Skip to main content

weekend February 15 & 16, 2014

Unpublished

February 17, 2014

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

GEORGETOWN –
The Offce of the Attor-
ney General’s Internet
Crimes Against Children
(OAG ICAC) Task Force
hosted a training con-
ference in Williamson
County this week for law
enforcement agencies
that have affliated with
the OAG’s ICAC pro-
gram.
Law enforcement of-
fcers who serve in exist-
ing and newly acquired
ICAC affliate agencies
around the state – includ-
ing Bastrop County, Lago
Vista and Lampasas – at-
tended this week’s train-
ing conference. Law en-
forcement personnel from
the Texas Department of
Public Safety and Austin
Police Department were
also in attendance.
OAG ICAC Task
Force offcers opened the
conference Tuesday and
provided basic investi-
gative instruction about
uncovering online ex-
ploitation crimes. OAG
offcers also discussed
ICAC operational stan-
dards to ensure that all
affliate agencies comply
with ICAC procedures.
The new affliates also re-
ceived information about
grant funding, federal
law and obtaining search
warrants related to child
exploitation crimes.
The conference’s
second day focused on
Supporting Heroes in
Mental Health Founda-
tional Training (SHIFT).
An ICAC offcer’s daily
work often subjects the
offcer to viewing il-
licit child sexual abuse
materials such as child
pornography – graphic
images that cause irre-
vocable harm not only
to the child victims, but
also to the law enforce-
ment offcers who have to
view the violations in or-
der to prosecute the child
predators who are trading
the images. Wednesday’s
SHIFT program, present-
ed by the Innocent Justice
Foundation, trained af-
fliate agencies’ offcers
and supervisors how to
recognize and cope with
serious negative effects
caused by viewing harm-
ful child sexual abuse
materials.
The Texas Attorney
General’s Offce works
closely with law enforce-
ment authorities state-
wide to investigate and
prosecute child sexual
predators. In 2006, the
U.S. Department of Jus-
tice designated the At-
torney General’s Offce
as ICAC Task Force
for the South Texas Re-
gion. As the home of a
federally-funded ICAC
Task Force, the Attorney
General’s Offce receives
grant funding from the
Justice Department for
several peace offcers.
Child predators arrested
by the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Offce have been
prosecuted in both state
and federal courts.
To fnd out more about
the Texas Attorney Gen-
eral’s Internet Crimes
Against Children Task
Force and Attorney Gen-
eral Greg Abbott’s ongo-
ing efforts to crack down
on sexual predators, visit
the agency’s website at
www.texasattorneygeneral.gov.
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
Your Local Weather
Fri
2/14
58/39
A few clouds
from time to
time. High
58F. Winds
NNE at 15 to
25 mph.
Sat
2/15
76/37
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
upper 30s.
Sun
2/16
75/50
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
low 50s.
Mon
2/17
60/40
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
low 40s.
Tue
2/18
71/44
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 70s and
lows in the
mid 40s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
“He had to accept the fate of every
newcomer to a small town where
there are plenty of tongues that
gossip and few minds that think.”
Victor Hugo
Stay
informed
of local news, weather,
sports, and other fun
and interesting events
around
Hutchinson County at
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Community
Community
Service Directory
Classifeds
Sports
Sports
Business
Menus
2A
3A
4A
5A
6A
7A
8A
9A
1B
2B
3B
4B
AG’s Internet Crimes Against
Children force trains new affiliates
Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Alexis
Yussell
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
Like us on Facebook for breaking
news and the latest sports scores!
Scott Mills, AAMS
®
Financial Advisor
421 N. Deahl
Borger, Texas 79007
806-274-5475
Beverly Creacy, AAMS
®
Financial Advisor
811 S. Cedar
Borger, Texas 79007
806-274-2733
Brock Sherwood
Financial Advisor
1318 W. Wilson
Borger, Texas 79007
806-273-2634
Gary Schneck, CFP
Financial Advisor
905 N. Cedar
Borger, Texas 79007
806-274-7301
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 40, 14 Pages
Weekend, February 15-16, 2014
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2A
Obituaries
Local
Weather
What a wonderfully
warm weekend we have
on tap! We’ll see a good
amount of sun and tem-
peratures topping out well
in the 70s both days! The
wind won’t be too bad ei-
ther, mainly blowing be-
tween 10 and 20 mph. Get
outside and enjoy it!
From StormSearch 7
meteorologist
Brian James
SHERIFF OFFICE REPORT
2-12-14 An assault was investigated on Wilhelm in Stinnett.
2-13-14 Amy Libertowski was arrested for warrant #JP2-12-0383 for driving while license in-
valid, warrant # JP2-13-295 for driving while license invalid, and warrant #JP2-12-383F for failure
to appear.
Applications for emer-
gency farm loans for dam-
ages and losses caused by
drought beginning December
17, 2013 and continuing are
being accepted at the Farm
Service Agency (FSA) offce
located in Perryton, Texas.
Donley, Lipscomb and
Roberts Counties recently re-
ceived a disaster designation
as eligible for loans to cover
part of actual production and
physical losses under the “fast
track” authority. As contigu-
ous counties also named under
this disaster were Armstrong,
Briscoe, Carson, Collings-
worth, Gray, Hall, Hansford,
Hemphill, Hutchinson, Ochil-
tree and Wheeler Counties.
Farmers may be eligible
for loans of up to 100 per-
cent of their actual losses or
the operating loan needed
to continue the agricultural
business, whichever is less.
For farmers unable to obtain
credit from private commer-
cial lenders, the interest rate
is 2.875%.
As a general rule a farmer
or rancher must have suffered
at least a 30 percent loss of
crop production or suffered
any physical loss to be eli-
gible for an FSA emergency
loan under this disaster desig-
nation of drought conditions
beginning December 17,
2013. Producers participat-
ing in the Federal Crop In-
surance program will have to
consider proceeds from those
programs in determining their
production loss. Addition-
ally, any insurance proceeds
received by producers as a
result of the physical loss will
have to be considered in de-
termining their total loss.
Application for loans un-
der this emergency designa-
tion for physical or produc-
tion losses will be accepted
until October 14, 2014.
FSA is a credit agency of
the U.S. Department of Ag-
riculture. It is authorized to
provide disaster emergency
loans to recognized farm-
ers who work at and rely on
farming for a substantial part
of their living. Eligibility is
extended to individual farm-
ers who meet U.S. citizenship
requirements and to farming
partnerships, corporations or
cooperatives in which U.S.
citizenship requirements are
met by individuals holding a
majority interest.
For further information,
you may contact James M.
Heck at (806) 435-6597, ext. 4
or contact your local FSA of-
fce and they will direct you to
the Farm Loan Program offce
that handles your county. Ad-
ditional information regard-
ing Disaster Assistance Pro-
grams may be found online at
http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov.
FSA Accepting emergency loan applications
WICHITA FALLS – A
“Saving Our Trees” seminar
will be hosted by the Texas
A&M AgriLife Extension
Service in Wichita Falls on
March 1 at the River Bend
Nature Center, 2200 3rd St.
in Wichita Falls.
“The drought contin-
ues to negatively impact
our trees, and the AgriLife
Horticulture Committee
felt some education was es-
sential to help people learn
what they can do to save
our trees,” said David Graf,
AgriLife Extension agricul-
ture and natural resources
agent for Wichita County.
“It takes years to replace
trees, and anything we can
do to save them is a huge
beneft.”
Registration is free and
will begin at 8:30 a.m.; the
program will start at 9 a.m.
“We have two of the best
arborists in the region and a
renowned low water use ex-
pert offering free advice,”
Graf said. “We hope the
public takes advantage of
the opportunity and follows
through on some simple but
effective methods.”
Gregory David, a certi-
fed arborist from Muen-
ster, will present Evaluat-
ing Trees and Tips to Save
Them. He will be followed
by Charlie Carr, certifed ar-
borist in Wichita Falls, Deal-
ing with Day-to-Day Issues
– Insects, Disease, Pruning;
and Paul Dowlearn, profes-
sional nurseryman in Wich-
ita Falls, Stretching Soil
Moisture to the Max.
Following a question
and answer panel with the
morning speakers at 11:30
a.m., the audience will be
invited to take a River Bend
Nature Center tree tour,
Graf said.
For more information
or to register, contact the
AgriLife Extension offce
at 940-716-8610.
Saving Our Trees seminar
set for March 1 in Wichita Falls
©
2
0
1
4
R
e
e
d
e
r
V
o
g
e
l
A
d
v
e
r
tis
in
g
,
In
c
.
5col.x 4” M.C.we.want’14 1-24-14
314 S. Hedgecoke
in Borger
806-274-7333
Preneed Pl ans f rom Ot her Funeral Homes Honored • www. mi nt onchat wel l . com
Also Fritch & Panhandle
Conveni ent Locat i on wi t h Ampl e Of f - St reet Parki ng Comfor t abl e Fami l y Vi si t at i on Rooms
We want every family to feel welcome.
We gi ve t hanks to t he Lord for you,
For you have trul y bl essed us,
You reached out so wi l l i ngl y.
At a t i me t hat was tough.
It was such a wonderful bl essi ng,
And meant so very much,
For t he gi ft t hat you gave to us,
Was from a heart of l ove.
Your ki ndness wi l l never be forgot t en.
Jamie Hooks and Family
For the beautiful and kind
words. For the smiles and hugs.
For the delicious food and
encouraging cards.
For the many Prayers for all of
us. We Thank You So Much
from the bottom of our Hearts!
Albert Meyer, Judy Brandon,
Mary Morrow, Barbara Hernandez,
Kenneth Meyer & Families
Rebecca “Becky” Timmens, 72, went to be
with the Lord on February 14, 2014 in Fritch.
Memorial services are pending with Carmichael-Whatley Fu-
neral Directors of Pampa.
Mrs. Timmens was born June 28, 1941 in Spanishburg, West
Virginia. Becky was a resident of Amarillo for 20 years be-
fore moving to Fritch 12 years ago. She married Terry Tim-
mens on March 29, 1978 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She was a
homemaker and a devoted grandmother. She was preceded in
death by her parents, C. G. and Effe Bell; a son, Johnny Allen
Belcher; three grandchildren, Rebecca Smith, David Belcher and Johnny Allen Belcher, Jr;
and 12 brothers and sisters.
Survivors include her husband, Terry Timmens of the home; four daughters, Billie Ruth Tay-
lor and husband Earl of Keystone, West Virginia, Lydia Hethcox of Fritch, Terri Childress and
husband Tom of Weatherford, and Angela Adornetto of Follett; two sons, Greg “Cowboy”
Belcher and companion Amy Menefeld of Fritch, and Chuck Timmens and wife Pearl of Dub-
lin; a brother, John C. Bell and wife Janice of Hernando, MS; sister-in-law, Timara Graves, of
Arkansas; 21 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.
Memorials may be made to Accolade Hospice, 1224 N. Hobart, Pampa, Texas 79065.
Sign the on-line guest register at www.carmichael-whatley.com
(PAMPA) - Current hir-
ing opportunities and career
benefts for Correctional
Offcers with the Texas De-
partment of Criminal Jus-
tice will be presented at a
hiring seminar on Thursday,
February 20, 2014 at 6:30
p.m. at the Don R. Lane
Technical Career Center at
1601 W. Kentucky Ave. in
Pampa, Texas.
There are a number of
staff openings for both full
and part-time Correctional
Offcers at Pampa area pris-
on units.
A recruiter will be on
hand to explain the current
pay plan, outline the em-
ployee benefts and retire-
ment program, explain the
duties and requirements of
a Correctional Offcer and
answer questions.
A $4,000 recruiting bo-
nus is available for new
Correctional Offcers who
agree to work at one of 15
units across the state. For
more information about
employment with the
TDCJ, visit our web site at
www.tdcj.state.tx.us and
use the link marked Em-
ployment.
Beginning Correc-
tional Offcer pay starts at
$2,435.00 per month and
progresses at intervals to
$3,240.70 after 91 months
of service within C.O. clas-
sifcation.
Candidates must be at
least 18 years old and pos-
sess a high school diploma
or G.E.D. equivalent.
For more information,
call the TDCJ Human Re-
sources offce at (936) 437-
4098.
Career opportunities explained
at local TDCJ hiring seminar
We have several volun-
teer opportunities available
at Gentiva Hospice (formerly
Odyssey Hospice) Listed are
some volunteer opportunities
available at:
Support for patients. This
can include visiting, reading,
taking walks, writing letters,
bringing in music, supervis-
ing visits with pets, even mas-
sage therapy for volunteers
with the necessary skills.
Respite and support for
family members. Volunteers
can assist with shopping or
household maintenance, or
allow family caregivers the
opportunity to take care of
necessary errands and get
some time away from the
house. Family members also
appreciate a visit from a com-
passionate friend who under-
stands what they are going
through.
Child care assistance. This
can include help with babysit-
ting, picking up children from
school or providing necessary
transportation to club meet-
ings or sporting events and
practices. Volunteers have
also made invaluable contri-
butions with family pet care.
Bereavement support pro-
grams. Hospice volunteers
can work closely with the
hospice’s professional be-
reavement staff in duties that
range from assisting as a sup-
port group facilitator to serv-
ing refreshments and helping
with mailings to clients and
families.
Fund-raising and adminis-
trative work. A volunteer with
clerical skills can serve a hos-
pice by helping in the offce
with simple administrative
duties. Fundraising respon-
sibilities can range from pre-
paring mailings or thank you
letters to organizing fundrais-
ing events and contacting
possible donors.
If you are interested in
volunteering in your local
area please contact:
Alba Austin
Manager of Volunteer Ser-
vices - 806-372-7696
alba.austin@gentiva.com
Volunteer opportunities
at Gentive Hospice available
February 20
The Hutchinson County
Retired School Personnel As-
sociation will meet at Frank
Phillips College. Lunch will
be available in the cafeteria
at 11:30 and the program will
follow at 12:30 in the Gallery
Room. The program will be
presented by Gail Chambers,
Healthcare Chairperson, on
the topic of Jamestown- the
Starving Time. This prom-
ises to be an interesting and
intriguing presentation about
an historical event in our his-
tory. All retired public school
employees are invited and
encouraged to come.
February 28
Laurie McAfee from the Area
Agency on Aging in Amarillo
will be presenting an educa-
tional seminar on Medicare
Fraud and Abuse. 10 a.m.,
GPCH Board Room
March 1-2
Altrusa Club will hold its
Craft Show at the Aluminum
Dome Saturday and Sunday.
The show will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. on
Saturday and from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday.
Admission is free. Vendors
from over the area will fll
the Dome. The concession
stand will be open the entire
time with delicious snacks
available. Proceeds go to
support charitable causes in
the Hutchinson County.
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, Borger. Call 273-
5621 or 857-3947 for more
information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian Church,
200 S. Bryan, 6 p.m. Call
806-382-2449 or 806-273-
6017 for more information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist Church
Borger Fellowship Hall 9:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. child care
is provided. Call FBC 263-
5621 for information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medical
Field Employees in Hutchin-
son County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College Caf-
eteria in the Gallery Room
For more information call
Aileen Jackson at 274-9890or
Betty Jordon at 857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyteri-
an Church, 418 W. Coolidge,
8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more infor-
mation.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Ge-
nealogical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, second
foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6 p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you
write poetry and want to
connect with other poets to
connect with other poets, read
and get positive feedback we
would like to form a lunch
group and/or an evening
group. If interested please
call Mary Zan at 857-3670
for more information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for life
challenges, 6:30 p.m., That
One Place Community Cen-
ter, 212 E. Broadway, Fritch.
Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria Call
274-3321 for more informa-
tion.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9 a.m.
Call 886-0299 for more infor-
mation.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stinnett
Senior Citizen Building, 6:30
p.m. Call 878-2960 or 878-
3272 for more information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Ministry,
7 p.m. Call 857-3975 for
location.
Alibates Creek Indian Danc-
ers, 7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran
Church, 212 W. Jefferson.
Call 274-3239 for more infor-
mation.
VFW Post #1789 meets at the
VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room, 1 p.m. Call 467-5732
for more information.
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings, Op-
portunities Center, 11 a.m. to
noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce, 6:30
p.m. Call 806-878-4026.
Vietnam Veterans of America
Chapter 404, 403 S Cornell in
Fritch, 5:30 p.m. dinner and
6:00 meetings. Call 857-3950
for more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure screen-
ings, MAL’S Café, Stinnett, 8
a.m. to 9 a.m.
Phillips Alumni Association,
Frank Phillips College Gal-
lery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post 0671
meets at 7:30 pm at the
American Legion post next to
the Aluminum Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more infor-
mation.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art 10:30-
12 St. Andrews United Meth-
odist Church ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s welcome,
Doors open 5 pm, Cards sold
starting at 6 p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm, $14
each packet of 13 games or 6
papers for each of 13 games,
Additional papers half pack-
ets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more infor-
mation.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge, 7:30
p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost Chil-
dren Grief Support Group,
New U on Main Street, 7
p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more infor-
mation.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Second Thursdays
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen Sun-
shine Club, 12 noon for lunch
followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7 p.m.,
305 N. Deahl. Call 273-7127
or see fellowshipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
Fritch Sunshine Club, 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Mennonite
Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and blood
sugar screenings, United Su-
permarket, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class, 10
a.m., Golden Plains Commu-
nity Hospital Board Room.
Call 467-5718 or 467-5857
for more information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Call 878-2597 for more
information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor Home
Owners Assoc., 10 a.m., Club
House.
Marine Corps League Haw-
thorne Det. #1349, 9 a.m.,
421 E. Broadway, Stinnett.
Young adults Christian mar-
riage class, Word of Life
Church, 9:45 a.m.Sundays,
Wednesdays, Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcotics
Anonymous, Valley Drive
west entrance, Cedar Street,
7:30 p.m. Call 806-570-2028
or 857-4038 for more infor-
mation
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014 Borger News- Herald
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
LUXIVA
®
Gentle Polish
For all skin types.
Creamy facial scrub, gentle
enough for everyday use.
Smoothing microspheres
gently buff away dead skin
cells for a polished glow.
Evens skin surface for more
natural-looking makeup ap-
plication. Leaves skin looking
brighter and more luminous.
Recipe of the Day
When making a meal, be it an in-
timate dinner for two or the main
course for a dinner party, the entree
often gets the bulk of the attention.
But as any cook knows, the side
dishes can make just as big an im-
pression as the main course.
Few side dishes are as versatile
and beloved as mashed potatoes.
When making your next feast, con-
sider the following recipe for “Ir-
resistible Basil Mashed Potatoes”
from Marlena Spieler’s “Yummy
Potatoes” (Chronicle Books).
Irresistible Basil Mashed Potatoes
Serves 4 to 6
2 pounds floury, baking-type po-
tatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
Salt
2 to 3 cups fresh basil leaves of
any type (2 to 3 ounces -- a nice big
bunch)
2 cups heavy (whipping) cream
or half-and-half
4 tablespoons butter
Black pepper
1. Place the potatoes in a sauce-
pan and fill with water to cover.
Add a big pinch of salt. Bring to a
boil and cook, covered, for about
10 minutes, or until the potatoes are
just tender. Drain, return to the heat
and shake for a few minutes to dry
them out; turn off the heat, cover
the pan and keep warm.
2. Meanwhile, blanch the basil.
Plunge it into a saucepan of boil-
ing water, cook a moment or two
until the leaves wilt and slightly
change color and lift out of the pot
using a slotted spoon, then plunge
into a bowl of ice water. Leave for
about five minutes or until it turns
brightly colored, then lift from the
ice water.
3. Heat the cream in a saucepan
until bubbles form around the edge
of the pan.
4. Squeeze the basil in your hands
gently to rid it of excess water from
cooking. Place in a food processor
and whirl to puree. Slowly pour the
hot cream into this pureed basil and
whirl until it forms a fragrant, pale
green cream.
5. Coarsely mash the potatoes
with a masher, then add the basil
cream and mash it in; work in the
butter, and season to taste with salt
and pepper. If you’re serving duck
or lamb, serve the potatoes with a
drizzle of the port reduction around
the edge.
A tasty take on
a beloved side dish
3A
Do YOU have a recipe that you’d like to see
featured in our “Recipe of the Day” section?
Drop your submissions by the Borger News
Herald at 2nd and Main, or e-mail them to
Feature@borgernewsherald.com
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Are you interested in writing a column
for the newspaper? Let us know!
Send your ideas to
editor@borgernewsherald.com
and they could be considered for publication!
Note: The Borger News-Herald cannot offer
compensation to columnists at this time.
4A
Letters to the Editor
Opinion
The long desired as-
surance that Anne-Miriam
craved was answered by a
picture, a picture of Jesus,
Cleopas, and his companion
on the road to Emmaus. It
spoke so emphatically to her.
Even after she returned home
to Norway, the picture con-
tinued to remind her, whis-
pering the great faithfulness
of a loving Father. Though
she was unaware, this was
not the frst time a hungry
heart had been deeply moved
by this painting.
Previously, in another
retreat center years before,
this same familiar scene had
been the focal point in a talk
given by the spiritual direc-
tor. Troy Christian from
Farwell, Texas attended that
walk. The minister skillfully
presented his talk, weaving
it around the well-known
painting. Warmth enveloped
his waiting heart and Troy
felt that he personally was in
that picture. He was part of
the story. Completely capti-
vated he asked later, “Where
can I fnd a picture like that?”
He was directed to a Chris-
tian bookstore.
He and his wife, Lilly
were delighted when they
located a loose print. Lilly
framed it and hung it on the
wall in their home. For two
years, the painting continued
to speak to them. Joy swelled
in their hearts each time they
glanced at the painting.
But when the ARK was
newly remodeled their hearts
stirred within them. They felt
compelled to donate the pic-
ture to the ARK. This pow-
erful painting had comforted
them. Perhaps it would speak
peace to others as well. Lov-
ingly they hung the painting
over the mantle at the ARK.
It was the late nineties, just
in time for the frst Women’s
Walk to Emmaus.
Ted and I have just re-
turned from the ARK where
we worked a Men’s Walk to
Emmaus. Another picture
now hangs over the mantle.
But as I wandered through
one of the sitting areas I
spotted the beloved picture.
There beneath its watch-
ful gaze a group of weary
workers had crashed on the
sofas and chairs for a brief
respite I couldn’t help think-
ing, “These fatigued, faith-
ful brothers of all ages have
spread the table with good-
ies, iced drinks, emptied the
trash, made the beds, cleaned
the bathrooms as an expres-
sion of God’s love for these
pilgrims. Will they also re-
ceive comfort and assurance
from Holy Spirit through
this painting? Will they join
Cleopas and his companion
saying, “Didn’t our hearts
burn within us as He talked
to us on the road and opened
the scripture to us?”
My spirit is soothed to
know that years before Anne-
Miriam arrived in West Tex-
as, Father hung out a banner
of love that said, “Welcome
My daughter, I’ve been wait-
ing for you.” He was there
all the time.
He Was Tere All Te Time
Your Column Here!
Why you should subscribe to the Borger News Herald:
* New Doctor’s Column
* New layout
* New columnist - Randy Ray, Don Newbury,
Jaimee Coburn, Janice “Nana” Bambalere
* New Staff
* Smile of the Day
* More local content
207 N. Main, Borger, Texas
Telephone: (806) 273-5611
Fax: (806) 273-2552
www.borgernewsherald.com
Publisher: Stephanie Hooper
Editor: JC Cortez
Feature Reporter: Nathan Blankenship
Production Manager: Joe Jones
Subscription Rates:
$8.50 per month for home delivery
$17.50 per month by mail
Daily: 50¢
Sunday: 75¢
2012
Pat yourself on the back, JC Cortez, for a great Darwin
Day editorial. The Panhandle needs more people challeng-
ing the indoctrinated views of the region’s misinformed.
I left West Texas years ago and moved to a scientifc city
flled with inquiring minds and an unbridled passion for
discovery. Whenever I return to visit family I am greatly
saddened by the anti-science, anti-intellectual, anti-every-
thing-but-Jesus attitude I see everywhere. Thank goodness
our youth today are smarter than the generation they are
replacing. There is still hope for us yet.
John Cortesy
Los Alamos NM
Dear Sir,
From your article on the above...
“and the rest of the world laughs at us.”
Yes, we do. I understand Texans like to think they don’t
care what other people think but we (in Europe) think
creationists are ridiculous, at the same intellectual level
as the Islamist brutes who destroy great historical art. The
difference is that people in this town are living in the frst
world, with access to education, learning, libraries, internet,
Wikipedia even. To be so deliberately ignorant is inexcus-
able. If they approached the rest of their lives with the same
anti intellectual rigour, they would turn down most modern
medicine.
Well done on your article. I hope it works out for you.
Sincerely,
Cathal O Sullivan
Cork, Ireland
I just wanted to commend the editor for publishing the
article “The Importance of Teaching Reality” by JC Cortez.
It’s always refreshing as well as all too important to see
columns promoting education and rational thought.
Keep up the great work!
- Felipe Latorre
I would just like to say thanks to the writer of this article,
for having the courage to actually say what needs to be
said about this divisive subject. When our children are not
taught the facts about certain subjects, it sets them behind in
the academic world, which can have vast repercussions on
their future academic development. If America wants to be
the world leader in science, we have to make sure that our
future generations understand the reality of the world, and
to not be afraid to think critically. Thank you to this writer,
and thank you to your paper for running it.
- David Chancellor
I just wanted to write this email thanking you for pub-
lishing the piece “The Importance of Teaching Reality” by
JC Cortez. It’s important that we put our religious convic-
tions aside when it comes to science. The word from a book
is not evidence. Evolution is real and the annals of history
will put those who believe on the losing side of the debate.
Thanks again,
- Jack Starr
“The Importance of Teaching Reality”, wanted to say
thank you for the article. I enjoyed reading it.
- Mike T. Wishon, USAF
TODAY IN HISTORY
1605 – The frst edition
of El ingenioso hidalgo Don
Quijote de la Mancha (Book
One of Don Quixote) by
Miguel de Cervantes is pub-
lished in Madrid, Spain.
1707 – The Scottish Par-
liament ratifes the Act of
Union, paving the way for
the creation of Great Britain.
1909 – Ernest Shackle-
ton’s expedition fnds the
magnetic South Pole.
1919 – Temperance
movement: The United
States ratifes the Eighteenth
Amendment to the United
States Constitution, authoriz-
ing Prohibition in the United
States one year after ratifca-
tion.
1939 – The Irish Repub-
lican Army (IRA) begins a
bombing and sabotage cam-
paign in England.
1945 – Adolf Hitler
moves into his underground
bunker, the so-called Füh-
rerbunker.
1969 – Czech student Jan
Palach commits suicide by
self-immolation in Prague,
Czechoslovakia, in protest
against the Soviets’ crushing
of the Prague Spring the year
before.
1969 – Soviet spacecraft
Soyuz 4 and Soyuz 5 per-
form the frst-ever docking
of manned spacecraft in or-
bit, the frst-ever transfer of
crew from one space vehicle
to another, and the only time
such a transfer was accom-
plished with a space walk.
1986 – First meeting of
the Internet Engineering
Task Force.
2003 – The Space Shuttle
Columbia takes off for mis-
sion STS-107 which would
be its fnal one. Columbia
disintegrated 16 days later
on re-entry.
Jody Wilson
Jody’s Journal
Oh, what a wonderful
idea someone had when they
established Valentine’s Day.
In the dead of winter we need
to remind each other that we
love.
There are a couple of
downers. Like if one of a
couple forgets. I don’t know
how that could happen with
all the advertising every-
where. But there’s going to
be someone who’s going to
try to convince their honey
that they forgot. NOT a good
excuse.
I’ve also known peo-
ple who say it’s too “com-
mercial”. They also say
that about Christmas. One
doesn’t have to participate
in the commercialism. One
could make a card or write a
poem, cook a special dinner,
arrange to have a sleep over
for the kids, so you can have
a romantic night together.
These are all things
we’ve done on Valentine’s
Day, especially when we’ve
been short of funds. One
year, I couldn’t fnd anyone
to take the kids overnight,
and we desperately needed
some alone time. So I let
my young children skip their
afternoon nap and we played
outside until dinner time. I
gave them their favorite din-
ner. A nice, warm bath, a
song in the rocking chair and
{yahoo} both of them gone
to lala land.
I had set up our dining
room table in a small cor-
ner, decorated it with a red
checked tablecloth and a
candle on the table. I tried to
decorate around it like an Ital-
ian restaurant. I had made a
marinara sauce that had been
simmering most of the day. I
make a garlic bread that John
used to love, so I made that
and an Italian salad.
As he drove up, I put the
music on. Surprised? Oh,
yes. He spent the whole
meal telling me why he loved
me {sigh}. After the meal,
well, I’ll just leave that to
the imagination. We did get
some good alone time. My
kids were good sleepers.
This works well for an-
niversaries also and, men, if
you want to impress a wom-
an, cook for her. It doesn’t
have to be fancy, trust me,
my husband’s value few
through the roof the morning
he made me waffes in bed.
If you really don’t know
anything about cooking, get
a friend to teach you just
one dish. It’s okay to admit
to your lady that your just
learning to cook. Don’t try
to misrepresent yourself.
She’ll love you for your hon-
esty. Okay, I’ve given my
love lessons for the day.
A lot of people also seem
to want to know how we’ve
stayed married 43 years. I’ll
tell you the truth.
When John and I met,
neither one of us had anyone
in our lives to call a friend.
Both of us felt alone and iso-
lated. We became friends
immediately. We dated ev-
ery chance we had and when
we couldn’t be together he
called and we’d talk for
hours. It was on one of those
phone calls when he asked
me to marry him.
I said yes because I
couldn’t imagine my life
without him. He’d become
my best friend, and I was so
attracted to him also.
We are total opposites.
He’s outgoing and people
love him. I’m an introvert
and would just as soon do
all work in the background.
I don’t like being left out
but please don’t shove me
up in front of a large group.
John loves large groups and
older people and they love
him. It’s been like that since
I’ve known him. No matter
where we are, if there’s an
older person that needs help,
he’ll stop and help them. So,
back to the 43 years.
#1 Remember that the
things that are irritating you
now are things you fell in
love with. So when I’m feel-
ing way down and John drags
me out to a movie, I know
it’s going to make me feel
better to get out, even though
I didn’t want to go.
#2 There’s no such thing
as 50/50 anything in a mar-
riage. Don’t even try to keep
track. Just try to keep talk-
ing.
#3 Fight fair. We had to
take a class on this but it was
one of the best investments
we ever made in our mar-
riage. Sometimes you can
fnd the classes at a college
or you can also fnd it at your
church. Contact me if you
need help.
Last but not least #4 di-
vorce is a forbidden word.
We agreed in the beginning
that we were in it for the long
haul and whatever comes
up, we’d fnd a way through
it, and boy have we had a
ride. It’s made us trust each
other much more then I ever
thought possible.
- You can contact Janice
at nanasplace@hotmail.com
Janice Bambalere
Nana’s Place
Nana’s Place
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014
Borger News- Herald 6A
Community
Stay
Informed
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
The Borger Youth
Advisory Council will
“Light Up The Sky
Against Hunger” on Fri-
day, April 4, 2014, when
they play host to a glow
in the dark 5k fun run,
walk, or ride to benefit
the Snack Pak 4Kids
program in Borger. The
5k will be held in down-
town Borger. Sign ins
and late registration
will begin at 6:00 p.m.
in the City Hall park-
ing lot at 600 N. Main.
There will be a pre-run
party for participants to
get “glowing” before
the race begins. Borger
Police Department and
Borger Fire Department
will also be competing
in a “Boots vs. Badges”
pre-run competition to
get participants fired up
for the run.
The glow in the dark
5k will begin as soon as
it gets dark. The course,
for the run, starts at the
cross walk between
the Borger Chamber
of Commerce and the
Hutchinson County Mu-
seum. Participants will
then proceed north to
9th Street, turn left on
to 9th Street, turn left
on to Deahl Street, pro-
ceed down Deahl Street
to 4th Street, turn left on
to 4th Street, turn left on
to Main Street, and then
proceed back to the start-
ing line. The course is 3
laps. Participants will
also be able to stop along
the course at designated
check points to pick up
information about the
Snack Pak 4Kids pro-
gram, get a drink of wa-
ter, and pick up more
“glow”.
Participants can reg-
ister in several ways. To
register in person, par-
ticipants can go to Borg-
er Fitness Club at 430
N. Main, Johnson Park
Youth Center at 1201
Bulldog Blvd, City Hall
at 600 N. Main, Borger
Chamber of Commerce
at 613 N. Main, or at
Simply Pampered at 713
N. Deahl. Participants
can also register by mail
by downloading a reg-
istration form from the
City of Borger’s web site
at www.ci.borger.tx.us.
The cost to register is
$25 per participant. Par-
ticipants who register on
or before March 7, 2014
will receive a free event
t-shirt. If you have any
questions or need help
getting registered please
call 806-206-9367 or
806-886-4202.
The Borger Youth
Advisory Council is
very excited to be host-
ing this event. “This is
our way of giving back
to the youth in our com-
munity who depend
on this program,” says
Lizet Dour, BYAC Po-
lice Chief. “You never
know who you are walk-
ing beside in the halls at
school that may be going
hungry.” Currently, the
Borger Snack Pak 4Kids
program feeds 120 stu-
dents in the BISD school
district. The program
itself is funded through
community donations.
For more information
on the Snack Pak 4Kids
program, or how you can
help with the program,
contact Barbie Schroed-
er, Instructional Services
Coordinator for BISD, at
806-273-4345.
Glow In The Dark 5k
to beneft Snack Pak 4Kids
Mac Thornberry
Thornberry
U.S. Congress
Paid for by Thornberry for Congress Committee, P.O. Box 9392, Amarillo, TX 79105
“I work every day to defend the values
that have made America great --
for my family and for yours.”
Please Vote March 4th
A B I L E N E , T X
(02/13/2014)-- Payden
Dompe, a sophomore Bio-
chemistry major from Borg-
er, TX has been named to
the Fall 2013 Dean’s List at
McMurry University. To be
eligible for the Dean’s List,
a student must have main-
tained at least a 3.5 grade
point average while taking
12 or more credit hours.
Offering a diverse aca-
demic curriculum to more
than 1,400 students, Mc-
Murry University is a small
Christian liberal arts school
in Abilene. Students choose
from 41 majors; education
and business are popular as
are the school’s pre-profes-
sional programs in medi-
cine, dentistry, law, and
physical therapy. The three-
week May Term gives stu-
dents an opportunity to ex-
plore a subject outside their
major. Through the Servant
Leadership Program, stu-
dents learn about ethics and
develop leadership quali-
ties. Internships with busi-
nesses in Abilene present
undergraduates with the
opportunity to acquire ad-
ditional knowledge of the
workplace in nonproft and
corporate settings.
McMurry University
is committed to providing
opportunities and experi-
ences to ensure that every
McMurry student achieves
their maximum potential-in
their careers, their personal
relationships, and in their
roles as moral citizens and
contributing members of
society.
Payden Dompe Named to Dean’s
List at McMurry University
Amarillo, TX- Elaine
Hays, Republican can-
didate for U.S. House
of Representatives, will
spend several days this
week visiting the homes
of voters all across Tex-
as CD 13. Hays, family
members, volunteers and
staff will be campaigning
door-to-door in Amarillo,
Gainesville and Wichita
Falls.
“One of the most ef-
fective ways to truly lis-
ten to voters is by meeting
face-to-face. I’ve enjoyed
the conversations I’ve had
while going door-to-door,
and I am looking forward
to visiting with more peo-
ple this week,” said Hays.
“It’s a great reminder
of who I would be work-
ing for.”
Specific dates, times
and locations are provid-
ed. For additional ques-
tions or details, please
contact Taylor Hays: 806-
223-6278, schedule@
el ai nehaysforcongress.
com.
- Wednesday Amarillo,
TX 10:00 am – 12:00 pm,
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
- Friday Gainesville,
TX 12: 00 pm – 2:00pm,
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
- Saturday Wichita
Falls, TX 10:00 am –
12:00 pm, 1:00 pm – 4:00
pm
Elaine Hays is chal-
lenging 20-year-incum-
bent, Mac Thornberry, in
the Republican primary
on March 4, 2014.
Elaine Hays traverses the district
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014
Borger News- Herald 7A
Community
The Hutchinson County
United Way of Day of Car-
ing will held on April 26,
2014.
Day of Caring is a day
when volunteers choose to
give their time and servic-
es to work on a one-time
service project in an ef-
fort to impact our commu-
nity’s needs with tasks that
they are unable to perform
themselves. Projects are
dependent upon the man-
power available.
If you or someone you
know is elderly or disabled
and in need of help with
minor home improvement
projects, such as:
- Home Repairs
- Gutters Cleaned
- Winterizing Home For
Elderly or Disabled
- Small Painting Proj-
ect
- Yard Clean Up
- House Keeping
- Carpentry & Odd Jobs
All jobs will be limited
to four hours of work.
Jobs are limited, the fol-
lowing types of work will
not be approved:
- Work requiring per-
mits
- Bathroom remodeling
- Large Paint Jobs
- Roofng
- Gas lines
- Electrical
- Plumbing
- Tree Trimming
- Minor Fence Repair
Only
- Work on rental prop-
erty
If you would like to sub-
mit a project, please call
(806) 274-9424.before the
March 17, 2014 deadline.
Call early, only 30 job re-
quests are being taken.
Apply to be a 2014 United
Way Day of Caring recipient
Brandy Callahan, City of
Borger Council Member, in
recognition of her commit-
ment to continuing education,
was recently a recipient of
the Texas Municipal League
Institute (TMLI) designa-
tion of Certifed Municipal
Offcial. This designation
was presented at the TMLI
Awards Presentation at the
TML Elected Offcials’ Con-
ference on Sunday, Febru-
ary 9, 2014, in San Antonio.
This honor is presented to
those individuals who com-
pleted 72 or more continu-
ing education units during
the 2013 calendar year and
is the top honor in the TMLI
program. The 72 CEUs must
include two hours of open
government training. Only
37 Certifed Municipal Off-
cial designations were earned
statewide.
The TMLI program is de-
signed to enhance the lead-
ership and problem-solving
capabilities of Texas’ elected
city offcials. Participants
are offered educational ses-
sions on legal issues, budget-
ing, governance, personnel,
and more.
Elected offcials from
all over the state attended
the conference, which was
sponsored by both TML and
the Association of Mayors,
Councilmembers and Com-
missioners. TML is a volun-
tary association of more than
1,130 Texas cities. The City
of Borger is a member of the
Texas Municipal League.
Callahan honored at
Elected Offcials’ Conference
Borger City Council Member Place 1, Brandy Callahan, receives the Texas Municipal
League Institute (TMLI) designation of Certifed Municipal Offcial from Irene Mason,
Mayor Pro-Tem of Muleshoe and President of the Association of Mayors, Councilmem-
bers and Commissioners (AMCC)
A LOOK BACK I N HUTCHI NSON COUNTY HI STORY
i s sponsored by Provenance Consul ti ng
www. hut chi nsoncount ymuseum. org
618 North Main Street
Borger, Texas 79007
806-272-0130
Open Tue- Fri
9am-5pm
Sat-11am-4:30pm
Free admission
Handicapped
accessible
Kid-friendly
Mattie Castlebury was a business woman who may have followed Ace Borger from Oklahoma.
She owned Mattie's White Way Dance Hall and later, the Tokio Club on west Sixth Street.
Mattie was considered a respectable woman and her establishments were well-run, legal
businesses. Though, at the urging of the Texas Rangers in 1929, she left Borger and later
opened a club near Kilgore in the booming east Texas oil fields. This newspaper illustration
gives us a glimpse of how Mattie's place may have appeared during Boomtown days.
Mattie's White Way Dance Hall
A LOOK BACK I N HUTCHI NSON COUNTY HI STORY
WITH INPUT FROM LOCAL CITIZENS, KEL HAS WORKED HARD
TO DELIVER CONSERVATIVE AND RESPONSIBLE RESULTS
Fighting to repeal Obamacare and its tax
Proven leader to secure future water resources for West Texas (Prop 6)
Helped pass a balanced state budget with no tax increase
Restored $5.6 billion in state public education funding
Voted for a $1.4 billion business tax cut
Supported increased border security measures
Voted for stronger pro-life and pro-family reforms
Strengthened property owner and gun owner rights
Voted for mandatory drug testing for state unemployment benefts
267
www.KelSeliger.com
Campaign Hotline: 432-528-9427
Email: Lauren@kelseliger.com
Pol. Ad by Kel Seliger Campaign
Republican Primary: March 4, 2014
Early Voting: February 18 - 28
Staying true to his original campaign promise to hold at least one townhall
meeting annually in each of the 37 counties he serves in the Texas Senate,
Kel Seliger recently completed his 267th Town Hall Meeting.
Townhall Meetings & Counting!
Kel listens
and gets it done!
M & M Auto Parts, Inc.
330 N Weatherly - 806-273-3781
Friendly, Knowledgeable & Experienced Parts Professionals.
Auto Parts & Accessories • Truck Parts & Accessories
Tools and Tool Boxes • Paint and MORE!
Hours: M-F 7am -6pm & Saturday 8am-12pm
Business Spotlight
Borger Economic
Development Corporation
Amarillo, Texas, Feb-
ruary 10, 2014 -- In antic-
ipation of its main event
in 2015, YC3 announces
its first Mini Con from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m., February
22, at The Table’s Edge
Gaming and Comic Store,
4515 S. Georgia, in South
Georgia Shopping Center.
Admission is free. Do-
nations at the door will go
to Children’s Miracle Net-
work.
Special guests include:
· Inker for Marvel, DC,
Dark Horse and Image
Comics Sam de la Rosa
· Artist for Image Com-
ics Joe Eisma
· Inker for Third Em-
pire Studios Greg Harms
· Artist of Robot Friday
Thomas Clemmons
· Artist for Antarctic
Press Will Terrell
· Artists from Sequen-
tial Thursdays
· Tanner Willis and
Chris Anderson of The
Post-apocalypse Report
podcast
At this family friendly
event, guests will enjoy
comics, sketches, cosplay,
prizes and more. Guests
are encouraged to come in
their favorite costumes.
Additional YC3 Mini
Cons will be scheduled
throughout 2014.
Yellow City Comic Con to
host frst of several Mini Cons
P3425 $ 8,995
2007 Ford Escape
P3464 $16,995
2007 Ford Explorer
P3485 $27,995
2008 Ford F-150
P3701 $10,995
2005 Ford Freestyle
P3801 $21,995
2010 Ford Escape
P3572B $7,995
2007 Ford Focus
P3870 $13,995
2006 Cadillac CTS
P3858 $12,995
2008 Saturn Vue
P3921 $15,995
2007 Saturn Outlook
P4094 $34,995
2012 Dodge Ram
P3338 $12,995
2008 Dodge Durango
R4027 $17,995
2009 Dodge Charger
P4026 $16,995
2009 Dodge Journey
R4039 $ 8,995
2004 Dodge Ram
P3356 $27,995
2007 GMC Yukon XL
P3762 $19,995
2010 Kia Soul
R4064 $13,995
2006 Toyota 4runner
P3926 $15,995
2006 Toyota Avalon
P4032 $23,995
2008 Toyota Tundra
R3776 $18,995
2006 Toyota Tacoma
P3864 $22,995
2012 Chevrolet Impala
P2922A $8,995
2006 Chevrolet HHR
P3440 $6,995
2006 Chevrolet Malibu
R3620 $14,995
2004 Chevrolet Tahoe Z71
P3794 $9,850
2002 Chevrolet Tahoe
P3880 $17,995
2008 Chrysler 300
P3989 $ 8,995
2006 Chrysler Sebring Conv.
P3608A $10,995
2003 Jeep Grand Cher.
NO CREDIT
CHECK!
CELEBRATING 55
YEARS!!
ALL VEHICLES
CLEARLY PRICED!!!
VIEW ALL
VEHICLES AT
www.dougboydmotors.com
NO Gimmicks!
NO Games!!
NO Fine Print!!!
BUY HERE
PAY HERE
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
C A $ H F O R
CARS/TRUCKS:
G E T A Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer!
Running or Not.
Damaged? Wrecked?
OK! We Pay Up To
$20,000! Call
Toll Free: 1-800-
871-9712
USED CARS/TRUCKS
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
480 RV SALES
470 TRUCKS/TRAILERS
120 X 100 LOT i n Fri tch-
Vi nson Devel opment.
$2,000. Cal l (806)275-
0797
420 OTHER CITIES PROP.
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
i n thi s newspaper i s sub-
j ect to the federal fai r
housi ng act of 1968
whi ch makes i t i l l egal to
adverti se “any prefer-
ence, l i mi tati on or di s-
cri mi nati on based on
race, col or, rel i gi on,
handi cap, fami l y status,
sex or nati onal ori gi n, or
an i ntenti on to make any
such preference, l i mi ta-
tion or discrimination.”
Thi s newspaper wi l l not
knowingly accept any ad-
verti si ng for real estate
which is in violation of the
l aw. Our readers are
hereby i nformed that al l
dwel l i ngs adverti sed i n
thi s newspaper are avai l -
able on an equal opportu-
nity basis.
340 APART. RENTALS
203 ABILENE 3BDRM
1BATH C/H/A. No Pets.
$700/month +Deposi t.
(806)898-2058
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
1206 WISCONSIN 3/1 2
car garage New Updates
$750/month $750/Deposi t.
Outsi de pets onl y. 584-
9750,or,584-9238
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
BUYING JUNK CARS
wi th good ti tl es and scrap
iron (806)663-6907
290 MISC. WANTED
D I S H T V R E -
T A I L E R . S T A R T -
I N G $19.99/month
(for 12 mos.)
Broadband Inter-
net
starting
$14.95/month
(where availa-
ble.) Ask About
SAME DAY Instal-
lation!
CALL Now! 1-800-
593-2572
230 MISC. FOR SALE
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
i ng, anythi ng you want
done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
110 WORK WANTED
090 HELP WANTED
010 SPECIAL
PUBLIC NOTICE
001 Legals
005 Public Notice
009 RV Parks
010 Special
015 Auctions
020 Garage Sale
040 Personals
050 Lost & Found
070 Business Solutions
090 Help Wanted
110 Work Wanted
120 Child Care
130 Educational
140 Antiques
150 Home Furnishings
190 Livestock & Supplies
200 Pets & Supplies
230 Miscellaneous For
Sale
250 Boats & Supplies
280 Motorcycles &
Bicycles
290 Miscellaneous
Wanted
300 Want to Rent
310 Rooms For Rent
320 Houses For Rent
321 Houses For Lease
330 Mobile Home
Rentals
340 Apartment Rentals
380 Miscellaneous
Rentals
390 Business Opportunities
410 City Property For
Sale
420 Other Cities Property
470 Pickups, Trucks,
Trailers
480 Recreational
Vehicles
490 Automotive Sales
500 Mobile Home Sales
525 Appliance Repair
750 Firewood
800 Lawn Care
875 Telephone/TV
890 Tree Service
895 Used Cars/Trucks
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is hereby given that original Letters
Testamentary for the Estate of HARVEY
LEONARD DAVIS, Deceased, were issued
on the 6th day of February, 2014, in Cause
No. 8322, pending in the County Court of
Hutchinson County, Texas, to: DEANA
RENEE DAVIS.
All persons having claims against this Es-
tate which is currently being administered
are required to present them to the under-
signed within the time and in the manner
prescribed by law.
Estate of Harvey Leonard Davis
c/o: Ed Hinshaw, Attorney at Law
108 East Sixth
Borger, TX 79007
Nurses
Unlimited, Inc.
is seeking enthu-
siastic attendants
to assist clients
in the home with
personal care,
meal prep. and
light housekeep-
ing. PT E.O.E.
Call
1-888-859-0631
The Canadian River
Municipal Water Au-
thority (CRMWA)
is accepting applica-
tions for a Mainte-
nance Technician.
Performs general
maintenance duties
on aqueduct, Sanford
Dam and surrounding
areas – Must possess a
valid driver’s license,
CDL license pre-
ferred. High school
diploma or GED re-
quired. Applications
can be obtained at
CRMWA located at
9875 Water Author-
ity Road, Sanford or
at www.crmwa.com.
CRMWA is an EOE.
Experience Oilfield
Roustabout Wanted
Near Masterson.
Pay is $13/hr &
up depending
upon experience.
Water truck exp. a
plus! Perm. f/t w/
pd. benefits after
probationary period.
MUST HAVE TX DL!
CDL a Plus! Please
call (806)935-7563.
Amarillo
Protective
Services is
now taking
applications for
6ecur|ty 0fñcers
No experience
necessary and
must pass a
criminal history
background
check and drug
screen.
Please call
806-371-3400.
Need a
Part Time
Maintenance
person for a
new 48 unit
apt. complex.
Apply in person
at 400 E. 10th
St., Borger, Tx.
Large 1 bdrm apartment.
Stove, refrigerator,
AC & Some furniture.
Lighted off-street parking.
Nice quiet neighborhood.
$475, includes utilities.
(806) 273-3343
Help wanted
for temporary
positions ASAP!
Demolishing,
packing, crating.
Must be able to
lift and move
debris, crates, etc.
Fax application
immediately to
806-273-5441.
Email to
madisonjoy@
cableone.net or
apply in person at
700A Weatherly,
Borger, TX.
Full Time CDL-A-X Crude Oil
Transport Drivers Needed
Pampa, Perryton, Borger,
Wheeler, Canadian
Local Hauling-Home Daily, Weekly Paycheck
Paid Orientation/Training, Vacation,
401K, Life, Medical, Dental, Vision
Minimum of 12 months T/T or
Tanker experience required
Call Lori Hernandez 800/737-9981
or visit us online at www.MIPE.com
DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
2008 Ford F250
4-Door W/ALL TOOLS!!
Work Ready. 130,000
miles. $17,000 No
payments! Call Ricky
White at (580)754-1521
����� �� � ��
��������� � �� ����������
����� ���������� �� �������� �������
��������������������
���� ������ �������
��������� �������
��� �� ���� ��������� ������ ������
���� �� �������� ����
������ ��
�������� ��� ���� �� ���� ��
� �� �������� ������� ����������
��������
� ������ �������� ������ ����
���������� ������ �� ��� �����
������ �������� �������
� ������ ���������� ����� ��
������ �����
� ������ ������ ������ �����������
� ���� ������� ��������
� ������� ��������
� ����� �������
� ��� ���� ����
�������� �������� ��������� ����
� ������� ������ ���� � ������
���������� ���������� �
����������� ��������������
������������ ������� ����
����� ��� �������� ��������
Brierwood Apts.
For Rent
1, 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Castle Dr. Apts.
For Rent
3 bed / 1 bath
Fenced Yard
Call: 273-3982
2009 - 29 ft. Bumper
Pull Travel Trailer. 1
slide out. 4 Bunk beds in
back. Additional queen
bed in front, outside
stove & shower, lots of
storage. $14,500.
806-857-2857
Hampton Inn
Now Hiring
Morning &
Night Shifts
Must be
able to work
Weekends.
No phone
calls please.
Apply at
1415 W.
Wilson -
Borger
TAX SERVICE
Glenda
Brownlee
628 Whittenburg
274-2142
Weekend February 15-16, 2014
1B
Weekend Sports Highlights
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
This past Thursday, Febru-
ary 13, the West Texas Co-
manches (1-0) softball team
kicked off the season with a
bang.
Perryton (0-1) traveled to
West Texas High in hopes
of winning the game. Fortu-
nately, the Lady Comanches
had a different plan.
And it seems as though
the Comanche plan worked.
They sent Perryton home
with a loss by a score 10 - 9,
West Texas.
TONIGHT, Saturday, Feb.
15th, at NOON, the Coman-
ches has a non-conference
game against River Road.
This game will be at home
and the weather should be
gorgeous for it.
It is that time of year folks,
so get on out the the ball park
and cheer on your Coman-
ches!
We have just received the
the Borger Bulldogs will be
having their playoff game on
MONDAY, February 17th .
The game will be held
in Dimmitt, Tx. at the Dim-
mitt High School against the
Shallowater Mustangs. The
time for this game has been
set for 8:00 pm.
Remember this is a play-
off game and the Bulldogs
would love to see you there.
The ticket prices are $5.00
for adults and $3.00 for stu-
dents.
Those of you who have
never been to Wildcat Bluff
Nature Center are just miss-
ing out on all the beauty of
nature, as you can see in the
picture above.
The Nature Center has
developed a brand new
walking/hiking group. This
particular group is geared
more towards women age 60
and over. It has been named,
“Wise Women Walking.”
This is sure to get your
blood pumping as well as
strengthen those muscles.
Spring and fall are the best
times of the year to go hik-
ing. Smell the fresh air and
fowers.
The coordinators, Pat
Diggs and Ann Hicks, have
the frst event planned to take
place on Thursday morning,
February 20th at 10:00 am.
Everyone is to meet at the
Visitors Center shortly be-
fore 10:00.
The hike will last approx-
imately one hour as long as
the entire group wants to stay
out and keep going. Be sure
to wear your most comfort-
able and supportive shoes,
sunscreen, hats, and bring
water. There will be refresh-
ments available after the hike
at an organizational meeting.
Maybe, just maybe you
will see this beautiful cat.
This picture was taken just
four days ago in broad day-
light, down by the windmill.
If you have further ques-
tions about the group just e-
mail Ann at annhicks@sud-
denlink.net. Or e-mail Pat
at pad1448@sbcglobal.net.
You may also call 806-353-
4902 to reach Ann and 806-
676-3199 to reach Pat.
So make plans to go hik-
ing this spring and relax your
mind.
Friday Frank Phillips
College traveled to Enid, Ok
to take on Northern Oklaho-
ma College.
The FPC Lady Plainsmen
just couldn’t get iot together
for game 1. The game went 5
innings and ended with a loss
for Frank Phillips by a fnal
score of 0-8, NOC.
Back on the feld for game
two with NOC, the Lady Pla-
ismen had a bit more fre in
them. Although it still didn’t
get them the win, it did help
with the fnal score a bit bet-
ter of FPC 2 - NOC 4.
RBI’s by Trinidad Bar-
rera and L:esa Murphy.
This is just the beginning
of the season and these girls
will play hard to win the rest
of their games.
Hiking at Wildcat Bluf
Nature Center
West Texas Comanches of
to a good start
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
First games are lost by
Lady Plainsmen
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Bulldogs in playofs
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
KRASNAYA POLYANA,
Russia (AP) — Marit Bjo-
ergen has had to wait a full
week for another Olympic
medal, which is nearly an
eternity by her standards at
the games.
The wait should defnitely
end Saturday, and anything
but a gold in the women’s
4x5-kilometer relay for Nor-
way’s cross-country team
would be a major shock.
The four women on Nor-
way’s team — Bjoergen,
Therese Johaug, Heidi Weng
and Astrid Uhrenholdt Ja-
cobsen — occupy the top
four spots in the overall
World Cup standings, mak-
ing them one of the heaviest
favorites of the entire Sochi
Olympics.
If the frst three skiers can
avoid a serious fall or mis-
hap, Bjoergen should be able
to enjoy a similar anchor
leg to the one she skied at
the Vancouver Games. Back
then, Norway won by nearly
25 seconds despite Bjoergen
slowing down inside the sta-
dium to grab a Norwegian
fag and wave it as she went
down the fnal straight, be-
fore crossing the line with a
two-footed jump.
Since Vancouver, the Nor-
wegian women are unde-
feated in the 10 relays held at
the World Cup and in world
championships. Expect more
of the same on Saturday,
which would help put Bjo-
ergen back on the right track
again.
The Norwegian was the
most successful athlete at
the Vancouver Olympics
with three golds, one silver
and a bronze, and started
the Sochi Games with a vic-
tory in the 15-kilometer ski-
athlon. However, she then
failed to reach the fnal of
the freestyle sprint, and only
fnished a surprising ffth in
the 10K classical race on
Thursday. She said after that
race that she “collapsed” to-
ward the end. There should
be little chance of that in the
relay, even if the spring-like
warmth continues in Kras-
naya Polyana.
That leaves the other coun-
tries fghting for silver and
bronze, with Sweden, Fin-
land, Germany and Russia
the main contenders for the
consolation prizes.
Charlotte Kalla already
has two silver medals in
Sochi and will be anchoring
Sweden’s team, while Krista
Lahteenmaki is skiing the
last leg for Finland.
The American team
shouldn’t be counted out, ei-
ther. While sprint specialist
Kikkan Randall failed in her
quest for a medal in favored
sprint event, she and her
teammates have the ability to
keep up over the 5K distance
if everyone has a good day.
Anchor Jessica Diggins also
has a fearsome sprint, which
makes the team an outside
candidate for a medal.
The gold, though, should
be reserved for Norway.
Norway big favorite in women’s
cross-country relay
NEW ORLEANS (AP)
— With the frst pick in the
2014 NBA All-Star fantasy
draft ...
“I’d go with LeBron,”
Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan
said.
“I’ll take KD,” said
Cleveland’s Kyrie Irving.
That’s how close it is
right now between LeBron
James and Kevin Durant.
They are the very best
of the NBA’s best, both so
talented that even guys who
play against them every night
have trouble deciding which
one they think is better.
“I think it’s almost a situ-
ation where you have 1A and
1B, because both give you
so many different things out
on the court,” Minnesota’s
Kevin Love said.
“1A, 1B,” agreed Tony
Parker of the San Antonio
Spurs, who were knocked
out of the playoffs by Durant
two years ago and James last
year.
“As journalists you’re al-
ways going to try to choose,
but me as a basketball player
and playing against them,
they’re both great.”
James was the MVP of the
game in 2008, the last time
the NBA’s All-Star weekend
came to New Orleans. These
days, he’s the MVP of most
seasons, winning four of the
last fve awards. But King
James might be giving up the
throne this time, with mul-
tiple players believing Du-
rant will emerge with his frst
MVP award this season.
“I think it’s ultimately
going to be KD and LeBron,
and KD’s team is No. 1 in the
West right now,” Portland’s
Damian Lillard said. “He’s
getting 40 every night and
firting with a triple-double,
so I think if they had to pick
an MVP right now it would
be KD.”
But MVP is decided by a
media panel. Nobody voting
for that ever shares the foor
with James or Durant. What
about somebody like Car-
melo Anthony, who plays the
same position, is sandwiched
between them at No. 2 in the
scoring race, and has teamed
with both on the U.S. Olym-
pic team?
“As far as Durant, he’s a
hell of a scorer, great scorer,
gets better every year in all
facets of his game. Never
seen somebody his height
shoot the ball the way he’s
capable of shooting the ball,”
Anthony said.
“Then you look on the
fip side with LeBron, you
have somebody who’s so
powerful, so athletic, can do
so many things, can change
a game in so many differ-
ent ways throughout the
course of a game. So going
up against those two guys,
it’s a totally different mind-
set, game plan, focus that
you have to have because it’s
coming at you from a lot of
different ways.”
James has been consid-
ered the game’s best player
for a while now, having
moved past Kobe Bryant.
Durant was the sensational
scorer — he’s on his way to
a fourth scoring title in fve
years — but without the full
array of skills that James
possessed.
But even with his 26.5
points, 7.0 rebounds and
6.6 assists per game, James
isn’t the only guy flling up
every stat category. Besides
his 31.5 points per game,
Durant is also averaging 7.8
rebounds and 5.5 assists.
Love said James is like
“Old Faithful,” because “you
know what he’s going to give
you,” and added that “at this
point it’s going to be very
tough to pass him” as the
best player in the world.
But he seems in the Du-
rant category when it comes
to the MVP ballot.
“I have to say with what
Kevin Durant is doing at
this point, it’s pretty unbe-
lievable,” he said. “Scoring
the ball at such a high clip,
and then you look at the stat
sheet and he’s flling it up in
other categories as well. His
team is winning, and LeBron
is having a great year, but it
just seems like what KD has
done has been pretty unbe-
lievable.”
James caused a stir this
week when he said he be-
lieved he’d go down as one
of the top four players in his-
tory during an interview with
NBA TV that will air Mon-
day. Yet even as he looks to-
ward his place in the future,
he seems aware his status at
the present could be in jeop-
ardy.
“LeBron for a few years
has known Kevin Durant has
been coming as a player,”
said Dwyane Wade, James’
teammate in Miami.
“He wants to be the best,
one of the greatest of all-time
and he knows that this young
guy is coming and he’s try-
ing to protect his turf.”
Durant sent a loud state-
ment when the Thunder rout-
ed the Heat in Miami during
his incredible scoring run of
12 straight games with 30 or
more points. He scores so
easily that even other guys
who can fll it up are in awe,
and Irving said he’d pick Du-
rant at No. 1 in part because
of what Durant could do for
his own stats.
“It’s an easy assist,” Ir-
ving said. “Going up the
foor, he’s shooting from ev-
erywhere now. So you just
throw him the ball. He’s on
fre.”
But everyone already
knew Durant could score. It’s
the way he has added to his
game while leading Oklaho-
ma City to the league’s best
record even without the in-
jured Russell Westbrook that
has put him in the discussion
with James.
James has two straight
NBA titles, beating Durant in
the frst one, and that might
be the tiebreaker over the
ringless Durant. And it ap-
pears now a tiebreaker may
indeed be necessary.
“There’s not one you can
really just put over the other
right now at this moment. It’s
a tight race,” Atlanta’s Paul
Millsap said. “It all depends
on what you’re looking for,
to be honest with you.”
James, Durant arrive at All-Star
as NBA’s 1A, 1B
Borger News- Herald
Sports
2B
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014
HUTCHINSON COUNTY
PRECINCTS AND POLLING PLACES
ELECTION DAY
March 4, 2014
7:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Precinct 11 Faith Covenant Church 1501 S. Florida – Borger, TX
Precinct 14 Fairlanes Baptist Church 3000 Fairlanes Blvd. - Borger, TX
Precinct 21 Fritch School Adm. Bldg. 540 Eagle Blvd. - Fritch, TX
Precinct 23 St. Andrews Methodist Church 100 Amaryllis, Borger, TX
Precinct 31 WTHS Commons Room 600 Stewart Ave. - Stinnett, TX
Precinct 33 Frank Phillips College TRIO/ 1301 W. Roosevelt St., Borger, TX
College Advancement Bldg.
Precinct 41 Holt Community Bldg. 11911 Co. Rd. 22, Spearman, TX
Precinct 42 Borger School Adm. Bldg. 200 E. 9
th
St. – Borger, TX
………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
EARLY VOTING: February 18, 2014 through February 28, 2014
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Hutchinson County Courthouse 500 Main St., Basement, Stinnett, TX
Hutchinson County Annex 1400 Veta St., Room 111, Borger, TX
Fritch Library Community Room 205 N. Cornell, Fritch, TX
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
(AP) — Tucked in the corner
of the San Francisco Giants’
spring training clubhouse
are side-by-side lockers be-
longing to the four stars of
the starting rotation — Tim
Lincecum, Tim Hudson,
Matt Cain and Madison
Bumgarner.
At 38, Hudson is the new-
comer to the group, having
signed a two-year, $23 mil-
lion free-agent contract in
November.
He has pitched in the ma-
jor leagues for 15 seasons —
his frst six with the Oakland
Athletics and then nine with
the Atlanta Braves. He is
nine years older than Lince-
cum and Cain and 14 years
older than Bumgarner.
Yet the right-hander al-
ready seems to ft in nicely
with his new teammates.
With 205 career victories, he
is a welcome addition.
The only lingering ques-
tion is the status of his right
ankle, badly fractured on
July 24 while he was cover-
ing frst base against the New
York Mets and stepped on by
runner Eric Young Jr. The in-
jury ended Hudson’s season
with an 8-7 record.
After reporting with other
pitchers and catchers to the
Giants’ camp at Scottsdale
Stadium on Friday and tak-
ing his physical, Hudson said
he will be ready to make his
frst regular-season start on
time, either against the Ari-
zona Diamondbacks or the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
“Health-wise, I’m right
on schedule,” Hudson said.
“I will be ready for the start
of the season ... the ankle
feels really good, close to
100 percent, but we’re not
quite there yet.”
Hudson threw three bull-
pen sessions before coming
to camp and is due to throw
his frst offcial session for
the team on Sunday.
Giants manager Bruce
Bochy is looking forward to
seeing Hudson throw.
“I talked to him yester-
day, and right now, we are
planning to pitch him in that
frst game (regular season),”
Bochy said. “We are going to
monitor his time on the feld
(during the spring) and not
have him stand around on
that ankle too much.”
Hudson said he doesn’t
think about the ankle at all.
“The next few weeks
will give us a good gauge of
where it’s at,” he said.
When teams come to
San Francisco, Hudson said,
“They know they will be fac-
ing tough starting pitching.
It’s as good as it gets. I just
want to come in and contrib-
ute.”
Having his fellow starting
pitchers close by this spring
will be benefcial, he added.
“It’s important, because
we can work on our craft to-
gether,” he said.
Hudson wore a sweat
shirt with his college alma
mater, Auburn, on the front.
It was pointed out that his
catcher this season will be
Buster Posey, a Florida State
alum.
Florida State edged Au-
burn earlier this year for the
college football champion-
ship.
“Everybody has their
faults,” Hudson said, smil-
ing.
SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Teemu Selanne became the oldest hockey player to score in Olym-
pic history, helping Finland rout Norway 6-1.
“That record makes me feel very old,” Selanne said with a grin.
The 43-year-old wasn’t the only ageless wonder who helped his team win Friday.
Jaromir Jagr scored for the second time of the Sochi Games, on the eve of his 42nd birth-
day, to help the Czech Republic beat Latvia 4-2.
“I don’t get old, man,” Jagr said.
A relative young fella, 41-year-old Daniel Alfredsson of Sweden, skated past the com-
petition to get to the front of the net and poke in a game-winning goal with 7:21 left to beat
Switzerland.
The defending Olympic-champion Canadians cruised to a 6-0 win over Austria. They
don’t have any old players, just a bunch of good ones, including Jeff Carter, who scored three
straight goals in the second period of Canada’s second game of the tournament.
Finland (2-0) faces Canada (2-0) on Sunday for an automatic spot in the quarterfnals. The
loser might get the wild-card berth to move on to the fnal eight in the 12-nation tournament.
The Jagr-led Czechs (1-1) likely will have to play an extra game in the qualifcation round
just to reach the quarterfnals even if they beat Switzerland (1-1) on Saturday.
Sweden (2-0) moved into a favorable position to earn a spot in the quarterfnals as the only
undefeated team in Group C. With a victory over winless Latvia on Saturday, they Swedes
will earn a pass into the quarterfnals.
Over-40 hockey players
fourishing at Olympics
SOCHI, Russia (AP) —
After two days off, short
track resumes Saturday with
medals awarded in the wom-
en’s 1,500 meters and the
men’s 1,000.
Expect plenty of thrill-
ing pack skating, with the
sport’s traditional big four
countries of Canada, China,
South Korea and the United
States trying to pile up med-
als on day three of Olympic
competition.
Here are fve things to
watch for at Iceberg Skating
Palace:
WOMEN’S 1,500: Chi-
na’s Zhou Yang is the de-
fending champion, although
she was seventh at last year’s
world championships and is
ranked second in the world.
Her biggest challenger is
likely Park Seung-hi of South
Korea, the bronze medalist
in Vancouver four years ago.
Park is a two-time world
champion. Another South
Korean, Shim Suk-hee, could
be the second 17-year-old to
win a short track medal. Han
Tianyu of China took silver
in the men’s 1,500. If Zhou
falters, her teammates Li Ji-
anrou and Liu Quihong could
snag a spot on the podium.
TACTICS: The 1,500 in-
volves varying tactics. Some
skaters will try to win from
the front, keeping speeds up
while trying to wear out their
trailing rivals. Others will
conserve energy early and
stay back in the pack before
making their move late in the
13½-lap race.
MEN’S 1,000: Russia’s
Viktor Ahn tries to win a sec-
ond short track medal for his
adopted country. The former
South Korean citizen earned
a bronze — Russia’s frst in
the chaotic sport — in the
1,500. Charles Hamelin of
Canada, the 1,500 champion,
is back at the shorter dis-
tance.
TOUGH HEATS: The
four quarterfnal heats of the
men’s 1,000 feature tough
matchups. Eddy Alvarez
of Miami, Fla., will be up
against Ahn and Hamelin in
his heat. J.R. Celski of Fed-
eral Way, Wash., goes against
Sin Da-woon of South Korea
and Olivier Jean of Canada
in his heat. “I have prepared
well for this, and I’m ready,”
Celski said. Only the top two
skaters in each heat advance
to the semis later Saturday.
BOUNCING BACK:
Traditional short track pow-
er South Korea will try to
bounce back. Park Seung-hi
earned a bronze in the 500 af-
ter she fell and got up when a
crash downed two other skat-
ers in the fnal. The men’s
team was eliminated in the
5,000 relay semifnals after
a crash involving Lee Ho-
suk and Alvarez. After sev-
eral anxious moments, the
referees advanced the U.S.
and penalized the Koreans. In
the men’s 1,000, the Koreans
have just two skaters in Lee
Han-bin and Sin. The Korean
women have three qualifers
in the women’s 1,500: Shim
Suk-hee, Cho Ha-ri and Kim
Alang.
2 Olympic short track medals
to be awarded
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Bae Sang-moon is off to an-
other great start at the North-
ern Trust Open. The next step
is a better fnish.
Bae played bogey-free
Friday on another gorgeous
day at Riviera for a 5-under
66, giving him a one-shot
lead over Aaron Baddeley
and Robert Garrigus going
into the weekend.
Baddeley, who hasn’t won
since Riviera three years ago,
birdied his last four holes for
a 65. Garrigus played in the
afternoon, when it’s a little
more diffcult to make putts,
and managed just fne with a
67.
Bae was at 9-under 133.
The 27-year-old South
Korean was tied for the lead
going into the weekend at
Riviera last year. Bae strug-
gled to a 76 in the third round
and never got back into con-
tention.
“It was really, really good
experience, and I learned a
lot,” Bae said. “I improved a
lot from last year.”
He wound up winning the
Byron Nelson Championship
a few months later for his
frst PGA Tour victory.
Patience surely will be re-
quired at some point over the
weekend on what has shaped
up as one of the best weeks
of weather at Riviera — an
abundance of sunshine and
only a trace of wind. Despite
what would appear to be
pristine scoring conditions,
no one has reached double
digits under par this week, a
testament to one of the best
golf courses on the PGA
Tour.
“It’s a strong course, es-
pecially when it’s dry and
frm like it is,” Baddeley
said. “If you miss it out of
position, it’s really hard to get
the ball up-and-down. Today
was good, because I made a
couple good saves but com-
ing in, I had some good looks
and made them.”
And while Bae is in the
lead, the tournament remains
wide open, with 22 players
separated by only fve shots.
One of them is Dustin
Johnson, who led after the
frst round and opened with
two quick birdies. Johnson
never made any more prog-
ress, however. He dropped
shots on the 12th and 15th
holes to negate a few more
birdies, and missed several
good looks inside 12 feet. He
had to settle for a 70 and was
three behind at 6-under 136.
“I played pretty solid
today, just hit a couple of
bad drivers on the back.
But that’s going to happen,”
Johnson said. “But I still had
a lot of really good looks at
birdie and just couldn’t capi-
talize on any of them.”
Also three shots out of
the lead was Jim Furyk, who
had a 68.
Among those missing
the cut was Matt Kuchar,
who failed to qualify for the
weekend for the frst time
since the 2012 PGA Cham-
pionship. His streak of 30
straight cuts was the longest
active on tour, though still
behind the record 142 by Ti-
ger Woods.
Baddeley was in the mid-
dle of the pack until he hit his
approach on the 15th hole to
about 8 feet. He followed
with a short birdie putt on the
par-3 16th, rolled in a birdie
putt from 15 feet on the par-5
17th and fnished it off with a
25-foot birdie on the 18th.
Garrigus has made the cut
only once in four previous
trips to the Northern Trust
Open. He decided to bring a
new attitude, and it seems to
be working.
“I have pretty good will-
power, so as soon as I stepped
on the frst hole this week,
I’m like, ‘I absolutely love
this place.’ ... And I’m really
starting to like it,” Garrigus
said.
He also fgured it would
be one last chance to get
into the Match Play Cham-
pionship next week, though
someone will have to break
the news to him that the
Match Play feld is closed.
Garrigus won’t be playing
even if he wins.
Jordan Spieth managed
to get in the mix, especially
after he was on the cusp of
leaving early. The 20-year-
old Texan had tough par
putts on four straight holes at
the start of his round. When
he fnally missed one on the
fourth hole for his frst bo-
gey, he took off. Spieth bird-
ied four of his last fve holes
for a 66, leaving him in the
large group that was at 4-un-
der 138 along with Keegan
Bradley and Jimmy Walker,
still in the hunt for his fourth
win this season.
“I putted great today, a
lot of par saves on the front,”
Spieth said. “I could have
been 4 or 5 over at the turn,
and instead I was at even, so
very happy with the fnish.
Back in contention.”
Not so fortunate was Fred
Couples, who had a tiny cut
on the tip of his left thumb
that opened up to the size of
a dime, making it diffcult for
him to hang onto the club.
Couples has gone his entire
Hall of Fame career without
wearing a glove.
Asked if it bothered him,
he said, “Yeah. I couldn’t hit
the ball.” Couples made his
32nd appearance in this tour-
nament, but at 2-over 144
was certain to miss the cut.
Bae gets another crack at Riviera
Giants RHP Hudson says
he’ll be ready by opener
3B
WEEKEND,
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Business
Gary Schneck, Scott Mills, Beverly Creacy, and Brock Sherwood
BORGER EDWARD JONES FINANCIAL ADVISORS
Use “Tax Diversifcation” to help plan retirement income
Stephen Horst Diana Jack
Are you ready to retire?
You need to save and
invest as much as pos-
sible to pay for the re-
tirement lifestyle you’ve
envisioned. But your
retirement income also
depends, to a certain de-
gree, on how your retire-
ment funds are taxed.
And that’s why you may
be interested in tax diver-
sifcation.
To understand the con-
cept of tax diversifcation,
you’ll need to be familiar
with how two of the most
important retirement-
savings vehicles — an
IRA and a 401(k) — are
taxed. Essentially, these
accounts can be classifed
as either “traditional” or
“Roth.”
When you invest in a
traditional IRA or 401(k),
your contributions may be
tax-deductible and your
earnings can grow tax de-
ferred. With a Roth IRA
or 401(k), your contribu-
tions are not deductible,
but your distributions can
potentially be tax-free,
provided you meet cer-
tain conditions. (Keep in
mind, though, that to con-
tribute to a Roth IRA, you
can’t exceed designated
income limits. Also, not
all employers offer the
Roth option for 401(k)
plans.)
Of course, “tax free”
sounds better than “tax
deferred,” so you might
think that a Roth option is
always going to be prefer-
able. But that’s not neces-
sarily the case. If you think
your tax bracket will be
lower in retirement than
when you were working, a
traditional IRA or 401(k)
might be a better choice,
due to the cumulative tax
deductions you took at
a higher tax rate. But if
your tax bracket will be
the same, or higher, dur-
ing retirement, then the
value of tax-free distribu-
tions from a Roth IRA or
401(k) may outweigh the
benefts of the tax deduc-
tions you’d get from a tra-
ditional IRA or 401(k).
So making the choice
between “traditional” and
“Roth” could be tricky.
But here’s the good news:
You don’t necessarily
have to choose, at least
not with your IRA. That’s
because you may be able
to contribute to both a tra-
ditional IRA and a Roth
IRA, assuming you meet
the Roth’s income guide-
lines. This allows you to
beneft from both the tax
deductions of the tradi-
tional IRA and the poten-
tial tax-free distributions
of the Roth IRA.
And once you retire,
this “tax diversifcation”
can be especially valu-
able. Why? Because when
you have money in differ-
ent types of accounts, you
gain fexibility in how you
structure your withdraw-
als — and this fexibility
can help you potentially
increase the amount of
your after-tax disposable
income. If you have a
variety of accounts, with
different tax treatments,
you could decide to frst
make your required with-
drawals (from a tradi-
tional IRA and 401(k) or
other employer-sponsored
plan), followed, in order,
by withdrawals from your
taxable investment ac-
counts, your tax-deferred
accounts and, fnally,
your tax-free accounts.
Keep in mind, though,
that you may need to vary
your actual sequence of
withdrawals from year
to year, depending on
your tax situation. For
example, it might make
sense to change the order
of withdrawals, or take
withdrawals from mul-
tiple accounts, to help
reduce taxes and avoid
moving into a different
tax bracket.
Clearly, tax diversifca-
tion can be benefcial. So
after consulting with your
tax and fnancial advisors,
consider ways of allocat-
ing your retirement plan
contributions to provide
the fexibility you need
to maximize your income
during your retirement
years.
Edward Jones, its em-
ployees and fnancial
advisors cannot provide
tax or legal advice. You
should consult your attor-
ney or qualifed tax advi-
sor regarding your situa-
tion.
Here are some ques-
tions to ask yourself when
deciding whether or not
you are ready to retire.
Is your nest egg ad-
equate?
Remember that the ear-
lier you retire, the less time
you’ll have to save and the
more years you’ll be living
off of your retirement sav-
ings. The average Ameri-
can can expect to live past
age 78. (Source: CDC,
“Deaths: Preliminary Data
for 2011”) With future
medical breakthroughs
likely, it’s not unreason-
able to assume that life
expectancy will continue
to increase. Is your nest
egg large enough to fund
20 or more years of retire-
ment?
When will you begin
receiving Social Security
benefts?
You can begin receiving
Social Security retirement
benefts as early as age
62. However, your beneft
may be 25% to 30% less
than if you waited until
full retirement age (66 to
67, depending on the year
you were born).
How will retirement
affect your IRAs and em-
ployer retirement plans?
The longer you delay
retirement, the longer you
can build up tax-deferred
funds in your IRAs--
remember that you need
compensation to contrib-
ute to an IRA. You’ll also
have a longer period of
time to contribute to em-
ployer sponsored plans
like 401(k)s--and to re-
ceive any employer match
or other contributions. (If
you retire early, you may
forfeit any employer con-
tributions in which you’re
not yet fully vested.)
Will you need health
insurance?
Keep in mind that Medi-
care generally doesn’t
start until you’re 65. Does
your employer provide
post-retirement medical
benefts? Are you eligible
for the coverage if you re-
tire early? If not, you may
have to look into COBRA
or a private individual
policy--which could be an
expensive proposition.
Is phasing into retire-
ment right for you?
Don’t forget; retire-
ment need not be an all-
or-nothing affair. If you’re
not quite ready, fnancially
or psychologically, for
full retirement, consider
downshifting from full-
time to part-time employ-
ment. This will allow you
to retain a source of in-
come and remain active
and productive.
###
This information is pro-
vided for informational pur-
poses only. The information
is intended to be generic in
nature and should not be ap-
plied or relied upon in any
particular situation without
the advice of your tax, legal
and/or your fnancial advi-
sor. Neither Ameriprise Fi-
nancial nor its advisors or
representatives provide tax
or legal advice. The views
expressed may not be suit-
able for every situation.
Ameriprise Financial Ser-
vices, Inc. Member FINRA
and SIPC.
Pampa
(806) 665-9700
Visit us online at www.AccoladeHomeCare.com.
Serving over 220 counties in Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico.
A diagnosis of heart failure can
be overwhelming. Accolade’s
proven Cardiac program offers
very effective ways to treat heart
disease to improve your quality
of life and keep you from being
hospitalized. Accolade also
has a telemonitoring program
that enables our nurses to be
connected with you daily even
when they are not there in your
home. With Accolade you are
not alone.
Speaking
from the heart
“Accolade can help you learn how
to carefully manage heart failure
at home. If you are uncertain
about your heart health, come
talk to one of our nurses at our
simple Cardiac screening.”
Accolade Nurse, Cari Bigham, RN
Accolade Home Care
Cardiac Screenings
Pampa Senior Citizens
500 W. Francis, Pampa, TX
2/14/14
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Borger Opportunities Center
930 Illinois St., Borger, TX
2/19/14
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Mesa View ALF
1 Teas Circle, Canadian, TX
2/21/4
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Open to the Community
Pantex Federal Credit Union
Annual membership meeting.
Thursday February 27, 2014
7:00 p.m. at the Borger
Community Activity Center on the
campus of Frank Phillips College
1300 W. Wilson Borger 273-5692
411 E. Broadway Fritch 857-2400
807 N. Sumner Pampa 665-4212
Federally insured by NCUA
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
4B
WEEKEND
FEBRUARY 15-16, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Community Menus
Borger ISD
Page 1 FEBRUARY 2014
HIGH SCHOOL 9th - 12th
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Jan 22, 2014
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
4
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
5
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
6
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RED GRAPES
MILK VARIETY
7
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
10
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
11
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
12
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
13
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
14
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
17
HOLIDAY
18
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
19
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
20
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RED GRAPES
MILK VARIETY
21
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
24
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
25
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
26
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
27
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
28
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
Check your student's meal account, monitor their purchases & make payments online at www.myschoolbucks.com.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for
and does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 FEBRUARY 2014
HIGH SCHOOL 9th - 12th
Jan 22, 2014
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3
CHICKEN FAJITAS
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
RANCH STYLE BEANS
SEASONED CORN
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
4
CHICKEN FRIED STEAK
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLLS
STRAWBERRY CUP
APPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
5
BEEF CHALUPAS
OR
CHICKEN QUESADILLA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
6
CHICKEN SPAGHETTI
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
BREAD STICKS
CHILLED PEARS
GRAPE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
7
FISH TACOS
OR
HAMBURGER
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CREAMY COLESLAW
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
10
CORN DOG
OR
PIZZA DIPPERS
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
BAKED BEANS
VEGGIE CUP
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
MILK VARIETY
11
NACHOS GRANDE
OR
PBJ,UNCRUSTABLE
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
APPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
RAINBOW SHERBET
12
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWIC
OR
BURRITO
OVEN FRIES
TOMATO & CUCMBER CUP
FRUITY JELLO
MILK VARIETY
13
BEEFY MACARONI
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE JUICE
BREAD STICKS
MILK VARIETY
14
PIZZA VARIETY
OR
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
SPANISH RICE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
STEAMED BROCCOLI
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
17
NO SCHOOL TODAY
18
HAMBURGER
OR
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWIC
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
APPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
19
TANGERINE CHICKEN
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALA
BROWN RICE
MILK VARIETY
20
TACO PIE
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
OR
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
SUNCHIPS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
21
CHICKEN PARMESAN
BREAD STICK
OR
CHEESE PIZZA
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
24
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
POTATO CHIPS
OR
BURRITO
STEAMED BROCCOLI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
25
CRISPY TACOS
SPANISH RICE
OR
SOUTHWEST CHICKEN CAS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CINNAMON APPLESAUCE
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
26
CHICKEN NUGGETS
OR
SALISBURY STEAK
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
BROWNIE COOKIE
MILK VARIETY
Brown Gravy
27
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
OR
BREADED PORK CHOP
BREAD STICKS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
CHILLED PEACHES
ORANGE JUICE
MILK VARIETY
CHOCOLATE PUDDING
28
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
OR
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
CHILLED PEARS
CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE
MILK VARIETY
Check your student's meal account, monitor their purchases & make payments online at www.myschoolbucks.com.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for
and does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 FEBRUARY 2014
BIS/BMS LUNCH (5TH-8TH)
Jan 22, 2014
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3
CHICKEN FAJITAS
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
RANCH STYLE BEANS
SEASONED CORN
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
4
CHICKEN FRIED STEAK
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLLS
STRAWBERRIES
MILK VARIETY
5
BEEF CHALUPAS
OR
CHICKEN QUESADILLA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
6
CHICKEN SPAGHETTI
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
CHILLED PEARS
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
7
FISH TACOS
OR
HAMBURGER
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CREAMY COLESLAW
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
10
CORN DOG
OR
PIZZA DIPPERS
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
BAKED BEANS
VEGGIE CUP
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
MILK VARIETY
11
NACHOS GRANDE
OR
PBJ,UNCRUSTABLE
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
12
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWIC
OR
BURRITO
OVEN FRIES
TOMATO & CUCMBER CUP
FRUITY JELLO
MILK VARIETY
13
BEEFY MACARONI
OR
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
14
PIZZA VARIETY
OR
ULTIMATE TOSTADO
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
STEAMED BROCCOLI
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
17
NO SCHOOL TODAY
18
HAMBURGER
OR
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWIC
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
19
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BROWN RICE
OR
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALA
MILK VARIETY
20
TACO PIE
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
OR
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
SUNCHIPS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
21
CHICKEN PARMESAN
BREAD STICK
OR
CHEESE PIZZA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
24
HAM & CHEESE SANDWICH
OR
BURRITO
STEAMED BROCCOLI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
25
CRISPY TACOS
OR
SOUTHWEST CHICKEN CAS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CINNAMON APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
26
CHICKEN NUGGETS
OR
SALISBURY STEAK
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
Brown Gravy
27
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
OR
BREADED PORK CHOP
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
CHILLED PEACHES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
28
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
OR
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
Check your student's meal account, monitor their purchases & make payments online at www.myschoolbucks.com.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for
and does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 ELEMENTARY LUNCH 1st - 4th
FEBRUARY 2014
Jan 22, 2014
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3
CHICKEN FAJITAS
RANCH STYLE BEANS
SEASONED CORN
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
4
CHICKEN FRIED STEAK
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLLS
STRAWBERRY CUP
MILK VARIETY
5
BEEF CHALUPAS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
6
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
CHILLED PEARS
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
7
BAJA FISH STICKS
TEXAS TOAST
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CREAMY COLESLAW
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
10
CORN DOG
BAKED BEANS
VEGGIE CUP
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
MILK VARIETY
11
NACHOS GRANDE
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
12
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWIC
OVEN FRIES
TOMATO & CUCMBER CUP
FRUITY JELLO
MILK VARIETY
13
BEEFY MACARONI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
14
PIZZA VARIETY
STEAMED BROCCOLI
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
17
NO SCHOOL TODAY
18
HAMBURGER
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
19
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BROWN RICE
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALA
MILK VARIETY
20
TACO PIE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
CINNAMON APPLES
SPANISH RICE
MILK VARIETY
21
CHEESE PIZZA
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
24
BURRITO
STEAMED BROCCOLI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
25
CRISPY TACOS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
RANCH STYLE BEANS
ROSIE APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
26
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
27
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
CHILLED PEACHES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
28
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
Check your student's meal account, monitor their purchases & make payments online at www.myschoolbucks.com.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for
and does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 FEBRUARY 2014
PAUL BELTON PRE-K - KINDERGARTEN
Jan 22, 2014
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3
TURKEY & CHEESE WRAP
RANCH STYLE BEANS
SEASONED CORN
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
4
CHICKEN FRIED STEAK
WHIPPED POTATOES
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
HOT ROLLS
STRAWBERRY CUP
MILK VARIETY
5
BEEF CHALUPAS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
6
CHICKEN NUGGETS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
CHILLED PEARS
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
7
BAJA FISH STICKS
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CREAMY COLESLAW
CHILLED PEACHES
TEXAS TOAST
MILK VARIETY
10
CORN DOG
VEGGIE CUP
APPLE-PINEAPPLE D'LITE
BAKED BEANS
MILK VARIETY
11
NACHOS GRANDE
REFRIED BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
12
CHICKEN PATTY SANDWIC
OVEN FRIES
TOMATO & CUCMBER CUP
FRUITY JELLO
MILK VARIETY
13
BEEFY MACARONI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
RED GRAPES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
14
PIZZA VARIETY
STEAMED BROCCOLI
SEASONED CORN
APPLE & ORANGE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
17
NO SCHOOL TODAY
18
TANGERINE CHICKEN
BABY CARROTS
STEAMED BROCCOLI
PINEAPPLE ORANGE SALA
BROWN RICE
MILK VARIETY
19
HAMBURGER
OVEN FRIES
RANCH STYLE BEANS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
20
TACO PIE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SPANISH RICE
REFRIED BEANS
CINNAMON APPLES
MILK VARIETY
21
CHEESE PIZZA
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
24
BURRITO
STEAMED BROCCOLI
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
25
CRISPY TACOS
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
ROSIE APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
26
CHICKEN NUGGETS
WHIPPED POTATOES
CARROT COINS
Strawberries & Bananas
HOT ROLLS
MILK VARIETY
27
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
SEASONED GREEN BEANS
CHILLED PEACHES
BREAD STICK
MILK VARIETY
28
HOT DOG
SWEET POTATO FRIES
CUCUMBER DIPPERS
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
Check your student's meal account, monitor their purchases & make payments online at www.myschoolbucks.com.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for
and does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD Breakfast Menu
Borger High School Lunch Menu
Borger Middle School Lunch Menu
Borger Elementary School Lunch Menu
Paul Belton Lunch Menu
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
Borger ISD
Page 1 BIS/BMS BREAKFAST (5th - 8th)
DECEMBER 2013
CEREAL VARIETY & TEXAS TOAST OFFERED DAILY
Nov 18, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2
FRENCH TOAST STICKS
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
3
SCRAMBLED EGGS
W/BISCUIT & GRAVY
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
4
BREAKFAST CLUB
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
5
CHICKEN-n-WAFFLES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MILK VARIETY
6
BREAKFAST BURRITO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
BANANA
MILK VARIETY
9
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
PINEAPPLE TIDBITS
MILK VARIETY
10
CHEDDAR OMELET WRAP
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEACHES
MILK VARIETY
11
BREAKFAST PIZZA
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLE SMILES
MILK VARIETY
12
WAFFLES & SAUSAGE
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
13
CINNAMON ROLL W/BACON
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APRICOTS
MILK VARIETY
16
BRN SGR OATMEAL
W/BLUEBERRY LOAF
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
17
CHICKEN -n-BISCUIT
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
APPLESAUCE
MILK VARIETY
18
PANCAKE ON A STICK
W/ROASTED POTATOES
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY
ORANGE QUARTERS
MILK VARIETY
19
SUNRISE SANDWICH
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
RAISINS
MILK VARIETY
20
BREAKFAST TACO
FRUIT JUICE VARIETY or
CHILLED PEARS
MILK VARIETY
"In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice).
Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal
opportunity provider and employer.
*N/A* - denotes a nutrient that is either missing or incomplete for an individual ingredient.
* - denotes combined nutrient totals with either missing or incomplete nutrient data.
NOTICE: The data contained within this report and the NUTRIKIDS® Menu Planning and Nutritional Analysis software should not be used for and
does not provide menu planning for a child with a medical condition or food allergy. Ingredients and menu items are subject to change or
substitution without notice. Please consult a medical professional for assistance in planning for or treating medical conditions.
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
FEB. 3 FEB. 4 FEB. 5 FEB. 6 FEB. 7
PIZZA DIPPERS/ w
SPAG. SAUCE
GARDEN SALAD
BABY CARROTS
APPLE SLICES
BREADSTICK
VARIETY MILK
TACO SALAD w/
tortilla bowl
SALAD
CORN
FRESH FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
STEAK FINGERS
MASH POTATO/GRAVY
GREEN BEANS
APPLE/PINEAPPLE
D'LITE
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN QUESADILLA
PINTO BEANS
BABY CARROTS
ORANGE SLICES
SALSA
VARIETY MILK
CHEESEBURGER
hamburger set up
VEGGIE CUP
SLICED PEACHES
VARIETY MILK
FEB. 10 FEB. 11 FEB. 12 FEB. 13 FEB. 14
CHEESE ENCHILADA w
cheese garnish
REFRIED BEANS
GARDEN SALAD
SALSA
CINN. APPLES
VARIETY MILK
HOT DOG
POTATO ROUNDS
FRESH VEGGIE CUP
FRESH FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
GRILL CHEESE
SANDWICH
VEGETABLE SOUP
BABY CARROTS
FRUIT CUP
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN NUGGETS
MAC/CHEESE
SALAD
GREEN BEANS
APPLE SLICES
CRISPY CEREAL TREAT
VARIETY MILK
BURRITO
CORN
BABY CARROTS
MIXED FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
FEB. 17 FEB. 18 FEB. 19 FEB. 20 FEB. 21
NO
SCHOOL
BEEF/CHEESE CHALUPA
GARDEN SALAD
REFRIED BEANS
SALSA
APPLESAUCE
VARIETY MILK
COUNTRY FRIED STEAK
MASH POTATO/GRAVY
GREEN BEANS
ROLL
STRAWBERRY CUP
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN FAJITAS/
pepper/onion garnish
PINTO BEANS
CORN
ORANGES SLICES
SALSA
VARIETY MILK
FISH
HUSH PUPPIE
SWEET POTATO FRIES
COLESLAW
SLICED PEACHES
VARIETY MILK
FEB. 24 FEB. 25 FEB. 26 FEB. 27 FEB.. 28
CORN DOG
BAKED BEANS
TOMATO/CUCUMBER
CUP
APPLE/PINEAPPLE
D'LITE
VARIETY MILK
NACHOS
REFRIED BEANS
GARDEN SALAD w/
ranch dressing
ORANGE SLICES
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN SANDWICH
OVEN FRIES
FRESH VEGGIE CUP w/
ranch dressing
FRUITY GELATIN
VARIETY MILK
BEFFY MACARONI
GARDEN SALAD w/
ranch dressing
BABY CARROTS
FRESH GRAPES
BREADSTICK
VARIETY MILK
PIZZA
BROCCOLI SALAD
CORN ON COB
FRUIT BOWL
VARIETY MILK
SANDWICH BAR: Grades 3rd - 12th (everyday choice)
3rd - 12 th Grade: TURKEY, HAM SANDWICH
BAKED POTATO
SALAD/SALAD DRESSING
FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
FEBRUARY LUNCH MENU K - 8
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
FEB. 3 FEB. 4 FEB. 5 FEB. 6 FEB. 7
CINNAMON ROLL w
BACON
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
SAUSAGE KOLACHE
OR
CINNAMON POP TART
HASH BROWNS
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST PIZZA
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY MILK
WAFFLES/ w SAUSAGE
OR
ANIMAL CRACKERS w
STRING CHEESE
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
CHEESE OMELET
OR
VARIETY CEREAL W/
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
FEB. 10 FEB. 11 FEB. 12 FEB. 13 FEB. 14
OATMEAL w
BLUEBERY MUFFIN
OR
OATMEAL ROUND w
YOGURT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN BISCUIT
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
PANCAKE ON
STICK/SYRUP
OR
POP TART
HASH BROWNS
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
ANIMAL CRACKERS w
STRING CHEESE
OR
ENGLISH MUFFIN w
egg/cheese/ham
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST TACO
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
FEB. 17 FEB. 18 FEB. 19 FEB. 20 FEB. 21
NO
SCHOOL
SCRAMBLED EGGS w
BISCUITS & GRAVY
OR
ANIMAL CRACKERS w
STRING CHEESE
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST CLUB
OR
POP TART
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
CHICKEN n WAFFLES
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w
TEXAS TOAST
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST BURRITO
OR
OATMEAL ROUND w
YOGURT
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
FEB. 24 FEB. 25 FEB. 26 FEB. 27 FEB. 28
PANCAKES w/BACON
OR
POP TART
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
ENGLISH MUFFIN w/
egg/cheese/ham
OR
ANIMAL CRACKERS w/
STRING CHEESE
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
OATMEAL w/
cinnamon toast
OR
VARIETY CEREAL w/
texas toast
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
SCRAMBLED EGGS w/
BISCUITS AND GRAVY
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
BREAKFAST BURRITO
OR
OATMEAL ROUND w/
yogurt
FRUIT
VARIETY JUICE
VARIETY MILK
FEBRUARY BREAKFAST MENU
Plemons-Stinnett-phillips
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
Cereal & Toast or
Cream of Wheat w/
Blueberry muffin
Fruit or Fruit Juice
4
Cereal & Toast or
Chicken-n-Biscuit
w/syrup
Fruit or Fruit Juice
5
Cereal & Toast or
Pancake on a stick
Oven Roasted potato
Fruit or Fruit Juice
6
Cereal & Toast or
Sunrise Sandwich
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
7
Cereal & Toast or
Breakfast Taco
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
8
9
10
Cereal & Toast or
French Toast Sticks
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
11
Cereal & Toast or
Biscuit & Gravy
Scrambled Eggs
Fruit or Fruit Juice
12
Cereal & Toast or
Breakfast Club
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
13
Cereal & Toast or
Chicken-n-Waffles
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
14
Cereal & Toast or
Breakfast Burrito
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
15
16
17 Cereal & Toast or
Pancakes
Bacon
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
18
Cereal & Toast or
Sunrise Sandwich
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
19
Cereal & Toast or
Biscuits & Gravy
Scrambled Eggs
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
20
Cereal & Toast or
Oatmeal
Cinnamon Texas Toast
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
21
Cereal & Toast or
Breakfast Burrito
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
22
23
24
Cereal & Toast or
Chicken-n-Waffles
w/syrup
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
25
Cereal & Toast or
Oatmeal Muffin Squares
Yogurt
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
26
Cereal & Toast or
Texas Toast
Scramble Eggs
Sausage Patty
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
27
Cereal & Toast or
Breakfast Club
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
28
Cereal & Toast or
Biscuits w/Gravy
Sausage
Fruit or Fruit Juice
Milk Variety
February 2014
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2 3
Toast Ham and Cheese
Baked Chips
(all campuses)
B&B Burrito (JH/HS)
Broccoli Bites
Garden Salad
Orange smiles
Milk Variety
4
Crispy Tacos
Spanish Rice
(all Campuses)
Southwest Chicken
Casserole
Tortilla Chips (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Charro Beans
Cinnamon
Milk Variety
5
Chicken Nuggets
(all Campuses)
Salisbury steak w/gravy
(JH/HS)
Mashed Potatoes
Carrots Coins
Strawberries & Bananas
Roll
Brownie (HS)
Milk variety
6
Spaghetti w Meatballs
(all campuses)
Breaded Pork Chop
Garden Salad
Savory green Beans
Sliced Peaches
Breadsticks
Pudding (HS)
Milk Variety
7
Turkey & Cheese Wrap (all
campuses)
Hot Dog (JH/HS)
Sweet Potato Fries
Cucumber Dippers
Fresh Fruit
Chocolate Chip Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
8
9 10
Chicken & Broccoli Penne
(all campuses)
Breadsticks
Pizza Dippers (JH/HS)
w/spaghetti Sauce
Garden Salad
Baby Carrots
Apple Slices
Pudding (HS)
Milk Variety
11
Ultimate Taco Salad
Spanish Rice (all)
Baked Potato w/Ham &
Cheese
Breadstick
Garden Salad
Snowball Salad
Milk Variety
12
Steak Fingers (all)
Chicken Nuggets (JH/HS)
Green Beans
Mashed Potatoes w/gravy
Apple-Pineapple D’Lite
Roll
Milk Variety
13
Chicken Quesadilla
(all Campuses)
BBQ on a bun (JH/HS)
Black Beans
Baby Carrots
Orange Smiles
Milk Variety
14
Pizza (all campuses)
Hamburger/Cheeseburger
(JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Veggie Cup
Mixed Fruit
Milk Variety
15
16 17
Cheese Enchiladas
Spanish Rice (all )
BBQ Rib Sandwich (JH/
HS)
Corn Chips
Refried Beans
Garden Salad
Cinnamon Apples
Milk Variety
18
Hot Dog (all campuses)
Stromboli (JH/HS)
Potato Rounds
Veggie Cup
Fresh Fruit
Choc. Chip Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
19
Grilled Cheese Sandwich
(all campuses)
Toasted Ham/Cheese
(JH/HS)
Veggie Soup
Baby Carrots
Fruit Cup
Milk Variety
20
Chicken Nugget
Mac & Cheese (all)
Meatball Sub (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Green Beans
Apple Slices
Crispy Cereal Treat
Milk Variety
21
Hamburger/Cheeseburger
(all)
Beef &Bean Burrito (JH/HS)
Seasoned Corn
Baby Carrots
Peaches
Milk Variety
22
23 24
Beef & Cheese Chalupas
(all campuses)
Chicken Quesadilla (JH/
HS)
Garden Salad
Refried Beans
Applesauce
Milk Variety
25
Country Fried Steak
(all)
Chicken Nuggets (JH/
HS)
Mashed Potatoes
Green Beans
Roll
Strawberry Cup
Milk Variety
26
Chicken Fajitas (all)
w/pepper & onions
Turkey & Cheese Wrap
(JH/HS)
Tortilla Chips (HS)
Charro Beans
Seasoned Corn
Oranges Smiles
Milk Variety
27
Chicken Spaghetti (all)
Popcorn Chicken (JH/
HS)
Garden Salad
Baby Carrots
Apple Slices
Breadsticks
Milk Variety
28
Fish Strips
Texas Toast (all campuses)
Hamburger/Cheeseburger
(JH/HS)
Hamburger Garnish
Sweet Potato Fries
Coleslaw
Sliced Peaches
Milk Variety
February 2014
Sanford-Fritch
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2
Hamburger/Cheeseburger (all)
Chicken Sandwich (JH/HS)
Hamburger Garnish
Potato Rounds
Western Beans
Diced Pears
Milk Variety
3
Orange Chicken (all campus)
w/Brown Rice
Pig in a Blanket (JH/HS)
Steamed Carrots and
Broccoli
Pineapple Tidbits
Milk Variety
4
Tex-Mex Stack (all campuses)
Spanish Rice
Refried Beans
Toasted Ham/Cheese (JH/HS)
w/ Multi-Grain Chips (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Hot Cinnamon Apples
Milk Variety
5
Stuffed BBQ Potatoes (all campus)
Texas Toast (1 K-8 2 9-12)
Chicken Fajita Salad (JH/HS)
w/ Tortilla Chips (JH/HS)
Spanish Rice (JH/HS)
Baby Carrots
Fresh fruit Bowl
Milk Variety
6
Chicken Parmesan (all campuses)
Breadstick ( 1 K-8 2 9-12)
Cheese Pizza (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Savory Green Beans
Fresh Apple Slices
Milk Variety
7
8 9
Toasted Ham/Cheese (all campus)
Beef/Bean Burrito (JH/HS)
Broccoli Bites
Garden Salad
Oranges Smiles
Milk Variety
10
Crispy Taco (all campuses) 2
Southwest Chicken (JH/HS)
w/ Tortilla Chips
Garden Salad
Charro Beans
Cinn. Applesauce
Milk Variety
11
Chicken Nuggets (all campuses)
Salisbury Steak (JH/HS)
Mashed Potatoes
Carrot Coins
Strawberries & Bananas
Roll
Brownie Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
12
Spaghetti w/ Meatballs (all)
Breaded Pork Chop (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Savory Green Beans
Sliced Peaches
Breadsticks ( 1 K-8 2 9-12)
Pudding (HS)
Milk Variety
13
Turkey Cheese Wraps (all)
Hot Dog (JH/HS)
Sweet Potato Fries
Cucumber Dippers
Fresh Fruit
Chocolate Chip Cookie (HS)
Milk Variety
14
15 16
Chicken Alfredo (all campuses)
Breadstick 2 (HS)
2 Pizza Dippers (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Baby carrots
Apple Slices
Breadsticks ( 1 K-8 2 9-12)
Milk Variety Pudding ( HS)
17
Ultimate Taco Salad (all )
Baked Potato (JH/HS)
w/ Ham & Cheese
Breadstick (JH 1 HS 2)
Garden Salad
Seasoned Corn
Snowball Salad
Milk Variety
18
Steak Fingers (all campuses)
Chicken Nuggets (JH/HS)
Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy
Savory Green Beans
Apple-Pineapple D’lite
Roll (HS)
Milk Variety
19
Chicken Quesadilla (all campuses)
BBQ on a bun (JH/HS)
Black Beans
Baby Carrots
Orange Smiles
Milk Variety
20
Pizza (all campuses)
Hamburger/Cheeseburger (JH/HS)
Garden Salad
Fresh Veggie Cup
Mixed Fruit
Milk Variety
21
22 23
HOLIDAY
24
HOLIDAY
25
HOLIDAY
26
HOLIDAY
27
HOLIDAY
29 30
HOLIDAY
31
HOLIDAY
December 2013 Lunch
Opportunities Inc.
Menu
Monday, February 17
Polish Sausage or
Chicken tneders. Red
cabbage with sweet and
sour sauce, Harvard
beets, or creamed peas.
German potato salad.
Black Forest parfait.
Whole wheat roll with
margarine. Milk, coffee,
tea or water.
Tuesday, February 18
King Ranch casserole
or spaghetti with meat
sauce. Green beans,
glazed carrots, or pinto
beans. Lettuce salad.
Sugar cookie with pine-
apple rings. wheat roll
or tortilla with marga-
rine. 2% milk, coffee,
tea, or water.
Wednesday, February 19
Smothered steak or la-
sagna. Mashed pota-
toes, mixed greens, or
hominy. Macaroni salad.
Peach short cake. Wheat
roll with margarine. 2%
milk, coffee, tea, or wa-
ter.
Thursday, February 20
BBQ chicken or beef
roast. Smothered pota-
toes, seasoned spinach,
or black eyed peas. Car-
rot salad. Sliced apples.
Wheat roll with marga-
rine. 2% milk, coffee,
tea, or water.
Friday, February 21
Pollock wedge with
lemon slice or chicken
fried steak. Lima beans,
potato wedges, or but-
tered corn. Coleslaw
with raisins. Lemon
cookie. Wheat roll or
corn bread with marga-
rine. 2% milk, coffee,
tea, or water.
Activities
Monday, February 17
Borger Duplicate
Bridge
1:00 - 5:00pm
Dominoes and pool
anytime
Tuesday, February 18
Borger Duplicate
Bridge 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Borger Creative Arts
9:00a.m.
Letter Carrier’s Meeting
5:30 p.m.
Dominoes and pool
anytime
Wednesday, February 19
Art Class - 9:00 am to
11:30 am
Accolade Home Health
“Love your heart”
11:00 to 12:00 noon
Opportunities Inc.
Board Meeting
12:00 noon
Wednesday Ladies’ Bridge
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Dominoes and pool
anytime
Thursday, February 20
Dominoes and pool
anytime
Friday, February 21
Dominoes and pool
anytime
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
Weekend February 15 & 16, 2014.pdf13.61 MB
View more articles in:
The 2015 football season is just around the corner, and the Borger football program will begin...
Day three of the Borger football camp resumed at Bulldog Stadium today. The camp will run through...
Day one of the Borger Football Camp began here in Borger at Bulldog Stadium on Monday. Look for...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes