in
school budget cuts imposed
by Dewhurst and the legisla-
tive majority during the 2011
session.
According to a Sam
Houston State University
survey commissioned by
TSTA last spring, the cost of
living in Texas cities is high
enough that 44 percent of
Texas teachers take second
jobs during the school year
to make ends meet, and the
average Texas teacher spends
$697 a year out of pocket for
school supplies because the
school fnance system is so
poorly funded.
The Brown Family would like to say Thank You to everyone for their prayers, phone calls,
fowers, cards, food, money, thoughtfulness and love during the loss of our loved ones...
Barry Brown & Nona Theryln Brown
Thank You to all of the churches for their prayers during Barry & Nona’s illnesses. We appreciate
Pastor Thompson who was so helpful and supportive to our family during the past year. A
special thank you to Pastor Martin and Bethel Church for all you’ve done. We would also like
to say Thank You to wonderful friends; Jerry and Vickie Norman, Buddie,
Nancy and Troy, Borger Booster Club. Thank You to Buttercup House,
Babyland and Fritch Daycare for all you did. We also had an anonymous donator. We wish we
knew who you were, so we could thank you personally. During our diffcult time, Marcy and
the rest of the Minton’s Staff were so helpful and kind. A special Thank You for guiding and
supporting us.
We miss you Barry & Nona very much but there is comfort in knowing you are in a better place
and not suffering anymore.
The Brown Family
Our mom, Frances Lavon (Pat) Cade
took her journey home January 16,2014, just shy of her 95th
birthday.
Mrs.Cade was preceded in death by her husband, Mr. Bob
Cade.
Mrs. Cade touched many lives with her giving nature and
warm heart and with a loving circle of family and friends her
memory will live on. Her fnal home was Heritage Skilled
Nursing and Rehab facility in Amarillo. We would like to
thank the special loving staff which treated her with such re-
spect and love throughout her stay. Also the kindness they
gave freely to us in her fnal days will always be remembered.
Mama, your recipes live on.
She loved and was loved by many.
Survivors include One son Doyle and wife Martha Mobley of Amarillo,Texas. One daugh-
ter Sandy and husband Ernie Martinez of Denver, Colorado. Many Grandchildren Great-
Grandchildren and Great-Great Grandchildren.
Funeral services will be in her church of many years. Gateway Baptist Church Monday at
2:00 PM with Pastor Chris Rawlinson. Burial will be at Westlawn Memorial Park Cemetery
Viewing will be at Brown Chapel in Fritch on Wednesday, January 15, 2013 and Thursday,
January 16, 2013 from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Send personal condolences to www.brownfuneraldirectors.net.
Engagements
Victoria Renee Noonan and Jory Castleberry
David and Danielle Watson of Borger and Mark Noonan of Amarillo are pleased to announce
the engagement of their daughter, Victoria Renee Noonan, of Borger, to Jory Castleberry, son of
Jim and Chum Castleberry, of Borger.
Victoria is a graduate of Borger High School and is currently attending Clarendon College.
Jory graduated from Borger High School and is currently employed with the City of Borger.
The wedding is planned for March at Southside Baptist Church in Borger.
For Tickets or Questions Call 806-274-8553
Seats 8 People
RSVP Now...Seating Limited
If anyone would like to donate at the auction or would like to donate to a single child this year, please call 806-274-8553 for more information.
January 24
HCJLA Livestock Show
at Borger’s Aluminum
Dome
8:00am Concession Stand
Opens
8:45am Opening Flag
Ceremony
Livestock events all day
long
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100
S. Hedgecoke, Borger. Call
273-5621 or 857-3947 for
more information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian
Church, 200 S. Bryan, 6
p.m. Call 806-382-2449
or 806-273-6017 for more
information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist
Church Borger Fellowship
Hall 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. child care is provided.
Call FBC 263-5621 for
information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medi-
cal Field Employees in
Hutchinson County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College
Cafeteria in the Gallery
Room For more informa-
tion call Aileen Jackson at
274-9890or Betty Jordon at
857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Pres-
byterian Church, 418 W.
Coolidge, 8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more
information.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100
S. Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, sec-
ond foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6
p.m.
Tuesdays
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for
life challenges, 6:30 p.m.,
That One Place Commu-
nity Center, 212 E. Broad-
way, Fritch. Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria
Call 274-3321 for more
information.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9
a.m. Call 886-0299 for
more information.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stin-
nett Senior Citizen Build-
ing, 6:30 p.m. Call 878-
2960 or 878-3272 for more
information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Minis-
try, 7 p.m. Call 857-3975
for location.
Alibates Creek Indian
Dancers, 7 p.m., Trinity
Lutheran Church, 212 W.
Jefferson. Call 274-3239
for more information.
VFW Post #1789 meets at
the VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden
Plains Community Hos-
pital Board Room, 1 p.m.
Call 467-5732 for more
information.
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure and blood sugar
screenings, Opportunities
Center, 11 a.m. to noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce,
6:30 p.m. Call 806-878-
4026.
Vietnam Veterans of
America Chapter 404, 403
S Cornell in Fritch, 5:30
p.m. dinner and 6:00 meet-
ings. Call 857-3950 for
more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure screenings, MAL’S
Café, Stinnett, 8 a.m. to 9
a.m.
Phillips Alumni Associa-
tion, Frank Phillips Col-
lege Gallery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post
0671 meets at 7:30 pm
at the American Legion
post next to the Aluminum
Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospi-
tal Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art
10:30-12 St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s wel-
come, Doors open 5 pm,
Cards sold starting at 6
p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm,
$14 each packet of 13
games or 6 papers for each
of 13 games,
Additional papers half
packets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more
information.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge,
7:30 p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost
Children Grief Support
Group, New U on Main
Street, 7 p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more
information.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Second Thursdays
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen
Sunshine Club, 12 noon for
lunch followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m., 305 N. Deahl. Call
273-7127 or see fellow-
shipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure and blood sugar
screenings, Fritch Sunshine
Club, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Menno-
nite Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
United Supermarket, 9
a.m. to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class,
10 a.m., Golden Plains
Community Hospital
Board Room. Call 467-
5718 or 467-5857 for more
information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Call 878-2597 for
more information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor
Home Owners Assoc., 10
a.m., Club House.
Marine Corps League
Hawthorne Det. #1349,
9 a.m., 421 E. Broadway,
Stinnett.
Young adults Christian
marriage class, Word
of Life Church, 9:45
a.m.Sundays, Wednesdays,
Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcot-
ics Anonymous, Valley
Drive west entrance, Cedar
Street, 7:30 p.m. Call 806-
570-2028 or 857-4038 for
more information
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
WEEKEND,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014 Borger News- Herald
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
NEW Dual Action
Concealer
helps faws disappear
with the touch of a
wand! It’s loaded with
optical diffusers plus
anit-aging ingredients.
This means you can
hide imperfections
and help prevent
them from returning.
Recipe of the Day
A new year marks a great time to turn over
a new leaf. While many people resolve to be
healthier in a new year, those who aren’t fond
of making resolutions can still make an effort
to adopt a healthier lifestyle.
Adopting a healthier diet is a great way
to improve overall health. And while it’s of-
ten assumed that a healthy diet is one void of
taste, the following recipe for “Chicken and
Curried Caulifower Salad Sandwiches” from
Joy Manning and Tara Mataraza Desmond’s
“Almost Meatless: Recipes That Are Better
for Your Health and the Planet” (Ten Speed
Press) turns such a notion on its head.
Chicken and Curried Caulifower Salad
Sandwiches
Serves 4 to 6
1 medium head caulifower, chopped
into 2-inch pieces (about 6 cups)
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon canola
oil
1 teaspoon hot curry powder
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pep-
per
1 1-pound bone-in, skin-on chicken
breast
1 egg yolk
11/2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
1/8 teaspoon salt
3 grinds black pepper
1/4 teaspoon mustard
1/2 cup canola oil
2 scallions, white and green parts,
sliced very thin
1/2 teaspoon hot curry powder
2 tablespoons grated onion
1/3 cup salted roasted cashews, coarsely
chopped
1/3 cup golden raisins
Toasted slices rye, pumpernickel or other
brown bread
Mayonnaise
To prepare the caulifower and chicken,
arrange 2 racks in the oven and preheat to
400 F. Toss the caulifower with the 1 table-
spoon of oil, curry powder and 1/4 teaspoon
salt in a bowl, and arrange in a single layer
on a rimmed baking sheet or in a glass baking
dish. Put the chicken in a roasting pan or on a
rimmed baking sheet, brush with the remain-
ing 1 teaspoon of oil and season with salt
and pepper. Transfer both to the oven, one on
each rack. Roast the caulifower for 20 min-
utes. Remove from the oven and let cool. Let
the chicken roast for an additional 10 to 15
minutes (30 to 35 minutes total), until a meat
thermometer registers 160 F. Remove from
the oven and cool.
To make the mayonnaise, whisk the egg
yolk with the vinegar, salt, pepper, and mus-
tard in a bowl. When well combined, begin
adding the oil very slowly, a few drops at
a time, until about a quarter of the oil has
formed a smooth emulsion with the yolk. Add
the remaining oil in a slow, steady stream,
whisking constantly. To this half-cup of basic
mayo, add the scallions, curry powder and the
grated onion. Taste for seasoning and adjust
as needed, and refrigerate until ready to use.
To prepare and serve the salad, when the
chicken is cool, remove and discard the skin,
cut the meat from the bone, and dice it into
1/2-inch pieces. Give the caulifower a rough
chop so the pieces are no more than 1/2 inch.
In a large bowl, combine the chicken, cauli-
fower, mayo, cashews, and raisins and toss
until well mixed. Taste for seasoning, adding
more salt, pepper or curry if you like. Scoop
the salad onto toasted bread and enjoy.
Start the year off on a health kick
3A
Do YOU have a recipe that you’d like to see
featured in our “Recipe of the Day” section?
Drop your submissions by the Borger News
Herald at 2nd and Main, or e-mail them to
Feature@borgernewsherald.com
WEEKEND,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014 Borger News- Herald
4A
TODAY IN HISTORY
1607 – San Agustin
Church in Manila is offcial-
ly completed; it is the oldest
church still standing in the
Philippines.
1812 – Peninsular War:
After a ten-day siege, Arthur
Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wel-
lington, orders British sol-
diers of the Light and third
divisions to storm Ciudad
Rodrigo.
1817 – An army of 5,423
soldiers, led by General José
de San Martín, crosses the
Andes from Argentina to lib-
erate Chile and then Peru.
1829 – Johann Wolfgang
von Goethe’s Faust Part 1
receives its premiere perfor-
mance.
1839 – The British East
India Company captures
Aden.
1840 – Captain Charles
Wilkes circumnavigates Ant-
arctica, claiming what be-
came known as Wilkes Land
for the United States.
1861 – American Civil
War: Georgia joins South
Carolina, Florida, Mississip-
pi, and Alabama in seceding
from the United States.
1862 – American Civil
War: Battle of Mill Springs
– The Confederacy suffers its
frst signifcant defeat in the
confict.
1883 – The frst electric
lighting system employ-
ing overhead wires, built by
Thomas Edison, begins ser-
vice at Roselle, New Jersey.
1893 – Henrik Ibsen’s play
The Master Builder receives
its premiere performance in
Berlin.
1899 – Anglo-Egyptian
Sudan is formed.
1915 – Georges Claude
patents the neon discharge
tube for use in advertising.
1915 – World War I: Ger-
man zeppelins bomb the towns
of Great Yarmouth and King’s
Lynn in the United Kingdom
killing more than 20, in the
frst major aerial bombard-
ment of a civilian target.
1917 – Silvertown explo-
sion: 73 are killed and 400
injured in an explosion in a
munitions plant in London.
1920 – The United States
Senate votes against joining
the League of Nations.
1935 – Coopers Inc. sells
the world’s frst briefs.
1942 – World War II: Japa-
nese forces invade Burma
1945 – World War II: So-
viet forces liberate the Łódź
ghetto. Of more than 200,000
inhabitants in 1940, less than
900 had survived the Nazi oc-
cupation.
1946 – General Douglas
MacArthur establishes the In-
ternational Military Tribunal
for the Far East in Tokyo to try
Japanese war criminals.
1949 – Cuba recognizes
Israel.
1953 – 71.7% of all televi-
sion sets in the United States
are tuned into I Love Lucy to
watch Lucy give birth.
1960 – Japan and the Unit-
ed States sign the US-Japan
Mutual Security Treaty
1977 – Snow falls in Mi-
ami, Florida. This is the only
time in the history of the city
that snow has fallen. It also fell
in the Bahamas.
1978 – The last Volkswa-
gen Beetle made in Germany
leaves VW’s plant in Emden.
Beetle production in Latin
America continues until 2003.
1983 – The Apple Lisa,
the frst commercial personal
computer from Apple Inc. to
have a graphical user interface
and a computer mouse, is an-
nounced.
1986 – The frst IBM PC
computer virus is released into
the wild. A boot sector virus
dubbed (c)Brain, it was creat-
ed by the Farooq Alvi Brothers
in Lahore, Pakistan, reportedly
to deter piracy of the software
they had written.
1991 – Gulf War: Iraq fres
a second Scud missile into Is-
rael, causing 15 injuries.
1993 – Czech Republic
and Slovakia join the United
Nations.
1995 – After being struck
by lightning the crew are
forced to ditch Bristow Flight
56C. All 18 aboard are later
rescued.
1996 – The barge North
Cape oil spill occurs as an
engine fre forces the tugboat
Scandia ashore on Moonstone
Beach in South Kingstown,
Rhode Island.
1997 – Yasser Arafat re-
turns to Hebron after more
than 30 years and joins cel-
ebrations over the handover of
the last Israeli-controlled West
Bank city.
2006 – The New Horizons
probe is launched by NASA
on the frst mission to Pluto.
2007 – Turkish Journalist
Hrant Dink is assassinated in
front of his newspaper’s offce
by 17-year-old Turkish ultra-
nationalist Ogün Samast.
2012 – The Hong Kong-
based fle-sharing website
Megaupload is shut down by
the FBI.
Letters to the Editor
Opinion
The photo was rivet-
ing. A laughing Johnny
Ray Watson with his head
thrown back in the recliner
was holding a giggling lit-
tle toddler, Caleb Tate. The
picture was at least twenty
years old. Johnny Ray be-
came “Uncle Johnny” to
little Caleb and his parents
became Johnny’s ‘vanilla’
family. Years slipped by and
Caleb grew up and Johnny
grew old.
Johnny Ray is a 6’ 7”,
240 lb. former basketball
player, gospel singer par
excellence on a world wide
stage, singing for Billy Gra-
ham Crusades and melting
hearts all over the country.
When a knee injury ended
his basketball career Johnny
Ray faced deep bitterness
and reacted with a destruc-
tive lifestyle. But return-
ing home to Lorenzo and
performing with his family
band in churches brought
him back to the arms of the
One who loved him best.
Over time while diligently
serving the Lord, Johnny
developed Type II diabetes
that threatened to end his
singing career. His feet lost
sensation and his eyes lost
their acuity. Disappoint-
ment swallowed him up
when dialysis commanded
his days. He was only 62.
The doctors told him,
“You need a kidney trans-
plant. But there is a three to
fve year wait.” Not good.
We were praying, hoping,
wishing we could personal-
ly change things for Johnny
Ray. Though he may not
remember it, this beautiful
man of God fgures heavily
in our lives.
It was the Denim Fes-
tival Gospel Concert in Lit-
tlefeld, Texas in the fall of
1995 where Ted and I frst
met. Johnny Ray, the star
performer, was a long time
acquaintance of Ted’s. I
was one of the ‘others’ that
would share the stage with
Johnny Ray. In fact, Ted’s
congregation at Amherst
United Methodist Church
spearheaded the purchase
of a motor home for Johnny
Ray to be with his fam-
ily while doing evangelism.
So the Sunday night service
was dismissed and the con-
gregation joyfully joined
the crowd in Littlefeld.
Fred Goldsmith our long-
time ministry partner on
the radio was the organizer
and emcee. He introduced
me to the audience which
included Ted and several
of his congregation. Five
years later Ted and I were
married.
I remember Ted and
I sitting in the audience
several years ago at Christ-
mas time in the Civic Cen-
ter Auditorium in Lubbock
when Johnny Ray came on
stage and remarked with his
teeth refecting brilliantly
through his engaging smile,
“Don’t Jesus look good in
black.” The last time Ted
saw Johnny Ray was at St.
Stephens in Amarillo, some
two years ago. Even with
his physical limitations, he
exuded the joy of the Lord
and sang with his vibrant,
beautiful, God glorifying
voice.
From time to time we
would get a report on John-
ny Ray’s health situation. A
kidney transplant….that’s a
rough one. But God had
not forgotten Johnny Ray’s
prayers. By that time Ca-
leb Tate was at A&M in
the Corp of Cadets, robust
and full of life and promise.
Caleb was deeply moved
by “Uncle Johnny’s” need.
He told his parents, “I want
to give a kidney to Uncle
Johnny. I have two, I only
need one.”
His parents, Rob and
Darlene tried to reason with
him. “That may affect your
military career. You need to
give it some thought.” But
Caleb was resolved. “Well,
for the moment at least sign
the donor line on your driv-
ers license.” Caleb kissed
his family goodbye, hugged
the dog and jumped on his
Victory motorcycle for the
47-mile trip back to College
Station.
It was a freaky thing.
A driver turned left in front
of Caleb. Caleb struck the
side of the car. He wasn’t
wearing a helmet. For him
it was over. The doctor’s
declared him brain dead.
When his parents checked
his license Caleb had failed
to sign the donor line. But
Rob and Darlene had not
forgotten his fervent desire.
They called Johnny Ray.
At frst Johnny Ray
could not accept the offer.
It felt wrong. Caleb was
young and had his whole
life before him….John-
ny Ray was old and life
seemed to be ebbing away.
But the Tates told Johnny
Ray, “That was all Caleb
talked about….giving you
a kidney.” They would not
take no for an answer.
The doctors doubt-
ed the kidney would be a
match, one chance in a mil-
lion. Caleb’s kidney was
more than compatible. The
match was absolutely per-
fect. At least six lives were
changed through Caleb’s
donated organs. And every
time Johnny Ray goes to
the bathroom he says, “Ca-
leb says it is time to pee.”
And that kidney so lovingly
given is fushing out the
toxins bringing Uncle John-
ny new life. Caleb would
be pleased.
None of us could have
known that the giggling lit-
tle toddler held up in the air
by huge black hands twenty
years ago would become
the source of life for the
‘uncle’ that taught him foot-
work and basketball tech-
niques. The unseen hand
and heart of God had heard
the prayers of two men, one
young, one old, one budding
with promise, one bending
with age and He answered
both. Johnny Ray says now
when he sings, Caleb sings
with him.
The Answer Came
Why you should subscribe to the Borger News Herald:
* New Doctor’s Column
* New layout
* New columnist - Randy Ray, Don Newbury,
Jaimee Coburn, Janice “Nana” Bambalere
* New Staff
* Smile of the Day
* More local content
207 N. Main, Borger, Texas
Telephone: (806) 273-5611
Fax: (806) 273-2552
www.borgernewsherald.com
Publisher: Stephanie Hooper
Editor: JC Cortez
Production Manager: Joe Jones
Feature Reporter: Nathan Blankenship
Subscription Rates:
$8.50 per month for home delivery
$17.50 per month by mail
Daily: 50¢
Sunday: 75¢
2012
I want to express my deepest appreciation and say
“Thank you,” to the offcers of the Borger Police Depart-
ment, Police Honor Guard, Hutchinson County Sheriff and
the local Texas Highway Patrol.
The honors they bestowed on their Chief Jerry Poston
were not only compassionate but will have an everlasting
memory. These offcers gave of their time and their hearts.
They were loyal and honorable when Jerry began his jour-
ney with them and they continued until Jerry’s journey was
fnished.
So many times we forget our law enforcement offcers
but they never forget us. I truly commend each offcer for
the service and protection given to the community and law
enforcement as a whole and to their family members for
their commitments.
May God continue to protect you in all that you do.
Sincerely,
Belinda Britain-Poston and family
Janice Bambalere
Nana’s Place
Jody Wilson
Jody’s Journal
Doctors, hospitals,
techs, needles, tests. Some-
times I get so wrapped up
in “things” I forget about
what’s important. Let’s
take last Thursday. I had an
important doctors appoint-
ment and I couldn’t get
there on time. My transpor-
tation was going to be many
hours earlier so I snuggled
down at a McDonald’s with
a cup of free coffee (until
the 19th) and my Kindall,
grateful to be out of the
cold wind.
Two tables down from
me was a man who was
either homeless, at worse,
or at the least, very much
down on his luck. He had
long, curly unwashed hair
and a long coat that was also
obviously unwashed. As he
nursed his coffee, he talked
to himself, low mumbling
words that only he under-
stood. He didn’t bother
me. I’ve always wondered
what a person has to go
through to get to a place
like that. Surely someone
loves and misses him some-
where. While I tried to get
back to what I was doing, I
heard a soft girls voice ask-
ing another employee to
make her a sausage biscuit.
This is important because
there were several voices
and none of them stood
out. A few minutes later I
heard the same voice asking
the man if he was hungry.
She told him that someone
changed their order and she
thought he might be able to
use it. She also offered a
refll on his coffee. I didn’t
look up. If she wanted to
preserve whatever dignity
he had left, I wasn’t go-
ing to stare it away. There
was a store nearby, and it
fnally opened, so I gath-
ered my stuff and started
off to “window shop” as
my grandmother used to
call it. I started for the door
and the man jumped up and
opened the door for me. My
normal response is “thank
you, kind sir”, and after a
second I reverted to what
I know best. He fashed
me the biggest smile and
said “you’re very welcome
madam”. Yes, I’m sure of
it, someone, somewhere has
to love this man.
I left the McDonald’s
full of jumbled feelings. I
felt ashamed, because I saw
someone obviously in need
and sat there doing noth-
ing. And while my medi-
cal needs overwhelm me
at times, there are always
going to be those who have
needs greater then mine. I
fnd that I become bored
thinking about my needs all
the time. I do realize that
I need to think about deci-
sions and choices I have,
but to spend so much time
on it, that you don’t see
what’s happening in the
lives of the people around
me, that’s too much.
To the young woman
who gave him the sausage
biscuit, I know McDon-
ald’s doesn’t pay a lot. I
also know a sausage biscuit
only costs about a dollar.
It’s not how much it costs
or how much you make, it’s
your heart. I don’t know
if you’ve done that before,
but your heart was evident
that morning and put me to
shame.
By the way, I want to
tell you about our transit
system. It has helped me
more then I can tell you.
Living in a rural area, in an
electric wheelchair, I have
few options if our van is un-
available. Since I’ve been
using the transit, it seems
to me like it’s growing by
leaps and bounds. I always
get the same driver, Gina,
who is kind to her clientele
and somehow stays on time.
What a woman!
You can contact Janice
at nanas_place@hotmail.
com
Nana’s Place
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
You have excellent ideas about
introducing improvements at
work, especially in cost-cutting.
Similarly, you might have good
ideas about improving your own
health.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
You can make creative
headway by stripping something
down to the bare necessities and
fguring out how to rebuild it
again. Sometimes that’s the only
way to go.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Discussions with family
members will be powerful today.
This is also a good day to get
rid of garbage and focus on
recycling and organizing laundry
and bathroom areas.
CANCER (June 21 to July
22) Your communication with
others is powerful today. In
part, this is because you see
the subtext to everything. You
know what’s going on behind the
scenes.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Trust your ability to see
new uses for something you
already own. Your mind is very
resourceful today. You might
apply this as well to discovering
new ways of earning money.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Take a realistic look in the
mirror and ask yourself what you
can do to improve your image.
Whether it’s fair or not, we are
all judged by our appearance.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Your research abilities are
excellent today. If you’re looking
for solutions or answers, press
on, because you likely will be
successful. Nothing will escape
your scrutiny.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov.
21) A discussion with a female
might be a powerful exchange
for you today. It appears
somebody wants to put his or
her cards on the table. Perhaps
it is you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21) You might take a new
approach in how you want to
impress authority fgures today.
This could be because they seem
to know more about you than
you thought. (Yikes.)
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22 to Jan. 19) Discussions
about politics, religion and
philosophical issues will be
deep and profound today. You
don’t want to skim along on the
surface of things. You want the
nitty-gritty truth.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to
Feb. 18) Now is a good time to
decide how to divide something
or deal with shared property,
inheritances and insurance
matters. You’ll get right to the
pertinent facts of the issue.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) You might be obsessed
about something today,
especially talking to partners
and close friends. You also
feel passionate about intimate
relationships.
WEEKEND,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014
Borger News- Herald
Comics 5A
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
h
e
W
a
t
e
r
H
e
a
t
e
r
B
a
r
g
a
i
n
H
o
u
s
e
HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
C
a
r
t
e
r

s
T
r
e
e
S
e
r
v
i
c
e
Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
Locally Owned & Operated
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
K

s
MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
BORGER NEWS-HERALD service directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Heather or Kristie at 273-5611
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Discounts for single
parents & the elderly.
“Let’s Get Clean”
{BIODEGRADABLE PRODUCTS ONLY}
L
D
N
C
L
E
A
N
I
N
G
8
0
6
.2
7
4
.1
8
4
0
Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
NEW BUSINESS NEW BUSINESS
WT Vapors
722 Weatherly
Borger • 806-274-8874
westtexasvapors@yahoo.com
OPENING FRIDAY
NOVEMBER 1ST
GRAND OPENING
NOVEMBER 2ND
10-2 PM
Tuesday-Friday 10-6
Saturday 9-3
Closed Sunday & Monday
All E-Cig Accessories
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
T
H
E
BO
D
Y
Shop
109 S. Main
Borger
806-274-3474
BODY SHOP
Breedlove’s
Auto FX
806-567-6967
Full Auto Detailing
319 Weatherly
AUTO DETAILING
TATTOOS CLEANING AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
J&D Remodeling
• Tile • Drywal
• Paint (Inside/Out)
• Wod Flor
Refinishing
& Much More..
Free Estimates Call
David at 806-275-0841
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
REMODELING CAREGIVERS
JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
R
o
o
f
n
g
, C
o
n
c
r
e
te
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
o
r
k
,
F
lo
o
r
in
g
a
n
d
m
o
r
e
..
C
a
ll fo
r
y
o
u
r
e
s
t
im
a
t
e
t
o
d
a
y
!
(8
0
6
) 2
4
0
-
1
7
9
6
V
E
R
D
E
C
O
N
S
T
R
U
C
T
I
O
N
CONCRETE CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
$99.00 Security
Deposit
No Application Fee
Month of January
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
2 & 3 Bedrooms
Available!
806-273-2766
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
DEAR ABBY: When my
husband died, he didn’t have
a lot of possessions. He died
without a will, so what little
he had is now with me. My
problem is my mother-in-
law keeps asking that I return
things she gave him.
I wouldn’t mind if she has
them, but she has been giv-
ing them to his children, who
hated him and were rude and
disrespectful. They neither
called nor came to see him
during his long illness. They
didn’t even bother to come to
his funeral.
I feel they want his things
only because they think they
might be of some value, not
out of any respect or affec-
tion. My kids showed him
more respect and love than
his own did, and I’d rather
they have his things.
Should I be honest and
tell my mother-in-law why I
won’t give her any more of
his possessions? I just don’t
know what to do. -- OKLA-
HOMA WIDOW
DEAR WIDOW: It’s sad
that your stepchildren ignored
their father during his illness
and chose to skip his funeral.
Be sure to point that out when
you tell your former mother-
in-law you have other plans
for the items. She may not
like hearing it, but once a gift
is given, it belongs to the re-
cipient. And because her son
died without a will, the recipi-
ent is you, his widow.
DEAR ABBY: I recently
started a new job. One of the
management individuals has
taken a strong interest in me.
He keeps doing favors for me
that beneft me fnancially and
I appreciate it. (I have never
asked him to do this.)
I have always been courte-
ous and took his gestures as
a sign of kindness. But now
he has started complimenting
me and talking about things
that go way beyond conversa-
tion. It’s making me uncom-
fortable.
We have gone out on two
friendly lunches before, and
he is a genuine, kind, edu-
cated, wonderful man. He
would be a great catch, but
the problem is he is extremely
overweight. I am emotionally
attracted to him, but physical-
ly repelled. I can’t wait years
for him to lose the weight,
but he is taking my kindness
as a possible show of inter-
est. Have you any advice that
could help end his attraction,
but continue the business ad-
vice he provides for me? -- IN
A SPOT IN TAMPA
DEAR IN A SPOT: When
the man compliments you
about anything that isn’t
work-connected, tell him that
when he does it, it makes you
uncomfortable. And when he
raises topics that aren’t busi-
ness-related, steer the con-
versation right back where it
belongs. He may be a kind,
genuine, educated, wonder-
ful person, but if he persists,
it could be considered harass-
ment.
DEAR ABBY: I am part of
a group of neighbors who of-
ten go out to dinner together.
However, one woman often
talks loudly on her cellphone
at the dinner table, and it
makes the rest of us feel un-
comfortable and insignifcant.
It has gotten so bad we have
stopped inviting her.
I feel sorry for her and
wonder if I should explain the
reason she’s being excluded.
What is the best way to han-
dle this dilemma? -- FRIEND
IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD
DEAR FRIEND: If done
discreetly and kindly, it might
beneft the woman to know
why she’s no longer included.
Frankly, you’d be doing her
a favor because her behavior
was rude.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los An-
geles, CA 90069.
For an excellent guide to
becoming a better conversa-
tionalist and a more sociable
person, order “How to Be
Popular.” Send your name
and mailing address, plus
check or money order for $7
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-
0447. (Shipping and handling
are included in the price.)
Kids who skip dad’s funeral
are happy to claim his things
Dear Abby
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
CA$H FOR cars/trucks:
Get A Top Dol l ar IN-
STANT Offer! Runni ng or
Not.. Damaged?
Wrecked? OK! We Pay Up
To $20,000! Call Toll Free:
1-800-871-8712
USED CARS/TRUCKS
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
FSBO!
610 BROWN IN Stinnett.
Starter home in good
shape.
2bdrm/1bath. Carpet
throughout, except in 1
bedroom and kitchen.
1,000sqft. 6ft wooden
fence. Paved Street, Cur-
bed, Gutter. On 3 Lots.
8 blocks from school!
Call (806)886-1150
420 OTHER CITIES PROP.
1415 PRIMROSE - Updat-
ed 3bd/2ba home i n great
nei ghborhood! $122,900.
806-223-7828
410 CITY PROPERTY
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
i n thi s newspaper i s sub-
j ect to the federal fai r
housi ng act of 1968
whi ch makes i t i l l egal to
adverti se “any prefer-
ence, l i mi tati on or di s-
cri mi nati on based on
race, col or, rel i gi on,
handi cap, fami l y status,
sex or nati onal ori gi n, or
an i ntenti on to make any
such preference, l i mi ta-
tion or discrimination.”
Thi s newspaper wi l l not
knowingly accept any ad-
verti si ng for real estate
which is in violation of the
l aw. Our readers are
hereby i nformed that al l
dwel l i ngs adverti sed i n
thi s newspaper are avai l -
able on an equal opportu-
nity basis.
340 APART. RENTALS
2BDRM 120 DAVEN-
PORT. APPLIANCES i n-
cluded.$475/Month.
$400/Deposi t. No Dogs.
Cal l (806)274-6147 after
3pm
208 N. RIDGELAND,
FRITCH, 3 br., 1 ba. 806-
665-4595 TruStar RE
203 ABILENE 3BDRM
1BATH C/H/A. No Pets.
$700/month +Deposi t.
(806)898-2058
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
118 W.OCLA.
3BDRM/1BATH-REMOD-
ELED. SPRINKLER Sys-
tem, New Appl i ances,
Fenced Yard.
(806)273-3982
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
LOOKIG TO buy Junk Ve-
hi cl es w/Ti tl es. Wi l l Pay
Cash. (806)886-0005
290 MISC. WANTED
2 RECLINERS, 32” TV. All
in good condition. 806-274-
9202
230 MISC. FOR SALE
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FROM HOME. 6-8 weeks.
ACCREDITED. Get a Di -
pl oma. Get a Job! No
Computer Needed. FREE
Brochure. 1-800-264-8330.
Benj ami n Frankl i n Hi gh
School www.di pl omafrom-
home.com
130 EDUCATIONAL
WILL WORK AROUND
HOUSE. Wel di ng or Car-
pentry (806)595-0285
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
i ng, anythi ng you want
done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
NEW TO AREA!!!
AVON Representative,
ready to serve new
customers!!!
Please contact me at
(806)279-2298 or visit me
online at:
www.youravon.com/hacha-
vez
110 WORK WANTED
090 HELP WANTED
ESTATE SALE 1106
BRENNAN, Fri tch, Tx
Across from Hi gh School .
Enti re Househol d Every-
thi ng Goes!! Saturday &
Sunday 8-??
020 GARAGE SALE
DISH TV Retai l er. Starti ng
at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) Broadband Internet
starti ng $14.95/month
(where avai l abl e). Ask
about SAME DAY Instal l a-
ti on! CALL Now! 1-800-
593-2572
010 SPECIAL
PUBLIC NOTICE
GET NEW APPLIANCES
FOR CHRISTMAS?
We’ll help you sell the old ones!
Place your items to sell in the Borger
News-Herald classifieds.
To place an ad call Jaime at (806) 273-5611
$27.
00
FOR
6 DAYS
REGULAR LINE AD 10 WORDS WITH ATTENTION GETTER
CENTRAL STATION
APARTMENTS
700 S. MCGEE
Now Available To Rent!!
806-273-5557
DAKE’S
RESTAURANT
& LOTS
Main St. - Borger
Call REC
806-273-5557
WIND TECHNICIAN
Miami, TX
Primary responsibilities include
performing maintenance and
technical support for the Miami
Energy Center, a 288 MW wind
power generation facility.
Qualifications: 1 year of technical
experience (mechanical, electrical,
I&C, etc.) and/or education in a
related discipline; ability to work
outdoors in inclement weather, climb
ladders without assistance, work
at heights greater than 250 ft. and
manipulate up 100 lbs.
For a complete position description
please visit the Career Opportunities
section of our website at www.
invenergyllc.com. Send resume
with salary history to resume@
invenergyllc.com. Reference: Wind
Technician – Miami.
United Supermarkets #539, located at
1414 West Wilson, in Borger, is
seeking a Full-time
Floral Department Manager
This position requires that you work 40
hours per week and have the flexibility to
work various shifts throughout the week.
United rewards its team members
with weekly pay, flexible schedules, a
comprehensive benefits plan and a positive
working environment.
If you are interested in these positions,
apply online at
www.unitedtexas.com/careers.
EOE. Select Job Number 0133Y
Always Happy To Help
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
�� �� ������� ������� �� � ������������
��������� ��������� ����� � ���� ������� �������
��� ��� �������� ��������� ������� ������� �����
���������� ��� ���� ���� ����
�� ����� ����������� ��������� ���� ���� � �������
���� ���������� �������������� ���� ��������� ���������
Therapist Tech V - $11.63/hr -
ASCI Borger
���� �������� ���������� ����� ��� ��������
����������� ��� ����������� ���� �������������
�������������
Therapist Tech I - $9.07/hr – Group Home
������ ���� �� ������� ���� �������������
������������ �� � ��� ������������ ��������
The Plemons Stinnett Phillips CISD is
accepting applications for
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS.
Applicants must have or be able to
obtain a Class B CDL, attend a 20 hour
certification class, pass Drug and Alcohol
testing, and pass an annual physical.
Applications may be obtained at the
school district central office at 603 Main
Street in Stinnett Texas, or on the school’s
website:www.pspcisd.net Position to be
filled as soon as possible.
Contact Greg Drennan,
Maint./Trans Director @ 886-2572 for
more information. PSPCISD is an equal
opportunity employer.
DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
In Borger! Texas
St. Apartments.
2 bed., 1 bath.
Available Now!
806-341-7170
B&L Body Shop is
looking for an
EXPERIENCED
PAINTER
Apply in person 400
S. Harvey, Borger.
Pan-Cor Construction in
Panhandle is currently
hiring for a:
TRUCK DRIVER & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR.
Class A CDL Required.
Call (806)382-2766
Mature part-time
Nursery Worker
needed.
Please call
Lynn at
683-7929
TAX SERVICE
Glenda
Brownlee
628 Whittenburg
274-2142
T-TOPS & Set
of 4 Tires &
Rims
98’ Trans Am
806-395-1565
Borger Junior College District,
dba Frank Phillips College, is
seeking a request for proposal
(RFP) from 0PA Nrms to
provide professional services
for the year ending August 31,
2014. To request information
regarding the proposal, please
contact Debra Wells, Executive
Assistant, at 806-457-4244 or
by e-mail at
dwells@fpctx.edu.
I am looking for...
A professional person to represent Farm Bureau
Insurance Companies in Hutchinson County.
The person I seek is most likely currently
employed but experienced job dissatisfaction and
is ready to take control of their career.
The position I have available offers:
� �������� ����� �������
� �������� ������� ����
� ���������� �������� �������
� ������� ����� ���� ������
��������� ��� ���� ��������� ����������
Send your resume to: mcook@txfb-ins.com
Full Time CDL-A-X Crude Oil
Transport Drivers Needed
Pampa, Perryton, Borger,
Wheeler, Canadian
Local Hauling-Home Daily, Weekly Paycheck
Paid Orientation/Training, Vacation,
401K, Life, Medical, Dental, Vision
Minimum of 12 months T/T or
Tanker experience required
Call Lori Hernandez 800/737-9981
or visit us online at www.MIPE.com
North Park
Apts.
1&2 BDR.
Apts.
Call 274-8431
Full Brokerage
Coverage
806-273-5557
For all your Real
Estate needs.
In Fritch - New wood
flooring, new AC and
furnace within the year.
New walls and ceilings.
Updated kitchen with
newer appliances.
Large backyard.
Storm windows,
security system.
Oversized 2 car garage.
Storage Building.
W/D Negotiable. All
appliances to convey.
$82,000
Call Bonnie Cowley
806-678-2047
Brierwood Apts.
For Rent
1, 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Castle Dr. Apts.
For Rent
3 bed / 1 bath
Fenced Yard
Call: 273-3982
New Year, New Career! Start off the
new year with a rewarding career in the
healthcare industry! Caprock Nursing
& Rehab is now hiring for CNAs! Don’t
have your cert|Ncat|on? we W|ll tra|n
youl we are accept|ng appl|cat|ons for
our Nurse A|de cert|Ncat|on program.
Classes are starting soon, don’t delay!
Call Penn| today at (8ê0j 2ï4-90êê or stop by
and see us at 9êê College Ave., 8orger, TX
ï9êêï. E0E.
COOK/DIETARY
Full Time; Monday
thru Friday. Meal
prep & other
kitchen duties.
Prefer experienced
individual, but
will train qualified
applicant to prepare
meals for special
diets. Must be reliable
and dependable, and
pass drug screen &
background check.
Apply in person,
CORONADO
HEALTHCARE
CENTER, 1504
W. Kentucky Ave,
Pampa.
Circulation Sales Rep Needed
The Borger News-Herald is looking for a Circula-
tion Sales Rep. Job entails taking care of a paid
subscriber base and newsstand distribution. The
circulation manager reports to the publisher. This
is a full time (40+ hours/week) position.
Responsibilities Include:
:lrcoesslng crders, payments, and renewals ln
circulation software.
:Flle malntenanoe/malllng llst management and
adjustments.
:Handllng subsorlber oustcmer servloe.
:^oqulrlng, renewlng, and brlnglng baok subsorlb-
ers.
:lreparlng mcnthly dlstrlbutlcn repcrts.
:Manage publlo plaoe ocples and ocntrclled
circulation.
:Managlng newsstand payments.
Qualifications:
:Ccmpetent ln Mlorcscft 0ffoe, espeolally Lxoel.
:Strcng typlng skllls.
:Lxoellent oustcmer servloe skllls.
:Demcnstrates rellablllty, crganlzatlcn, and dex-
lblllty.
:Lnthuslastlo, ocurtecus, empathetlo and hlghly
mctlvated.
Qualified applicants may apply in person at:
207 S. Main Street, Borger, Texas 79007
or by email to: publisher@borgernewsherald.com
LOOKING TO RENT OR BUY?
Find or place houses to rent in the
Borger News-Herald classifieds.
To place an ad call Jaime at (806) 273-5611
$27.
00
REGULAR LINE AD 10 WORDS PLUS ATTENTION GETTER
FOR
6 DAYS!
WEEKEND,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014
Borger News- Herald
8A
Community
Amarillo, Tx. – Hear ye,
hear ye, calling builders of
all ages! Join the Don Har-
rington Discovery Center
as they open LEGOâ Castle
Adventure and Little Builders
to visitors on January 25th.
In LEGO Castle Adventure,
children and families are
transported to the past to a
LEGO kingdom where they
too can become master castle
builders, using one of the
greatest building materials of
all time – LEGO bricks!
“LEGO Castle Adventure
gives visitors of the Discov-
ery Center the opportunity to
test their planning and con-
structing skills,” said Dr. Aar-
on Pan, Executive Director.
“This unique exhibit created
by The Children’s Museum
of Indianapolis and LEGO
Systems, Inc. is another great
opportunity for children and
families to learn through in-
ventive play with one of the
most-loved toys of all time.”
Visitors to LEGO Castle
Adventure will be immersed
in castle life through experi-
ences designed specifcally
for children and families. En-
ter the LEGO kingdom’s roy-
al castle to sit in the majesties’
thrones and view the royal
family’s portrait – made out
of LEGO bricks – and LEGO
suit of armor. View the king’s
secret treasure room flled
with LEGO jewels.
Even the youngest of
builders will enjoy putting to-
gether their own LEGO castle
creation. LEGO models of
real-world castles Blarney,
Arundel and Neuschwanstein
offer insights about how cas-
tles were planned and built.
Age-appropriate build areas
for Apprentice builders (tod-
dlers), Journeyman Builders
(ages 3-6) and Master Build-
ers (ages 7 and older) allow
children to use their new-
found knowledge to create
their own unique structures.
After visiting the throne
room, visitors can tour the
castle grounds and learn about
day-to-day castle life. Chil-
dren and families are able to
dress up as princes, princess-
es, knights or dragons; build a
LEGO brick topiary; or climb
a lookout tower. Children are
invited to don suspender-style
horses to play in a safe “joust-
ing feld” with foam-rubber
lances and soft targets set up
on the feld. And, of course,
no trip to the castle would be
complete without meeting the
resident LEGO dragon, but
don’t worry, she doesn’t bite!
Once visitors have learned
what it takes to plan and con-
struct a proper home for the
king and queen, they can test
out the castle’s defenses with
what else … a catapult. Using
a 3-D computer program and
real-world catapult, one can
virtually build and test the
castle walls and learn through
trial and error the most du-
rable way to build the castle’s
defenses.
Castles might belong more
to the Middle Ages, but the
skills of planning, imagina-
tion and fun learned in a trip
through LEGO Castle Ad-
venture are valuable to visi-
tors of all ages! LEGO Castle
Adventure will be showing at
the Discovery Center through
May 6th.
In addition to learning
about builders of the past, the
youngest visitors to the Dis-
covery Center will become
future builders in the new
Little Builders exhibit, which
will be on display through
September 19th. Donning lit-
tle hard hats and construction
vests, children ages 2-7 will
create, play and learn as they
explore the concepts of con-
struction, motion and simple
machines. This exhibit was
created and is toured by the
Oregon Museum of Science
and Industry, Portland, Or-
egon.
“Throughout Little Build-
ers, the open-ended nature of
the materials and activities
allows creativity to fourish,”
said Dr. Pan. “Children are
encouraged to use the exhibit
in their own ways, and thus,
learning becomes personal-
ized. Little Builders challeng-
es and entertains the mind of
a child helping to develop in-
tellectual, physical, emotional
and social skills”, he added.
“The exhibit uses scientifc
processes, mathematical con-
cepts, sensory development
and communication to pro-
mote self-confdence, coordi-
nation, control, strength and
self-expression.”
Visitors have the exciting
opportunity to:
· Hand-operate a pulley
and conveyer belt to explore
cause and effect
· Operate a child-size
crane to hook, lift and move
objects and materials
· Build structures with
blocks, pipes, Duplo® blocks
(toddlers’ large snap-on
blocks) and gears
· Insert balls into air
chutes and see them shoot
through clear pipes to experi-
ment with aerodynamics
The exhibit includes
fve themed areas to engage
young builders:
· Construction Site – Ex-
plore the physics of move-
ment by: climbing through
four levels of the Construc-
tion Site and transporting ob-
jects by turning the wheels of
a hand-operated pulley. Build
patterns in a brick wall and
“paint” with rollers.
· Structures – Discover
the concepts involved in
building: size, weight, shape,
balance, gravity and stability.
Create houses and more using
blocks, Duplo® blocks and
PVC pipes.
· Aerodynamics – Ex-
periment with the characteris-
tics of moving air by inserting
balls into vertical air chutes
and watch them whiz through
clear pipes and pop into a bas-
ket, demonstrating the path of
air.
· Cranes – Learn about
mechanical physics by mov-
ing block cargo to a waiting
fatbed car using a gantry
crane and rotating a miniature
crane to raise and lower its
hook to move blocks.
· Simple Machines – Ex-
plore and experiment with
simple machines using plastic
hammers, screwdrivers and
wrenches at the Tool Wall.
Work together at the con-
veyer belt moving materials
back and forth. Drop plastic
balls down a series of clear
pipes and watch as they travel
down a twisty path.
The LEGO Castle Adven-
ture traveling exhibition has
been funded by generous gifts
from The Josephine Anderson
Charitable Trust, Circle A Ti-
tle, Amarillo National Bank,
Deeds Construction, LLC,
Amarillo Pediatric Dentistry
& Orthodontics, The Kimble
Foundation Trust, Claudette
L. Landess, Amarillo Chil-
dren’s Clinic, PIA Insurance,
Prudential Ada, Realtors, TLC
Pediatrics of Amarillo, Wil-
liams-Boyce Agency, LLP,
and Wells Fargo Bank. Little
Builders is being sponsored
by The Panhandle of Texas
Chapter of The Associated
General Contractors of Amer-
ica, which includes Missouri
Valley, Inc., Southwest Gen-
eral Contractors, North Line
Construction, Inc., The Ritter
Company, Page & Associates
Contractors, Inc., West Texas
Contractors, Inc., and Wiley
Hicks Jr., Inc.
The LEGO Castle Ad-
venture traveling exhibition
and the Little Builders exhibit
will be open to the public on
Saturday January 25, 2014. A
members only preview will
be held on Friday January
24, 2014 at 7pm preceding a
private VIP Exhibit Preview
party recognizing the DHDC
Winter 2014 Exhibit Sponsors
taking place at 5pm. Media is
invited and encouraged to at-
tend either of these events.
Admission and Hours of
Operation
Admission is free for Dis-
covery Center members, $10
for adults, $7 for children and
students ages 3 to 22, $7 for
seniors ages 60+. Children 2
and under are admitted free.
All exhibits are included in
the admission price as well
as a variety of shows in our
unique Digistar 3 Space The-
ater.
The Discovery Center is
open to the public Tuesday
through Sunday during the
school year and seven days a
week from Memorial Day to
Labor Day. Hours of opera-
tion are 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon to 4:30 on Sunday.
LEGO Castle Adventure and Little
Builders Opening at Discovery Center
LEGO Inspired Multimedia Museum Exhibition
Opens to Public January 25
Austin, TX --- To-
day, Representative Four
Price was appointed as
the Vice Chair of the
Sunset Advisory Com-
mission by the Honorable
Joe Straus, Speaker of
the Texas House of Rep-
resentatives. Price, who
currently serves on the
Sunset Advisory Com-
mission, will, in his new
role as Vice Chair, help
lead the review of 21 state
government agencies, in-
cluding the state’s major
health and human service
agencies. Price will assist
Senator Jane Nelson, the
Chair of the Sunset Ad-
visory Commission, for
the Commission’s 2014-
2015 review cycle. The
chair and vice chair lead-
ership duties rotate each
cycle between the House
and the Senate.
“I am honored to be
selected as Vice Chair
of the Sunset Advisory
Commission and to work
again with this important
body,” Price said. “I look
forward to working with
Chair Nelson and all of
my colleagues on the
Commission. The Sunset
process is necessary for
ensuring our state agen-
cies are making the best
use of taxpayer dollars,
maintaining transpar-
ency and accountability
in their operations, and
ensuring that essential
services are being deliv-
ered as directed by the
legislature.”
“Sunset review and
accountability is a public
process with public in-
put for the public good. I
look forward to working
with the various agen-
cies, Sunset staff, my col-
leagues in the legislature,
and the public to review
and provide thoughtful
recommendations that
will further promote the
highest effectiveness of
our state government
agencies.”
The 12-member Sun-
set Advisory Commission
is responsible for review-
ing the policies and pro-
grams of state agencies,
identifying measures to
eliminate ineffciencies
and improve agency pro-
cesses. The 84th Texas
Legislature, when it con-
venes in January 2015,
will vote, based on Sun-
set recommendations,
whether to continue or
“sunset” (abolish) the
agencies under review, as
well as how to improve
the agencies being con-
tinued. The 2014-2015
review cycle includes
the Health and Human
Services Commission,
the Department of Aging
and Disability Services,
the Department of Assis-
tive and Rehabilitative
Services, the Department
of Family and Protective
Services, and the Depart-
ment of State Health Ser-
vices. At present, appro-
priations to these health
agencies comprise nearly
40 percent of the state’s
budget.
For more information
on the Sunset Advisory
Commission, please visit
www.sunset.state.tx.us.
Price Selected for Leadership Position
on Sunset Advisory Commission
Victory Baptist
Church
600 Morse
Stinnett, Tx
presents
Dr. Allen Hatch
Revival Starts
Sunday, January 19th, 2014 at 10 am, 11 am & 6 pm
Monday, January 20th at 6 pm
Tuesday, January 21st at 6 pm
Wednesday, January 22nd at 6 pm
If you are in need of a ride, please contact
Amanda @ 806-674-3563
$
75.
00
Carpet Cleaning
3 Room Special
25¢ per sq. foot
$
99.
00
Carpet
Installation
with Free Pad on
Installation
805 Weatherly • Borger
806.274.9271
New & Improved Location
Best Rates!
Best Results!!
Friendly Customer Service!!!
Satisfaction
Guaranteed!
EXPLORE A GIANT CASTLE
Sponsored by Josephine Anderson Charitable Trust
EXHIBIT AND SPONSORS
BUILD, BUILD, BUILD!— MASTER BUILDERS AREA
Sponsored by Circle A Title and Amarillo National Bank
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Weekend January 18-19, 2014
1B
Weekend Sports Highlights
Frank Phillips College
defeats
Clarendon
Frank Phillips Col-
lege (12-6) traveled to
Clarendon,Tx thursday night
to go up against Clarendon
College. It had to be a fast
moving tough game with a
fnal score of FPC 78 and
Clarendon 75.
The nights top perform-
ers for this game were:
Rasheed Swanston 22
point and 7 rebounds.
Darrell Robinson 17
points, 10 rebounds, 3 as-
sists, and 1 steal.
Chris Hall 10 points, 2
assists, and 3 steals.
Head Coach Chris Hack-
ett and his assistant coaches
have really done a great job
with the team this year.
Make sure you goo over
to the BCAC at Frank Phil-
lips College and catch all the
games. There is no charge to
watch and the gym is beauti-
ful.
The next home game
will be Monday when they
play South Plains College
at 7:45. Shoot, you may as
well go early and catch the
girls game frst. Their game
starts at 5:45.
Let’s support our local
College!
Let’s play some
baseball people!
We just received a bit
of information that I know
so many of you have been
anticipating! Here it is, it’s
time to head on down to The
Agnes House and get signed
up for TPBA Baseball. You
can sign up on Saturday
January 18th from 9-3; Sat-
urday January 25th from 9-3
; and Saturday February 1st
also from 9-3. See you at
the ball feld.
Freestyle School of Ka-
rate & MMA in the Megert
shopping center is now of-
fering JR. MMA classes.
The two boy’s in the pho-
to to the right are training in
JR. MMA. Training togeth-
er is one thing, but let’s hope
these two never end up in a
match together.
I personally don’t think
it would be a good thing to
fght a family member. Then
again, there are some folks
out there that would love to
get a certain family member
in the ring or cage.
If you get a chance go by
the school and watch some
of the training. Who know’s,
you may just leave their
signed up for classes your-
self!
Isiah Aguilera and Marcus Aguilera
Cousins learning and
training MMA
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Ok Borger folks, I know
our Bulldogs and Lady
Bulldogs had a rough night
in Perryton on Tuesday,
but tonight they were all on
fre! Just the way we like to
see them play.
Tonight River Road
came to town with the
intentions of leaving as
winners. Not tonight!
Our Bulldogs and Lady
Bulldogs gave them a run
for the money, or hoop I
should say.
Lady Bulldogs started
it off by defeating River
Road with a fnal score of
57-34!
Shortly afterwards the
Bulldogs came out growl-
ing. They followed the girls
example and gave River
Road a workout. Bulldogs
win with the fnal score of
62-42! Way to go Borger!
Be sure to tell everyone
you know to come on out
to the doghouse next Fri-
day night and watch these
fne young athletes send
Dalhart back home crying.
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Aden Englund and JJ Smith
And just look at these
two little ones! In the pic-
ture on the right, we have
Aden Englund and JJ Smith.
They are just so proud of
themselves and I can just
imagine how proud their
parents are.
These two boys are in
the Kids Jiu-Jitsu class and
apparently doing very well.
They just competed in the
World Championship in
Dallas on December 15th.
And get this, they have
only been training for two
months!
They both did such a
fantastic job that they each
won SILVER medals!
Sending out a big con-
gratulations the these two
little ones!
You can sign your kid-
dos up, boys and girls, at
the school. Classes are on
Tuesday and Thursday at
6:30 -7:00 pm.
Bulldogs and Lady
Bulldogs
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
WENGEN, Switzerland
(AP) — Ted Ligety was al-
ready the favorite for Olym-
pic gold in giant slalom. He
may have just made himself
the frontrunner in another
discipline as well.
The American giant sla-
lom specialist earned his
frst super-combined victory
on the World Cup on Friday
— a discipline he already
owns an Olympic and world
championship title in but
had curiously never won on
the season-long circuit.
The American trailed
Alexis Pinturault of France
after the morning slalom
leg but surpassed last year’s
Wengen super-combined
winner in the decisive
downhill run on the classic
Lauberhorn slope.
“This is defnitely a big
victory for me,” said Ligety,
whose previous 19 career
World Cup wins all came
in giant slalom. “It’s a nice
little confdence boost and
step in the right direction for
getting ready for Sochi.”
Ligety won three gold
medals at the 2013 world
championships at Schald-
ming, Austria, but has strug-
gled to establish himself as
an all-around skier on the
grueling World Cup tour.
“It is going to be dif-
fcult to repeat what I did
in Schaldming — that was
kind of a dream two weeks,”
Ligety acknowledged. “I
know I have the ability to be
on the podium in combined
and super-G if things stack
up for me.”
They did Friday on what
United States head coach
Sasha Rearick called a
“great day” for the team, cit-
ing a key assist from team-
mate Bode Miller.
Ligety overturned a
1.22-second defcit from
the slalom to beat Pinturault
by 0.22. Natko Zrncic-Dim
of Croatia was third, trail-
ing 1.08 behind Ligety’s
combined two-run time of 2
minutes, 44.74 seconds.
Pinturault suggested he
and Ligety are the main med-
al contenders in the Sochi
super-combined scheduled
for Feb. 14.
“Yes, of course. The big
challengers for me is going
to be Ted Ligety and Ivica
Kostelic, for sure,” said the
22-year-old Frenchman.
Ligety, Pinturault and
Marcel Hirscher are the es-
tablished big three in a high-
class giant slalom line-up,
and the American’s latest
downhill display suggested
his world title in super-com-
bined was no fuke.
“I had a way of fgur-
ing out how to win the big
events, like Olympics and
world championships, in
combined but never put to-
gether the runs I needed
to win a World Cup,” said
Ligety, who won at the 2006
Turin Winter Game when
the combined included two
slalom legs.
On Friday, the coaches’
strategy for Ligety’s down-
hill was fne-tuned by Mill-
er’s radio briefng, minutes
after he skied down to an
eventual ninth-place fnish
on a soft course worsening
fast in mid-afternoon sun-
shine.
“Bode confrmed a couple
of things where you could
trim the race line and avoid
a couple of holes,” Rearick
said. “We changed the re-
port a few times on many
sections and Ted executed
every one of them beauti-
fully and aggressively.”
“That was impressive,”
the U.S. head coach said.
Miller, the reigning
super-combined Olympic
champion, fnished 2.15
seconds behind Ligety af-
ter being seventh fastest in
tricky slalom conditions in
the morning.
Aksel Lund Svindal of
Norway fnished ffth and
took the overall World Cup
lead from Austrian rival
Hirscher, who skips speed
events. Svindal earned 45
World Cup points to lead
Hirscher by 22
Svindal posted the fastest
downhill time Friday, sug-
gesting he could challenge
for victory in Saturday’s
classic downhill for the frst
time in his storied career.
Ligety also extended his
advantage over Pinturault in
the race for third place over-
all. Ligety trails Svindal by
264 points.
The expected challenge
by Kostelic, the Olym-
pic silver medalist in both
2006 and 2010, ended early
when he straddled a slalom
gate. The veteran Croatian
is a six-time winner in sla-
lom and super-combined in
Wengen.
Organizers ran the slalom
frst on Friday to give time
for cloud cover to clear and
also to prepare the short-
ened, 3.1-kilometer (1.9-
mile) downhill course after
heavy overnight snowfall.
On Saturday, the 84th
Lauberhorn race will fol-
low the full 4.42 kilometers
(2.75 miles) course, twisting
beneath the Eiger mountain.
Miller will seek his third
victory, after wins in 2007
and ‘08. He was also runner-
up the following year.
Ligety will take a day off
to rest before Sunday duty
in the slalom.
Ted Ligety wins 1st
World Cup
super-combined
Borger News- Herald
Sports
2B
WEEKEND,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014
Phillips Golf Course
1609 Sterling • Borger • 806-274-6812
10
%
Discount On
Memberships
DAILY
Specials
$
25.
00
Cart & Green Fees
Daily Express, a leader in Heavy Haul and Specialized Transportation, is in need of
experienced Contractors to pull our step-deck and lowboy trailers hauling Machinery,
Construction, fabricated and Agricultural loads to multiple destinations. We can also
lease on Contractors with their own Step-deck or RGN’s.
Get on board with a proven leader today! Call Erik or Nicole at
1-800-669-6414 or apply at www.dailyrecruiting.com
CONTRACTORS NEEDED!
Express Inc.
**Best FSC in the Industry**No Trailer Rent, No Agents
or Brokers, Free Base Plate, Paid Permits/Escorts and
Advancement Opportunities!**
NEW YORK (AP) —
New Orleans safety Rafael
Bush was fned $21,000 by
the NFL on Friday for his
hit on Seattle’s Percy Harvin
during an NFC divisional-
round game.
Harvin has a concussion
and has been ruled out of
Sunday’s NFC champion-
ship game. The wide receiv-
er did not practice all week
and was not cleared through
the league’s concussion pro-
tocol.
Harvin was belted by
Bush on Seattle’s opening
possession last Saturday, a
hit that drew a 15-yard pen-
alty. He left the game later in
the frst half after a second
hit in which he was jumping
for a pass in the end zone.
He banged his head on the
turf when he came down as
he was being hit by safety
Malcolm Jenkins.
Three players were
fned $7,875 each from the
49ers’ victory over Caro-
lina last weekend: San
Francisco running back
Frank Gore and wide re-
ceiver Anquan Boldin and
Carolina cornerback Josh
Thomas.
Gore grabbed the face-
mask of Panthers lineback-
er Thomas Davis. Boldin
was fned for a head butt.
Thomas threw a punch to-
ward 49ers receiver Quin-
ton Patton but was not
ejected.
New England running
back Stevan Ridley was
fned $5,250 for a uniform
violation for wearing red
shoes in a win over India-
napolis.
Saints safety
Rafael Bush fned
for Harvin hit
Sunday, Jan. 26 At Alo-
ha Stadium Honolulu Pro
Bowl draft will take place
Wednesday, Jan. 22
x-will not play; r-replace-
ment
OFFENSE
Quarterbacks — Tom Bra-
dy, Patriots; Drew Brees,
Saints; Peyton Manning,
Broncos; Cam Newton,
Panthers; Philip Rivers,
Chargers; Russell Wilson,
Seahawks.
Wide Receivers — Antonio
Brown, Steelers; Dez Bry-
ant, Cowboys; Josh Gor-
don, Browns; A.J. Green,
Bengals; Andre Johnson,
Texans; Calvin Johnson,
Lions; Brandon Marshall,
Bears; Demaryius Thomas
(Broncos).
Tackles — Branden Albert,
Chiefs; r-Duane Brown,
Texans; x-Jason Peters,
Eagles; Tyron Smith, Cow-
boys; Joe Staley, 49ers; Joe
Thomas, Browns; Trent Wil-
liams, Redskins.
Guards — Jahri Evans,
Saints; Ben Grubbs, Saints;
Mike Iupati, 49ers; Logan
Mankins, Patriots; Louis
Vasquez, Broncos; Marshal
Yanda, Ravens.
Centers — Ryan Kalil, Pan-
thers; Alex Mack, Browns;
Mike Pouncey, Dolphins;
Max Unger, Seahawks.
Tight Ends — Jordan Cam-
eron, Browns; Vernon Da-
vis, 49ers; Jimmy Graham,
Saints; Julius Thomas,
Broncos.
Running Backs — Ja-
maal Charles, Chiefs; Matt
Forte, Bears; Frank Gore,
49ers; Marshawn Lynch,
Seahawks; LeSean McCoy,
Eagles; Adrian Peterson, Vi-
kings.
Fullbacks — Marcel Reece,
Raiders; Mike Tolbert, Pan-
thers.
DEFENSE
Defensive Ends — Greg
Hardy, Panthers; Cam-
eron Jordan, Saints; Rob-
ert Quinn, Rams; Cameron
Wake, Dolphins; J.J. Watt,
Texans; Mario Williams,
Bills.
Interior Linemen — r-Jason
Hatcher, Dallas; Gerald Mc-
Coy, Bucs; x-Haloti Ngata,
Ravens; Dontari Poe, Chiefs;
Justin Smith, 49ers; Ndamu-
kong Suh, Lions; Kyle Wil-
liams, Bills.
Outside Linebackers — John
Abraham, Cardinals; Ah-
mad Brooks, 49ers; Tamba
Hali, Chiefs; Justin Hous-
ton, Chiefs; Robert Mathis,
Colts; Terrell Suggs, Ra-
vens.
Inside/Middle Linebackers
— NaVorro Bowman, 49ers;
Vontaze Burfct, Bengals;
Luke Kuechly, Panthers;
Patrick Willis, 49ers.
Cornerbacks — Brandon
Flowers, Chiefs; Brent
Grimes, Dolphins; Joe Ha-
den, Browns; Patrick Pe-
terson, Cardinals; Darrelle
Revis, Bucs; Richard Sher-
man, Seahawks; Aqib Talib,
Patriots; Alterraun Verner,
Titans.
Free Safeties — Jairus Byrd,
Bills; Earl Thomas, Sea-
hawks; Eric Weddle, Char-
gers.
Strong Safeties — Eric Ber-
ry, Chiefs; Kam Chancellor,
Seahawks; Troy Polamalu,
Steelers.
SPECIAL TEAMS
Punters — Brandon Fields,
Dolphins; Johnny Hekker,
Rams.
Placekickers — Matt Prater,
Broncos; Justin Tucker, Ra-
vens.
Punt Returners — Antonio
Brown, Steelers; Dexter
McCluster, Chiefs.
Special Teamers — Justin
Bethel, Cardinals; Matthew
Slater, Patriots.
Long Snapper — Matt Over-
ton, Colts.
2014 Pro Bowl Picks
At the University of
Texas, football is religion. At
Penn State University, they
need football for redemp-
tion. So when these storied
programs hired black head
coaches within days of each
other to return them to past
glory, it was a major mo-
ment for a sport that has
been among the slowest to
promote African-American
leaders at the highest level.
There have been other
black head coaches at top
football schools — Notre
Dame, Stanford, Miami,
UCLA. But the recent hiring
of Charlie Strong at Texas
and James Franklin at Penn
State sent a powerful mes-
sage, because of the com-
bined prestige, mystique and
infuence of those teams.
“It’s a historical mo-
ment,” said Doug Williams,
the frst black quarterback
to win a Super Bowl and a
former head coach at Gram-
bling.
“We’ve come a long way
in a couple weeks,” Williams
said. “Even though we don’t
have as many as you would
like, but when you get a
Penn State and a Texas, them
schools together almost make
up for about 10 schools.”
There are 125 colleges
playing in the top-level Foot-
ball Bowl Subdivision. In
2013, 13 of them had black
coaches. That was down
from 15 in 2012 and an all-
time high of 17 in 2011.
Franklin was replaced by an
African-American on Friday
when Vanderbilt announced
it hired Stanford defensive co-
ordinator Derek Mason to fll
the Commodores’ vacancy.
But for Franklin, the num-
bers are less important than
the opportunities.
“I don’t underestimate the
signifcance of this moment.
I take a lot of pride in that,”
he said in an interview. “But
the most important thing is
we’re getting to a point where
universities and organizations
and corporations are hiring
people based on merit and the
most qualifed guy.
“We’re making tremen-
dous strides,” Franklin said.
“The more opportunities that
coaches get and go out and
do well and succeed, it helps.
It helps change perceptions,
and perceptions are a power-
ful thing.”
Black coaches have won
championships in college
basketball and pro football,
baseball and basketball. But
no black coach has won the
college football national title.
For Ty Willingham, who
in 2001 became the frst black
head football coach at Notre
Dame, the recent events pro-
duced a mixture of emotions.
“You are extremely proud
that it is an African-Ameri-
can,” Willingham said. “At
the same time, it represents
that an outstanding coach has
proved his abilities. That’s
what the whole struggle is
about, is the opportunity for a
man to prove his abilities.
“I don’t think it’s a novelty
now,” said Willingham, who
also led teams at Stanford and
the University of Washing-
ton. “In a sense, we’re past
it. I still don’t think we’re at
that place where it is a com-
monplace thought. But we
are getting closer, and that is
a wonderful day.”
That may be one reason
why race was not a domi-
nant theme when Strong and
Franklin were named last
week. Some noted that Texas,
which felded college foot-
ball’s last all-white champion-
ship team in 1969, had never
had a black coach before. And
the success of the black coach
Kevin Sumlin at archrival
Texas A&M made race less
of an issue with Strong.
But the issue was still
there — when T-shirts went
on sale with Strong’s face and
the words “Black is the new
Brown” (a reference to out-
going coach Mack Brown),
or when people questioned
whether race was the reason
billionaire Texas booster Red
McCombs criticized Strong’s
hire and said he would make
a good position coach or co-
ordinator.
John Thompson, the pio-
neering black college basket-
ball coach with Georgetown,
said it doesn’t make sense
when so many players but so
few coaches are black.
“If you love something
well enough to perform at it,
you got to perform at it intel-
lectually as well as physically.
You can’t be a good football
or basketball player consis-
tently and be stupid,” Thomp-
son said. “So (when) you are
not in management, you’re
still perceived as the one who
picks the cotton rather than
owns the plantation.”
Football coaches usually
get their frst top jobs after
success as offensive or defen-
sive coordinator. Strong was
stuck for a decade as defensive
coordinator for championship
Florida teams, getting passed
over for numerous head coach
positions. In 2009, just before
Louisville made him its head
coach, Strong said he was
told that one Southeastern
Conference doormat did not
hire him in part because his
wife is white.
Franklin, 41, is a dozen
years younger that Strong.
In some ways, his rapid rise
illuminates the greater op-
portunities available to a new
generation of black coaches.
Franklin hopped back and
forth from college to NFL jobs
before spending 2008-2010
as Maryland’s offensive co-
ordinator and head-coach-in-
waiting. Vanderbilt hired him
for the 2011 season. Three
winning campaigns later, he
landed one of the most presti-
gious jobs in college sports.
Since his arrival at Penn
State, Franklin’s narrative has
not been about race — Mike
Tomlin has won a Super
Bowl down the road in Pitts-
burgh — but about restor-
ing Penn State’s reputation,
which crumbled beneath the
horrifc child rape scandal
that ended Joe Paterno’s reign
of 45 years as head coach.
“There’s no question that
the so-called prime jobs, pro-
grams with great traditions,
have been less available to
African-Americans,” said
Richard Lapchick, who has
spent decades advocating for
more diversity in sports.
He said it has been tough-
er for black coaches to build
winning traditions because
they usually get opportuni-
ties with losing teams, and
it’s tough to turn that around
before the ax falls in two or
three years.
‘Historic’
black coach hires at Texas
and Penn State
SAN ANTONIO (AP) —
With Tim Duncan and Manu
Ginobili sitting late, the San
Antonio Spurs needed Tony
Parker to come through again.
Parker had 25 points and
nine assists and San Antonio
escaped a late rally to beat the
Utah Jazz 109-105 on Wednes-
day night, extending their win-
ning streak to six games.
The Spurs appeared destined
for a relatively easy night after
Parker, Duncan and Ginobili
led them to an 18-point lead
midway through the third
quarter. Everything came un-
raveled as the Jazz closed the
game on a 21-9 run to pull
within a basket in the fnal
minute.
With Parker guiding a hybrid
lineup, San Antonio held on
to hand Utah its sixth straight
loss at the AT&T Center.
“(Parker) pulled us through
it again,” San Antonio coach
Gregg Popovich said. “They
did a good job coming back
and always been a gritty,
physical group. They never
give in. They did a good job
coming back and then they
were fortunate enough to
make some shots, some tough
shots that got them back in the
game. All three (Parker, Dun-
can and Ginobili) of those
guys did a great job, but then
in the fourth Tony saved it for
us, really.”
Duncan, Marco Belinelli
and Kawhi Leonard scored
15 points each, and Ginobili
had 13 in his frst home start
of the season for San Antonio
(31-8).
Utah was without Gor-
don Hayward for the third
straight game with a strained
hip fexor. Even without their
leading scorer, the Jazz didn’t
have any problems putting up
points and placing a scare in
the West-leading Spurs.
Enes Kanter had 25 points
off the bench for Utah (13-
27). Burks scored 20 points,
Derrick Favors had 19
points and 12 rebounds,
Trey Burke added 17 points
and former Spurs forward
Richard Jefferson had 15
points.
Duncan and Ginobili both
re-entered the game for the
fnal 4.3 seconds, but they
were essentially bystanders
as San Antonio collapsed
down the stretch. Duncan
exited with 2:40 left in the
third quarter and the Spurs
leading 74-60 and led 86-
73 when Ginobili left with
10:02 remaining.
Parker’s 16-foot jumper
put San Antonio ahead 102-
88 with 3 minutes left when
things started to fall apart.
“(Pop) thought it was prob-
ably over,” Ginobili said.
“Tim was already stiff, so
he probably thought it was
over and then it got com-
plicated. Once you sit for
so long, especially at 37 (as
Duncan is), it’s harder to get
back in.”
Burke hit a jumper and a
3-pointer to cut the Spurs’
lead to 105-102 with 17.7
seconds left. Following
a pair of free throws by
Belinelli, the rookie from
Michigan hit another 3 to
pull the Jazz within 107-
105 with 4.3 seconds re-
maining.
“It just shows who (Burke)
is,” Utah coach Tyrone
Corbin said. “There is not
a moment that is too big for
him. He relishes in those
moments. We are going
to need him to continue to
grow in those moments.”
The Jazz were forced to foul
with time running out and Be-
linelli closed the scoring with
a pair of free throws.
Parker scored seven points
in the fnal quarter, including
four in the fnal 3 minutes.
“It’s just Pops calling my
number lately,” Parker said.
“Since the beginning of the
season, he’s playing every-
body, and lately he’s been
calling my number.”
Parker only had six points
at the half, matching his new
starting partner in the back-
court, Ginobili.
Ginobili did not start the
second half, but that mattered
little as the other two members
of the team’s Big 3 stepped
up. Duncan and Parker com-
bined to score the team’s frst
12 points of the quarter for
the Spurs’ frst double-digit
lead at 64-52.
“The Spurs will make you
pay for the mistakes you
make,” Favors said. “We did
not play basic defense and
got beat backdoor a lot in the
third quarter.”
Spurs’ win streak to 6 with
109-105 win over Jazz
Town & Country, REALTORS
®
www.tcr-borger.com • 1000 S. Cedar • (806)274-7253
REALTORS:
JOYRUSH, ABR - (806) 341-4663
JUNE VOIGT - (806) 886-7758
CONNIE HARRIS • JANE HERNDON
LORI MAY, BROKER/ASSOCIATE
JANABROWN, BROKER/OWNER
135 Clubhouse - Possible Owner Finance
3/1 3/4/Carport & Shop - $125,00
1102 Cooley - New paint int. & ext.
3/1/1 det - $34,000
1401 Lancelot
3/2/2 - $99,900
402 N. Cornell
2/2/2 - $35,000
303 Folsom
3/2.5/2 Det. - $145,000
1038 Plains - Fritch
3/2/2 - $120 ,000
208 Pinehurst
4/2/2 - $209,900
915 Roosevelt - $89,900
3/2/Basement/Detached Garage/Shop
810 Bagwell
3/1/1 Att - $72,500
917 Roosevelt
3/1/2 Det - $30,000
130 Apache Trail - Fritch
2/1/2 Det - $60,000
502 S. Vaughn
31/1 Carport - $45,000
900 Robey
3/2/2 - $76,000
224 Calle Questa
3/2/2 Att - $119,900
104 Salina
4/2.5/2 - $238,000
Commercial 8240 HWY 136
$25,000
403 Broadmoor
3/2.5/2 Att - $185,000
115 Teague
2/1.5/1 Carport - $25,000
1017 Harrison -
$99,900 - 3/2/2
1310 Evergreen
4/2.5/2 - $169,900
213 Loma Linda
4/3 1/2/3 - $314,000
217 Teague
5/3/2 Carport - $159,900
400 Dogwood
4/3/2 Att. - $159,900
1016 Plains
3/2.5/2 - $119,900
111 Wilshire
2/2/2 - $109,900
244 Alibates - Beautiful
Mobile on 1.25 acre
3/2/det. shop - $85,900
902 Harrington
3/2 - $45,000
1004 Dillard
3/2/2 Det. - $124,000
130 Broadmoor
3/2/2 - $105,000
204 Stewart - Brick
2/1/2 - $49,900
2003 Bayview
3/2/1 - $77,000
REDUCED
UNDER
CONTRACT
HOUSE FOR RENT:
0 Clubhouse
Fritch, Tx
$375/Month
LOTS FOR SALE:
Lot 16, Blk M:
23-29 Acres
Stinnett - $400,000
LOT STINNETT HGW:
20 Acres
$210,000
2 Story Duplex -
$15,000
Call Us at
(806)274-7253
We will be
happy to help
you fnd your
new home!
500 N. Main
Ralph White - Broker/Owner
Amy Jackson, Jodina Plumley,
Jean Chisum, Gayle White, Miclyn Reece
& Allen Jenkins/Sales Associates
Each Independently Owned & Operated
BEAUTIFUL 4 BRM HOME with 2.5 baths, newer tile,
custom ceilings, freplace, unfnished basement, sun room,
offce, updated kitchen with large island, marble counter
tops, newer appliances, and two sinks. Great fagstone out-
door patio with freplace, hot tub, grilll, side burner, fridge
and cable. Huge yard with fre pit, playground, sprinkler
system and landscaping. All located on corner with 2 lots.
$264,900
REDUCED! GREAT 3 YR OLD HOME with 3 brms, 2
baths, large open living, dining, and kitchen area, isolated
master with large bath, jetted tub, separate shower, cov-
ered patio, 2 car attached garage, 1 car detached shop,
and located on approx. 3.9 acres. Nice country home for
$215,000
THIS AWESOME CUSTOMBUILT home features 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths, great kitchen with built ins, living room
with wood burning stove, newer sunroom to die for, central
heat and air, large covered deck, 2 car attached garage,
14x48 pole bar, 10x20 hay barn, dog run, garden, water
well. All located on approx. 10 acres, 7 of the acres fenced
for animals. This home is updated and ready to move in.
Basement with approx. 375 sq. ft. $209,900
THIS BEAUTIFUL HOME features 4 brms, 3 baths, mul-
tiple living areas, freplace, super kitchen with granite and
built-ins, dining area, multiple garages, fenced back yard,
sprinkler system, circle drive and backs up to the Borger
Country Club golf course. Great view for $199,900
THIS AWESOME custom built large family home in a
historic area features 4 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 2 large
living areas, freplace, super kitchen with built ins, dining
area, large laundry room, large 2 car detached garage with
att. shop, central heat and air, nice fenced back yard, sprin-
kler system, many updates throughout, beautiful hard wood
foors. This is a must see in a great location. $184,900
GREAT HOME on a large lot. Features 4 brms, 2.5 baths,
3 living areas, nice kitchen with built-ins, dining room, fre-
place, nice fenced yard, and a 2 car att garage. $175,900
THIS IS THE CIRCLE ROLLER RINK that has been in
Borger for many years! The current owner totally remodeled
it, plus the owner purchased new skates, new equipment,
new fooring, new bathrooms, newer wiring and plumbing.
Current owners will train new owners. Great family busi-
ness. Regular skating on Fridays and Saturdays and spe-
cial parties throughout the year. $169,900
GREAT 5 BRM HOME with 3 baths, updated kitchen
that is open to a spacious living area, separate dining area,
basement with wet bar, game area, 2 freplaces, updated
bathrooms, great covered patio/deck. Home has so much
to offer. $167,500
AWESOME SPACIOUS 4 BRM home with 2 baths and
located on a great street! Custom ceilings throughout, sky-
lights, wood fooring, library paneling, freplace, breakfast
bar, double oven, isolated master with separate dressing
areas and walk in closets, covered patio with view of coun-
try side and a 2 car attached garage. $159,900.
GREAT HOME IN PANHANDLE features 3 brms, 2
baths, large kitchen with eating area, large family room with
freplace, central heat and air, covered patio, large yard with
tons of trees, newer carpet, newer carpet, newer roof, and a
2 car oversized garage. Ready to move in to at $139,900.
AWESOME 3 BRMHOME 2 baths, on a large corner lot,
beautiful landscaped yard, pond in the back with covered
patio, newer fxtures, recessed lighting, kitchen/dining room
with breakfast bar, living area with freplace, custom ceil-
ings, and a 2 car attached garage. $139,900
NICE 5 BRM HOME with 3 baths, split level with two liv-
ing areas, kitchen with built-ins, beautifully updated deck/
covered patio with fagstone, newer storage shed/work-
shop, nice size backyard. Great curb appeal for $138,000
LARGE 4 BRM HOME with 1 full bath and 1 1/2 bath.
Fourth bedroom could be an offce, kitchen has all new
custom cabinets and counter tops, breakfast nook, built-in
hutch, formal living room, den, 2 car attached garage and a
1 car carport. $135,900
VERY NICE WELL maintained home located in a quiet
area. Features 3 brms, 2 baths, 2 living areas, new paint,
texture, light fxtures, ceiling fans, fooring and front door.
Newer garage door on the 2 car attached garage, newer
water heater and additional insulation blow into attic. Great
home for $130,000.
NICE UPDATED HOME with 4 brms, 2 baths, recently
updated kitchen, basement has new tile and paint, base-
ment could be 5th brm, large utility room, new siding and
eves, newer roof, too much to list. Also features a 2 car att
garage, fenced yard and located on a corner. $124,500
SUPER NEAT HOME with 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2 baths,
large living room, great kitchen with built-ins, large eating
area, central heat and air, and a 1 car attached garage.
$109,900
HOME LOCATED on a corner lot with 3 brms, 2 baths,
open living and dining area with freplace, large utility room,
large master, large patio and storage bld in back, and a 2
car attached garage. Great family home. $104,500
NICE HOME in a great location and is move in ready con-
dition. Features 3 brms, 2 baths, kitchen with built-ins and
breakfast bar, utility room, fenced backyard with a covered
patio, 2 car attached garage and a large storage building/
shop in the back yard. Great home for $95,900
GREAT COUNTRY HOME with 2 brms, 1 bath, large
kitchen with breakfast bar and newer cabinets, addition
that could be a 3rd bedroom or den/sunroom, nice covered
patio, cellar. Has a detached building that has a room and
bathroom, 2 car shop, 1 car garage, RV port, storage build-
ings and all located on 2.5 acres. Perfect for country living
and ready to move in to!! $94,900
AWESOME LARGE BRICK HOME with 4 bedrooms, 3
bathrooms, 3 living areas, nice kitchen, freplace, central
heat and air, oversized 2 car garage, fenced backyard, nice
wooden deck. This is a one of a kind home that would make
some family a great home. $89,900
NICE HOME located in a quiet area, features 3 brms, 2
baths, cute kitchen with island bar, dining room, nice liv-
ing with freplace, master with large closet, 2 car attached
garage and a large fenced yard that would be great for kids
or pets. $89,500
THIS GREAT FAMILY HOME features 3 brms, 2 baths,
living room, family roomwith freplace, nice kitchen with built
ins, 1 car att. garage, central heat and air, fenced back yard,
and a nice covered front porch. Great location. $84,900
GREAT COUNTRY LIVING IN FRITCH! Large home
with 3 brms, 2 baths, 2 living areas, nice kitchen, central
heat & air, and attached garage. Owner will consider owner
fnance with 10% down. $79,500
NICE HOME WITH 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, family room
with freplace, nice kitchen, central heat and air. One car
detached garage with attached room with a bath. Located
across street from a park. $67,900
NICE ROOMY HOME on a corner lot. Features 3 brms, 2
baths, large living room, great kitchen, central heat and air,
fenced backyard, lot of home for the money. Family room
has new paint and nice hardwood fooring. $65,900
VERY NICE HOME that has been remodeled inside.
Features 3 brms, 1 bath, all new foorings, cabinet tops, ap-
pliances, paint, texture and light fxtures. New paint outside
and a 1 car attached garage. Home is truly move in ready!
$64,900
GREAT 3 BRM HOME with 1 bath, granite kitchen coun-
ters and breakfast bar, covered patio, storage shed, newer
fence and a 1 car attached garage. $63,000
THIS IS AGREAT MANUFACTURED home with 4 brms,
2 baths, 3 living areas, freplace, large living area, nice
kitchen with built-ins, central heat and air, and a attached 2
car garage. $59,900
THIS COULD BE a great investment property located
on a large corner lot in a quiet area. Features 3 brms, 2
baths, nice kitchen, lots of room, just needs some fnishing
up. $52,900
GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY or frst home, needs
a little work but would be a great home. Features 3 brms,
2 baths, nice all electric kitchen, laundry room, central heat
and air, and a 2 car detached garage. $49,900
NICE BRICK HOME WITH 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, large
kitchen, large living room, newer heat and air, one car att.
garage, nice fenced back yard, corner lot. $49,900
THIS GREAT HOME is in good condition with 3 brms, 1
bath, oversized 1 car garage, nice kitchen with stove and
fridge, cell, great wood deck and a fenced yard with storage
bld. $44,900
VERY NICE WELL KEPT 3 brms, 1 bath home. Features
nice kitchen with appliances, eating area, washer and dryer,
newer roof and a oversized attached carport. Priced to sell
at $34,900
PLEASE COME BYOUR OFFICE OR CALLFOR ALIST
OF ALL THE PROPERTIES THAT ARE CURRENTLY ON
THE MARKET, OR CALL TODAY FOR A FREE MARKET
ANALYSIS ON YOUR HOME.
UNDER
CONTRACT
UNDER
CONTRACT
UNDER
CONTRACT
Borger News-Herald January 18-19, 2014
HUTCHINSON COUNTYrealty guides
Many memories to be made here on Brookshire.....
Real Estate Concepts
Joyce Trigg - Broker/Owner
Charles Trigg - Property Manager
(806) 273-5535
VISIT RECBORGER.COM OR REALTOR.COM
Your Real Estate Home!
Beautiful foor plan, plenty
of square feet, multiple
bedrooms & baths. Covered
patio, stg. blg., small shop.
Many amenities. Call for more
details on this beautiful 1990’s
Country Club Estate home. No
City taxes, school bus service
available, close to Country Club,
swimming pool , tennis & golf.
618 Brookshire
Real Estate Concepts
Joyce Trigg - Broker/Owner
Charles Trigg - Property Manager
806-273-5557
We Do Property Management Also!
100 CLARK ST.
STINNETT
215 ABILENE
$79,900
235 GOLDEN - OWNER FINANCE
$49,900
PRICE
REDUCED!
618 BROOKSHIRE
PRICE
REDUCED!
928 NELSON
$29,900
VISIT RECBORGER.COM OR REALTOR.COM
Central Station & Wilson Apartments For Rent!
409 UNION
$42,900
RESTAURANT
& LOTS
DAKE’S
809 N. MAIN ST.
WWW.FRENCHANDCO.COM
630 N. Main
The Team of Distinction
Rhonda
Sudbrink
(806)
570-0383
Rossetta
Hanna
(806)
382-3762
Konni
Meyer
(806)
336-2131
Beth Ann
French-
Campbell
(806)
679-5647
Pablo
Sintas
(806)
674-7234
Paul D.
French
(806)
274-7355
MLK NEWLISTING Fritch, 3
Living areas, 3 bdrms, 3 baths, 2
FP, 2 car garage w/opener, wet bar,
patio, landscaped $244,900
FREE AT LAST NEWLISTING
Fritch, Adorable 2 bdrm, 1 bath,
detached garage, huge front porch,
great curb appeal $40,000
ACTIVIST Open foor plan, 2
living areas, FP, 3 bdrms, 2 baths,
2 car garage, new granite kitchen
counter-tops, landscaped $166,000
EQUALITY Fritch, 3 bdrms, 2
updated baths, 2 large living areas, 2
car detached garage with foored attic
and heated rm $124,800
DEDICATION 3 bdrms, 1.5 baths,
bonus room, central heat/ air, utility
room, carport, 2 driveways
$60,000
HUMANITARIAN Reduced
Open foor plan, 2 living areas,
separate master & dining, 4 bdrms,
2 baths, attached garage $62,500
REMEMBRANCE 1.98 acres, 5
bdrms, 3.5 baths, bonus room, great
view, 2 living areas, granite island,
all appliances stay $279,900
SHARE THE DREAM 2 living areas,
3 bdrms, 2 baths, updated master bath
and kitchen, some hardwood foors, 2
car garage $98,200
PHILOSOPHY Perfect location!
Your business will boom, Main
Street, super building.
$61,000
HONORED Fritch, 3 bdrms, 1.5
baths, nice size kitchen and laundry
room needs a little TLC
$28,500
Give Us A Call!
Call Kristie
Or Heather
at The
Borger
News-Herald
To Advertise
Your Realty
Here!!
806-273-5611
Or Come By
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx
79007
The Latest
Listings
delivered
to your
door.
The Borger News-Herald is your key
to a successful home search. From new
homes and local properties in every
price range. Our Real Estate section can
help open the door to your next home.
3B
WEEKEND,
JANUARY 18-19, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Business
Gary Schneck, Scott Mills, Beverly Creacy, and Brock Sherwood
BORGER EDWARD JONES FINANCIAL ADVISORS
Should you take a pension buyout?
Stephen Horst Diana Jack
The impact of health care costs on Social Security
Have you recently re-
ceived a pension buyout of-
fer? If so, you need to de-
cide if you should take the
buyout, which could provide
you with a potentially large
lump sum, or continue ac-
cepting your regular pension
payments for the rest of your
life. It’s a big decision.
Clearly, there’s no “one
size fts all” answer — your
choice needs to be based on
your individual circumstanc-
es. So, as you weigh your
options, you’ll need to con-
sider a variety of key issues,
including the following:
Estate considerations
— Your pension payments
generally end when you and/
or your spouse dies, which
means your children will
get none of the money. But
if you were to roll the lump
sum into an Individual Re-
tirement Account (IRA), and
you don’t exhaust it in your
lifetime, you could still have
something to leave to your
family members.
Taxes — If you take
the lump sum and roll the
funds into your IRA, you
control how much you’ll be
taxed and when, based on
the amounts you choose to
withdraw and the date you
begin taking withdrawals.
(Keep in mind, though, that
you must start taking a des-
ignated minimum amount
of withdrawals from a tradi-
tional IRA when you reach
age 70½. Withdrawals taken
before age 59½ are subject
to taxes and penalties.) But if
you take a pension, you may
have less control over your
income taxes, which will be
based on your monthly pay-
ments.
Infation — You could
easily spend two or three de-
cades in retirement — and
during that time, infation
can really add up. To cite just
one example, the average
cost of a new car was $7,983
in 1982; 30 years later, that
fgure is $30,748, according
to TrueCar.com. If your pen-
sion checks aren’t indexed
for infation, they will lose
purchasing power over time.
If you rolled over your lump
sum into an IRA, however,
you could put the money into
investments offering growth
potential, keeping in mind,
of course, that there are no
guarantees.
Cash fow — If you’re
already receiving a monthly
pension, and you’re spend-
ing every dollar you receive
just to meet your living ex-
penses, you may be better
off by keeping your pension
payments intact. If you took
the lump sum and converted
it into an IRA, you can with-
draw whatever amount you
want (as long as you meet
the required minimum distri-
butions), but you’ll have to
avoid withdrawing so much
that you’ll eventually run out
of money.
Confdence in future pen-
sion payments — From time
to time, companies are forced
to reduce their pension obli-
gations due to unforeseen cir-
cumstances. You may want to
take this into account as you
decide whether to continue
taking your monthly pension
payments, but it’s an issue
over which you have no con-
trol. On the other hand, once
your lump sum is in an IRA,
you have control over both
the quality and diversifca-
tion of your investment dol-
lars. However, the trade-off
is that investing is subject to
various risks, including loss
of principal.
Before selecting either
the lump sum or the monthly
pension payments, weigh all
the factors carefully to make
sure your decision fts into
your overall fnancial strat-
egy. With a choice of this im-
portance, you will probably
want to consult with your
fnancial and tax advisors.
Ultimately, you may fnd that
this type of offer presents
you with a great opportunity
— so take the time to con-
sider your options.
For many retirees and
their families, Social Secu-
rity provides a dependable
source of income. In fact,
for the majority of retirees,
Social Security accounts for
at least half of their income
(Source: Fast Facts & Fig-
ures About Social Security,
2013). However, more of
that income is being spent
on health-related costs each
year, leaving less available
for other retirement expens-
es.
The importance of So-
cial Security
Social Security is impor-
tant because it provides a
retirement income you can’t
outlive. In addition, ben-
efts are available for your
spouse based on your beneft
amount during your lifetime,
and at your death in the form
of survivor’s benefts. And,
these benefts typically are
adjusted for infation (but
not always; there was no
cost-of-living increase for
the years 2010 and 2011).
That’s why for many people,
Social Security is an espe-
cially important source of
retirement income.
Rising health-care costs
You might assume that
when you reach age 65,
Medicare will cover most of
your health-care costs. But
in reality, Medicare pays for
only a portion of the cost for
most health-care services,
leaving a potentially large
amount of uninsured medi-
cal expenses.
How much you’ll ulti-
mately spend on health care
generally depends on when
you retire, how long you
live, your health status, and
the cost of medical care in
your area. Nevertheless, in-
surance premiums for Medi-
care Part B (doctor’s visits)
and Part D (drug beneft),
along with Medigap insur-
ance, could cost hundreds
of dollars each month for a
married couple. In addition,
there are co-pays and de-
ductibles to consider (e.g.,
after paying the frst $147
in Part B expenses per year,
you pay 20% of the Medi-
care-approved amount for
services thereafter). Your
out-of-pocket yearly costs
for medical care, medica-
tions, and insurance could
easily exceed thousands of
dollars.
Medicare’s impact on
Social Security
Most people age 65 and
older receive Medicare.
Part A is generally free, but
Parts B and D have monthly
premiums. The Part B pre-
mium generally is deducted
from your Social Security
check, while Part D has sev-
eral payment alternatives. In
2013, the premium for Part
B was $104.90 per month.
The cost for Part D coverage
varies, but usually averages
between $30 and $60 per
month (unless participants
qualify for low-income as-
sistance). Part B premiums
have increased each year
and are expected to continue
to do so, while Part D pre-
miums vary by plan, benefts
provided, deductibles, and
coinsurance amounts. And,
if you enroll late for either
Part B or D, your cost may
be permanently increased.
In addition, Medicare
Parts B and D are means
tested, meaning that if your
income exceeds a predeter-
mined income cap, a sur-
charge is added to the basic
premium. For example, an
individual with a modifed
adjusted gross income be-
tween $85,000 and $170,000
may pay an additional 40%
for Part B and an additional
$11.60 per month for Part
D.
Note: Part C, Medicare
Advantage plans, are of-
fered by private companies
that contract with Medicare
to provide you with all your
Part A and Part B benefts,
often including drug cover-
age. While the premiums
for these plans are not sub-
tracted from Social Security
income, they are increasing
annually as well.
The bottom line
The combination of ris-
ing Medicare premiums
and out-of-pocket health-
care costs can use up more
of your fxed income, such
as Social Security. As a re-
sult, you may need to spend
more of your retirement sav-
ings than you expected for
health-related costs, leaving
you unable to afford large,
unanticipated expenses.
Depending on your circum-
stances, spending more on
health-care costs, including
Medicare, may leave you
with less available for other
everyday expenditures and
reduce your nest egg, which
can impact the quality of
your retirement.
###
This information is pro-
vided for informational pur-
poses only. The information
is intended to be generic in
nature and should not be ap-
plied or relied upon in any
particular situation without
the advice of your tax, legal
and/or your fnancial advi-
sor. Neither Ameriprise Fi-
nancial nor its advisors or
representatives provide tax
or legal advice. The views
expressed may not be suit-
able for every situation.
Ameriprise Financial Ser-
vices, Inc. Member FINRA
and SIPC.
TexSCAN Week of
January 19, 2014
DRIVERS
BEST LEASE PURCHASE in the industry
with 99¢/gallon diesel fuel, $100 weekly
bonus, new trucks, top pay and great
freight lanes. Hirshbach; 1-888-514-6005
or www.drive4hml.com
CDL TRUCK DRIVER Training in Burle-
son, TX. Small classes, low cost, financ-
ing available. Millis Training Institute for
more details call: 1-800-937-0880 www.
millistransfer.com
DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED in Hutchins,
TX. Become a driver for Covenant Transport!
No experience needed. CDL training gets you
ready ASAP! Earn $750/week + benefits!
1-888-778-0460
EXPERI ENCE FLATBED DRI VERS:
Regional opportunities now open with
plenty of freight & great pay! 800-277-0212
or driveforprime.com
PAI D CDL Tr ai ni ng! No exper i ence
needed. Stevens Transport will sponsor
the cost of your CDL training. Earn up
to $40K first year and $70K third year.
Excellent benefits, 1-888-726-4130, www.
becomeadriver.com. EOE
DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED now! Learn to
drive for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per
week. No experience needed. Get your CDL
and pre-hire now. 1-888-734-6710
JOI N AVERI TT TODAY! Dedi cat ed
CDL-A drivers get full-benefits and steady
hometime. 1-855-430-8869. Apply online:
AverittCareers.com, EOE
OWNER OPERATORS - $2,500 sign-on
bonus! Home weekends and throughout
the week. Dedicated, year ‘round recession-
proof freight. 100% fuel surcharge to driv-
ers. Fuel discounts + more. CDL Class A
+ 1-year driving. Call Ty 1-866-478-9977.
DriveForCardinal.com
OWNER OPERATORS average $3K/week!
Be out up to 14-days, enjoy guaranteed
home time! Weekly settlements. Cardinal
Greatwide pays loaded/unloaded. Class-A
CDL & 1-year driving experience. Fleet
owners welcome. Operate under your own
authority or ours! Call Matt; 1-866-915-6177.
DriveForCardinal.com
PARTNERS IN EXCELLENCE OTR drivers,
APU equipped, pre-pass, EZ-pass, passen-
ger policy. 2012 and newer equipment. 100%
NO touch. Butler Transport 1-800-528-7825;
www.butlertransport.com
HELP WANTED
WORK AND TRAVEL 6 openi ngs
now, $20+ per hour. Ful l -ti me travel ,
pai d trai ni ng, transportati on provi ded.
**BBB accredi ted/ appl y onl i ne www.
protekchemi cal .com or www.mytravel -
j ob.com. 1-208-830-9993
MEDICAL
MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES Needed!
Become a medical office assistant now!
Online job training gets you ready. Job
placement when program completed. Call
for details! 1-888-368-1638; ayers.edu/
disclosures.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $4897.00. Make
and save money with your own bandmill.
Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to
ship. Free information/DVD, www.Norwood-
Sawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N
SAFE TUBS
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for seniors,
bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by
Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets with
less than 4-inch step-in. Wide door, anti-slip
floors, American made, installation included.
Call 1-888-960-2587 for $750 Off
TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS begin here. Become
an Aviation Maintenance Technician. FAA
approved training.Financial aid if qualified.
Housing available, job placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. Dallas:1-
800-475-4102 or Houston: 1-800-743-1392
YOU CAN BECOME an expert in HVAC
installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Insti-
tute Online HVAC education in as little as
12-months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or
go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.com
REAL ESTATE
ABSOLUTELY THE BEST VIEW Lake
Medina/Bandera, 1/4 acre tract, central W/S/E,
RV, M/H or house OK only $830 down, $235
month (12.91%/10yr), Guaranteed financing,
more information call 1-830-460-8354
ACREAGE REPO with septic tank, pool, pier,
ramp. Owner finance. Granbury 1-210-422-3013
AFFORDABLE RESORT LIVING on Lake
Fork. RV and manufactured housing OK! Guar-
anteed financing with 10% down. Lots starting
as low as $6900. Call Josh, 1-903-878-7265
LOOKING TO SALE land? Reach over
2-million readers for one low price in the
Texas Statewide Advertising Network.
Contact this newspaper or call 1-800-749-
4793 for more detail.
348 ACRES, 45 miles west of Del Rio,
spectacular views of the Rio Grande. Rough
canyons/draws. Hunt deer, dove, quail.
$241,866, low down. 1-210-734-4009. www.
westerntexasland.com
$106 MONTH BUYS land for RV, MH
or cabi n. Gat ed ent ry, $690 down,
($6900/10.91%/7yr) 90-days same as cash,
Guaranteed financing, 1-936-377-3235
VACATION
WEEKEND GETAWAY available on Lake
Fork, Lake Livingston or Lake Medina.
Rooms fully furnished! Gated community with
clubhouse, swimming pool and boat ramps.
Call for more information: 1-903-878-7265,
1-936-377-3235 or 1-830-460-8354
Extend your advertising reach with TexSCAN, your Statewide Classified Ad Network.
NOTICE: While most advertisers are reputable, we cannot guarantee products or services advertised. We urge readers to use caution and when in doubt,
contact the Texas Attorney General at 1-800-621-0508 or the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP. The FTC web site is www.ftc.gov/bizop
Run Your Ad In TexSCAN!
To Order: Call this Newspaper
direct, or call Texas Press Service
at 1-800-749-4793 Today!
Statewide Ad ..................
$
550
290 Newspapers, 871,154 Circulation
North Region Only ......
$
250
93 Newspapers, 297,505 Circulation
South Region Only .....
$
250
97 Newspapers, 366,627 Circulation
West Region Only .......
$
250
98 Newspapers, 205,950 Circulation
First Monday Trade Days
Canton, Texas
“Home of the World Famous First Monday Trade Days”
877-462-7467
www.visitcantontx.com
Over 7000 Vendor Spaces
Indoor Antiques
Collectibles Market
with A/C and Heat
Free Admission
Clean Restrooms
RV hook-ups
Jan. 30 - Feb. 2 • Feb. 27 - Mar. 2
April 3-6 • May 1-4
Open Thursday - Sunday before the FIRST MONDAY of every month
Sunup ‘til Sundown, Rain or Shine. Pavilions officially open Friday.
Shopping Adventure
As Big As TEXAS!
FLEA MARKET
Oldest & Largest in the USA!
®
Copyright ©2013 Mission Pharmacal Company.
All rights reserved. CAL-13902
Calcet
®
is designed to help
stop low calcium leg cramps.
Just ask your pharmacist.
Petite Tablet
with
More Calcium
& Vitamin D3
Helps fight
leg cramps*
For those
with milk allergies
Fights
osteoporosis
*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug
Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure,
or prevent any disease.
Go Painlessly
®
with
THERA-GESIC.
Maximum strength
analgesic creme for
temporary relief from:
• Joint and Muscle
soreness
• Arthritis
• Back aches
T
H
G
-1
3
9
0
2
4B
WEEKEND
JANUARY 18-19, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Community Menus
Borger ISD
Page 1 HIGH SCHOOL BREAKFAST (9-12)
JANUARY 2014
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Dec 5, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
3
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
6
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
7
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
8
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
9
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
10
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
13
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
14
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
15
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
16
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
17
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
20
HOLIDAY
21
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
22
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
23
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RED GRAPES
MILK VARIETY
24
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
27
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
28
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
29
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
30
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
31
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 HIGH SCHOOL LUNCH (9th-12th)
JANUARY 2014
Check your student's meal account online at www.myschoolbuck.com monitor their
purchases & make payments.
Dec 5, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2
BEEFY MACARONI
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE JUICE
BREAD STICKS
MILK VARIETY
3
PIZZA VARIETY
OR
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
SPANISH RICE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BROCCOLI BITES
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
6
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
POTATO CHIPS
OR
BURRITO
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
7
CRISPY TACOS
SPANISH RICE
OR
SOUTHWEST CHICKEN CASS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CINNAMON APPLESAUCE
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
8
CHICKEN NUGGETS
OR
SALISBURY STEAK
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
BROWNIE COOKIE
MILK VARIETY
Brown Gravy
9
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
OR
BREADED PORK CHOP
BREAD STICKS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
PEACH CUPS
ORANGE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
CHOCOLATE PUDDING
10
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
OR
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
CHILLED PEARS
CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
MILK VARIETY
13
CHICKEN QUESADILLA
OR
BBQ BEEF ON BUN
BLACK BEANS
BABY CARROTS
ORANGE QUARTERS
ORANGE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
14
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
SPANISH RICE
OR
HAM & CHEESE SPUD
BREAD STICKS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED CORN
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALAD
APPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
15
BEEF STEAK FINGERS
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
16
CHICKEN PENNE
BREAD STICKS
OR
PIZZA DIPPERS
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
APPLE SMILES
CHOCOLATE PUDDING
MILK VARIETY
17
PIZZA VARIETY
OR
HAMBURGER
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
20
NO SCHOOL TODAY
21
HAMBURGER
OR
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWICH
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
APPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
22
TANGERINE CHICKEN
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALAD
BROWN RICE
MILK VARIETY
23
TACO PIE
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
OR
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
SUNCHIPS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
24
CHICKEN PARMESAN
BREAD STICK
OR
CHEESE PIZZA
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS LUNCH (5th-8th)
JANUARY 2014
Check your student's meal account online at www.myschoolbucks.com monitor their
purchases & make payments.
Dec 5, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2
BEEFY MACARONI
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
3
PIZZA VARIETY
OR
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BROCCOLI BITES
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
6
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
OR
BURRITO
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
7
CRISPY TACOS
OR
SOUTHWEST CHICKEN CASS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CINNAMON APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
8
CHICKEN NUGGETS
OR
SALISBURY STEAK
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
Brown Gravy
9
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
OR
BREADED PORK CHOP
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
PEACH CUPS
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
10
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
OR
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
13
CHICKEN QUESADILLA
OR
BBQ BEEF ON BUN
BLACK BEANS
BABY CARROTS
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
14
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
OR
HAM & CHEESE SPUD
BREAD STICK
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED CORN
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
15
BEEF STEAK FINGERS
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLLS
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
MILK VARIETY
16
CHICKEN PENNE
BREAD STICK
OR
PIZZA DIPPERS
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
17
PIZZA VARIETY
OR
HAMBURGER
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
20
NO SCHOOL TODAY
21
HAMBURGER
OR
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWICH
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
22
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BROWN RICE
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALAD
MILK VARIETY
23
TACO PIE
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
OR
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
SUNCHIPS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
24
CHICKEN PARMESAN
BREAD STICK
OR
CHEESE PIZZA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
27
CHEESE ENCHILADA'S
OR
RIB B QUE ON BUN
corn chips
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
28
HOT DOG
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
OVEN FRIES
VEGGIE CUP
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
29
GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH
OR
PBJ,UNCRUSTABLE
VEGETABLE SOUP
BABY CARROTS
FRUIT CUP
MILK VARIETY
30
CHICKEN NUGGETS
OR
BAJA FISH STICKS
MACARONI AND CHEESE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
RICE KRISPIE TREAT
MILK VARIETY
31
HAMBURGER
OR
BURRITO
SEASONED CORN
BABY CARROTS
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 ELEMENTARY LUNCH (1st -4th)
JANUARY 2014
Check your student's meal account online at www.myschoolbuck.com monitor their
purchases & make payments.
Dec 5, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2
BEEFY MACARONI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
3
CHEESE PIZZA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
6
BURRITO
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
7
CRISPY TACOS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
RANCH STYLE BEANS
ROSIE APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
8
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
9
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
PEACH CUPS
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
10
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
13
PIZZA DIPPERS
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
14
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED CORN
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
15
BEEF STEAK FINGERS
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
16
BBQ BEEF ON BUN
BLACK BEANS
BABY CARROTS
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
17
PIZZA VARIETY
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
20
NO SCHOOL TODAY
21
HAMBURGER
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
22
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BROWN RICE
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALAD
MILK VARIETY
23
TACO PIE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
CINNAMON APPLES
SPANISH RICE
MILK VARIETY
24
CHEESE PIZZA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
27
RIB B QUE ON BUN
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
28
HOT DOG
OVEN FRIES
VEGGIE CUP
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
29
GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH
VEGETABLE SOUP
BABY CARROTS
FRUIT CUP
MILK VARIETY
30
CHICKEN NUGGETS
MACARONI AND CHEESE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
RICE KRISPIE TREAT
MILK VARIETY
31
HAMBURGER
SEASONED CORN
BABY CARROTS
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 PAUL BELTON LUNCH
JANUARY 2014
Dec 5, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2
BEEFY MACARONI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
3
PIZZA VARIETY
BROCCOLI BITES
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
6
BURRITO
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
7
CRISPY TACOS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
ROSIE APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
8
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
9
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
PEACH CUPS
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
10
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
13
PIZZA DIPPERS
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
14
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED CORN
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
15
BEEF STEAK FINGERS
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLLS
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
MILK VARIETY
16
BBQ BEEF ON BUN
BLACK BEANS
BABY CARROTS
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
17
PIZZA VARIETY
BROCCOLI BITES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
20
NO SCHOOL TODAY
21
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALAD
BROWN RICE
MILK VARIETY
22
HAMBURGER
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
23
TACO PIE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
24
CHEESE PIZZA
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
27
RIB B QUE ON BUN
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
28
HOT DOG
OVEN FRIES
VEGGIE CUP
FRESH FRUIT
MILK VARIETY
29
GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH
VEGETABLE SOUP
BABY CARROTS
FRUIT CUP
MILK VARIETY
30
CHICKEN NUGGETS
MACARONI AND CHEESE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
RICE KRISPIE TREAT
MILK VARIETY
31
HAMBURGER
SEASONED CORN
BABY CARROTS
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD Breakfast Menu
Borger High School Lunch Menu
Borger Middle School Lunch Menu
Borger Elementary School Lunch Menu
Paul Belton Lunch Menu
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
Jan. 6 Jan. 7 Jan. 8 Jan. 9 Jan. 10
BEEF/CHEESE
CHALUPAS
GARDEN SALAD w
ranch dressing
SALSA
REFRIED BEANS
APPLESAUCE
VARIETY MILK
COUNTRY FRIED STEAK
MASH POTATOES w
GRAVY
GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLL
STRAWBERRY CUP
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN FAJITAS w
peppers & onion garnish
PINTO BEANS
CORN
ORANGE SLICES
SALSA
VARIETY MILK
FISH
HUSH PUPPIE
SWEET POTATO FRIES
COLESLAW
SALSA
SLICED PEACHES
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN SPAGHETTI
GARDEN SALAD w ranch
dressing
APPLE SLICES
BREADSTICK
BABY CARROTS
VARIETY MILK
Jan. 13 Jan. 14 Jan. 15 Jan. 16 Jan. 17
CORN DOG
BAKED BEANS
TOMATO/CUCUMBER
CUP
APPLE-PINEAPPLE
D'LITE
VARIETY MILK
NACHOS
REFRIED BEANS
GARDEN SALAD w ranch
dressing
ORANGE HALVES
LIME SHERBET CUP
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN SANDWICH
OVEN FRIES
FRESH VEGGIE CUP w
ranch dressing
FRUITY GELATIN
VARIETY MILK
BEEFY MACARONI
GARDEN SALAD w
ranch dressing
BABY CARROTS
FRESH GRAPES
BREADSTICK
VARIETY MILK
PIZZA
BROCCOLI SALAD
CORN
FRESH FRUIT BOWL
VARIETY MILK
Jan. 20 Jan. 21 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan. 24
HAMBURGER
let./tom./pickle garnish
POTATO ROUNDS
RANCH STYLE BEANS
DICED PEARS
VARIETY MILK
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BROWN RICE
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
VARIETY MILK
FRITO PIE
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
GARDEN SALAD w ranch
dressing
SALSA
CINNAMON APPLES
VARIETY MILK
STUFFED BBQ POTATO
BABY CARROTS
TEXAS TOAST
FRESH FRUIT BOWL
VARIETY MILK
PIZZA
SALAD
GREEN BEANS
APPLE SLICES
VARIETY MILK
Jan. 27 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan. 30 Jan. 31
GRILLED
HAM/CHEESE
SANDWICH
BROCCOLI BITES
GARDEN SALAD
FRESH ORANGES
VARIETY MILK
TACOS
SPANISH RICE
GARDEN SALAD w ranch
dressing
PINTO BEANS
SALSA
CINN./APPLESAUCE
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN NUGGETS
POTATOES w/GRAVY
CARROT COINS
STRAWBERRIES &
BANANAS
HOT ROLL
VARIETY MILK
SPAGHETT &
MEATBALLS
GARDEN SALAD w
ranch dressing
GREEN BEANS
SLICED PEACHES
VARIETY MILK
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
SANDWICH BAR: Grades 3rd - 12th (everyday choice)
3rd - 12 th Grade: TURKEY, HAM SANDWICH
BAKED POTATO
SALAD/SALAD DRESSING
FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
JANUARY LUNCH MENU PK-8
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
Jan. 6 Jan. 7 Jan. 8 Jan. 9 Jan. 10
CINNAMON ROLL w
BACON
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
OR
CINNAMON POP TART
HASH BROWNS
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST PIZZA
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
WAFFLES/ w SAUSAGE
OR
ANIMAL CRACKERS w
STRING CHEESE
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
CHEESE OMELET
OR
VARIETY CEREAL W/
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
Jan. 13 Jan. 14 Jan. 15 Jan. 16 Jan. 17
OATMEAL w
BLUEBERY MUFFIN
OR
OATMEAL ROUND w
YOGURT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN BISCUIT
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
PANCAKE ON
STICK/SYRUP
OR
POP TART
HASH BROWNS
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
ANIMAL CRACKERS w
STRING CHEESE
OR
ENGLISH MUFFIN w
egg/cheese/ham
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST TACO
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
Jan. 20 Jan. 21 Jan. 22 Jan. 23 Jan. 24
FRENCH TOAST
STICKS/SYRUP
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
SCRAMBLED EGGS w
BISCUITS & GRAVY
OR
ANIMAL CRACKERS w
STRING CHEESE
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST CLUB
OR
POP TART
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN n WAFFLES
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST BURRITO
OR
OATMEAL ROUND w
YOGURT
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
Jan. 27 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan. 30 Jan. 31
PANCAKES w/BACON
OR
POP TART
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
ENGLISH MUFFIN w/
egg/cheese/ham
OR
ANIMAL CRACKERS w/
STRING CHEESE
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
OATMEAL w/
cinnamon toast
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w/
texas toast
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
SCRAMBLED EGGS w/
BISCUITS AND GRAVY
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST BURRITO
OR
OATMEAL ROUND w/
yogurt
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
JANUARY BREAKFAST MENU
Plemons-Stinnett-phillips
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri S
1
HOLIDAY
2
HOLIDAY
3
HOLIDAY
4
5 6
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Pancakes w/bacon
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
7
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Eagle Breakfast Sand-
wich
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
8
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Biscuits w/ Gravy
Scrambled Eggs
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
9
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Brown Sugar Oatmeal
Cinnamon Texas Toast
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
10
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Breakfast Burrito
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
1
1
12 13
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Chicken-n-Waffles
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
14
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Oatmeal Muffin Squares
Yogurt
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
15
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Texas Toast
Scrambled Eggs
Sausage Patty
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
16
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Breakfast Club
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
17
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Biscuits w/Gravy
Sausage Patty or Link
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
19 20
No school
Staff Workday
21
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Waffles w/ Syrup
Sausage Patty
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
22
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Breakfast Quiche w/
Texas Toast ELEM.
Oatmeal & Texas Toast JH/HS
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
16
Cereal & Texas Toast or
French Toast Bake
Bacon
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
17
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Banana Bread Squares
Cream of Wheat
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
1
8
26 27
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Sausage Kolache
Oven Roasted Potatoes
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
28
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Cheddar Omlette Wrap
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
29
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Breakfast Pizza
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
30
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Waffles & Sausage
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
31
Cereal & Texas Toast or
Cinnamon Roll
Bacon
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Vareity
January 2014 Breakfast
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
1 2 3
6
Cheese Enchiladas (all campuses)
BBQ Rib Sandwich w/chips (JH/
HS)
Refried Beans
Garden Salad
Salsa
Hot Cinnamon Apples
7
Hot Dogs (all campuses)
Stromboli (JH/HS)
Potato Rounds
Fresh Veggie Cup
Fresh Fruit
Chocolate Chip Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
8
Grilled Cheese Sandwich (all )
PBJ (JH/HS)
Vegetable Soup
Baby Carrots
Fruit Cup
Milk Variety
9
Chicken Nuggets (all campuses)
Meatball Sub (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Savory Green Beans
Apple Slices
Rice Crispy Treat
Milk Variety
10
Hamburger/Cheese (all campuses)
Beef/Bean Burrito (JH/HS)
Seasoned Corn or Cobbettes
Baby Carrots
Sliced Peaches
Milk Variety
13
Beef & Bean Chalupas (all )
Chicken Quesadilla (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Refried Beans
Applesauce
Milk Variety
14
Country Fried Steak (all campuses)
Chicken Nuggets (JH/HS)
Mashed Potatoes w/gravy
Savory Green Beans
Roll
Strawberry Cup
Milk Variety
15
Chicken Fajitas (all campuses)
Pepper & onion garnish
Turkey & Cheese Wrap (JH/HS)
Charro Beans
Seasoned Corn
Orang Smiles
Milk Variety
16
Chicken Spaghetti (all)
Popcorn Chicken (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Baby Carrots
Apple Slices
Breadsticks
Milk Variety
17
Fish Strips (all campuses)
Hamburger/Cheese (JH/HS)
Sweet Potato Fries
Coleslaw
Peaches
Milk Variety
20
NO SCHOOL
STAFF WORKDAY
21
Corn Dog (all campuses)
Pizza Dippers (JH/HS)
Baked Beans
Tomato & Cucumber Cup
Apple-Pineapple D’Lite
Milk Variety
22
Beefy Queso w/chips (all campuses
PBJ Sandwich (JH/HS)
Refried Beans
Garden Salad
Orange Smiles
Lime Sherbet (HS)
Milk Variety
23
Chicken Sandwich (all )
Beef/Bean Burrito (JH/HS)
Oven Fries
Fresh Veggie Cup
Fruity Gelatin
Milk Variety
24
Meaty Mac (all campuses)
Chicken Nugget w/gravy (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Baby Carrots
Fresh Grapes
Breadstick
Milk Variety
27 28 29 30 31
January 2014 Lunch
Sanford-Fritch
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2
Hamburger/Cheeseburger (all)
Chicken Sandwich (JH/HS)
Hamburger Garnish
Potato Rounds
Western Beans
Diced Pears
Milk Variety
3
Orange Chicken (all campus)
w/Brown Rice
Pig in a Blanket (JH/HS)
Steamed Carrots and
Broccoli
Pineapple Tidbits
Milk Variety
4
Tex-Mex Stack (all campuses)
Spanish Rice
Refried Beans
Toasted Ham/Cheese (JH/HS)
w/ Multi-Grain Chips (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Hot Cinnamon Apples
Milk Variety
5
Stuffed BBQ Potatoes (all campus)
Texas Toast (1 K-8 2 9-12)
Chicken Fajita Salad (JH/HS)
w/ Tortilla Chips (JH/HS)
Spanish Rice (JH/HS)
Baby Carrots
Fresh fruit Bowl
Milk Variety
6
Chicken Parmesan (all campuses)
Breadstick ( 1 K-8 2 9-12)
Cheese Pizza (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Savory Green Beans
Fresh Apple Slices
Milk Variety
7
8 9
Toasted Ham/Cheese (all campus)
Beef/Bean Burrito (JH/HS)
Broccoli Bites
Garden Salad
Oranges Smiles
Milk Variety
10
Crispy Taco (all campuses) 2
Southwest Chicken (JH/HS)
w/ Tortilla Chips
Garden Salad
Charro Beans
Cinn. Applesauce
Milk Variety
11
Chicken Nuggets (all campuses)
Salisbury Steak (JH/HS)
Mashed Potatoes
Carrot Coins
Strawberries & Bananas
Roll
Brownie Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
12
Spaghetti w/ Meatballs (all)
Breaded Pork Chop (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Savory Green Beans
Sliced Peaches
Breadsticks ( 1 K-8 2 9-12)
Pudding (HS)
Milk Variety
13
Turkey Cheese Wraps (all)
Hot Dog (JH/HS)
Sweet Potato Fries
Cucumber Dippers
Fresh Fruit
Chocolate Chip Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
14
15 16
Chicken Alfredo (all campuses)
Breadstick 2 (HS)
2 Pizza Dippers (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Baby carrots
Apple Slices
Breadsticks ( 1 K-8 2 9-12)
Milk Variety Pudding ( HS)
17
Ultimate Taco Salad (all )
Baked Potato (JH/HS)
w/ Ham & Cheese
Breadstick (JH 1 HS 2)
Garden Salad
Seasoned Corn
Snowball Salad
Milk Variety
18
Steak Fingers (all campuses)
Chicken Nuggets (JH/HS)
Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy
Savory Green Beans
Apple-Pineapple D’lite
Roll (HS)
Milk Variety
19
Chicken Quesadilla (all campuses)
BBQ on a bun (JH/HS)
Black Beans
Baby Carrots
Orange Smiles
Milk Variety
20
Pizza (all campuses)
Hamburger/Cheeseburger (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Fresh Veggie Cup
Mixed Fruit
Milk Variety
21
22 23
HOLIDAY
24
HOLIDAY
25
HOLIDAY
26
HOLIDAY
27
HOLIDAY
29 30
HOLIDAY
31
HOLIDAY
December 2013 Lunch
Opportunities Inc.
Menu
Monday, January 20
Polish sausage or chicken
tenders. Red cabbage with
sweet and sour sauce, Har-
vard beets, or creamed peas.
German potato salad. Black
forest parfait. Whole wheat
roll with margarine. Milk,
coffee, tea or water.
Tuesday, January 21
King Ranch casserole
or spaghetti with meat
sauce. Green beans.,
glazed carrots, or pinto
beans. Lettuce salad.
Sugar cookie with pine-
apple rings. Wheat roll
with margarine. 2%
milk, coffee, tea, or wa-
ter.
Wednesday, January 22
Smothered steak or la-
sagna. Mashed pota-
toes, mixed greens, or
hominy. Macaroni salad.
Peach short cake. Wheat
roll with margarine. 2%
milk, coffee, tea, or wa-
ter.
Thursday, January 23
BBQ chicken or beef
roast. Smothered pota-
toes, seasoned spinach,
or blackeyed peas. Car-
rot salad. Sliced apples.
Wheat roll or born
bread with margarine.
2% milk, coffee, tea, or
water.
Friday, January 24
Pollock wedge with
lemon slice or chicken
fried steak. Lima beans,
potato wedges, or but-
tered corn. Cole slaw
with raisins. Lemon
cookie. Wheat roll or
corn bread with marga-
rine. 2% milk, coffee,
tea, or water.
Activities
Monday, January 20
Borger Duplicate
Bridge
1:00 - 5:00pm
Dominoes and pool any-
time
Tuesday, January 21
Borger Creative Arts -
9:00 a.m.
Borger Duplicate Bridge
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Letter Carrier’s Meeting
5:30 p.m.
Dominoes and pool any-
time
Wednesday, January 22
Art Class - 9:00 am to
11:30 am
Dominoes and pool any-
time
Thursday, January 23
Interim Home Health-
care - blood pressure, etc
11:00am to 12:00 noon
Dominoes and pool any-
time
Friday, January 24
Dominoes and pool any-
time
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
Weekend January 18 & 19, 2014.pdf16.91 MB
View more articles in:
The 2015 football season is just around the corner, and the Borger football program will begin...
Day three of the Borger football camp resumed at Bulldog Stadium today. The camp will run through...
Day one of the Borger Football Camp began here in Borger at Bulldog Stadium on Monday. Look for...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes