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Wednesday January 22, 2014

January 22, 2014

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Shelby
McCarty
Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 19, 10 Pages
Wednesday, January 22, 2014
Stay
informed
of local news, weather,
sports, and other fun
and interesting events
around
Hutchinson County at
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Commuinity
Kids’ Page
Comics
Service Directory
Classifeds
Sports
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Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
Your Local Weather
Wed
1/22
53/23
Partly to
mostly
cloudy. High
53F. Winds
ENE at 5 to
10 mph.
Thu
1/23
22/19
Mostly
Cloudy.
Highs in the
low 20s and
lows in the
upper teens.
Fri
1/24
51/32
Mainly
sunny. Highs
in the low
50s and lows
in the low
30s.
Sat
1/25
64/35
Plenty of sun.
Highs in the
mid 60s and
lows in the
mid 30s.
Sun
1/26
66/32
Mainly
sunny. Highs
in the mid
60s and lows
in the low
30s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
“One’s own self is
well hidden from one’s
own self; of all mines of
treasure, one’s own is the
last to be dug up.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche
THE
IN 2014
TEMPERATURE
lowest
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Entry
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Page
2
Police uncover
thieves’ buried loot
On Saturday, January Just
before 6:00 a.m. Saturday
morning, at least one armed
person entered CEFCO’s 205
N. Cedar location where em-
ployee Brandie Ynojosa and
Assistant Manager Jeremy
Lynch were working, said
employees at the CEFCO
store.
The Borger Police Depart-
ment said in a press release
Saturday that evidence led
them to a residence at 1024
Thrams in Borger where
Rodger Dale Daniells and
Natalie Sue Daniells were
arrested for their alleged link
to the crime.
Investigation of several
burglaries and thefts in the
area led offcers to informa-
tion about an “elaborate”
hidden underground storage
area, said Capt. Anthony
Griffn in a press release is-
sued Tuesday afternoon. Of-
fcers obtained a search war-
rant for the back yard of the
residence at 1024 Thrams
and, while executing the
warrant, offcers uncovered
a “very well concealed and
constructed ‘cellar’” stocked
with a large amount of stolen
property linked to burglar-
ies and thefts from multiple
local businesses, homes and
churches, said Griffn.
The release noted that
items were also found link-
ing the scene to several sto-
len vehicles and vehicle bur-
glaries.
The Borger Police De-
partment has forwarded pho-
tographs of the scene in or-
der to demonstrate the scale
of the cellar. Due to the open
investigation, images of
evidence have been blocked
out.
The amount of stolen
property located was im-
mense. Investigators are on
location processing and cata-
loguing the items in an at-
tempt to identify and contact
the rightful owners.
“They are still going
through it,” Griffn said on
Tuesday afternoon, “we’ve
probably closed a lot of cas-
es.”
Roger Dale and Natalie
Sue Daniels remain in custo-
dy and the BPD said, “Addi-
tional charges are likely to be
fled on parties involved...”
Offcers from the Borger Police Department excavate a hidden underground storage area and catalogue evidence at 1024 Thrams - Photos provided by Borger Police Dept
JC Cortez
Editor
editor@borgernewsherald.com
Rodger Dale Daniells, 36, and Natalie Sue Daniells, 28, remain in
police custody for their alleged connection to several crimes.
My father moved the frst
home I remember from its
original placement where
the Borger High School now
rests. My earliest recollec-
tions take place in a fenced
yard at 319 N. McGee
Street. My parents never
permitted us to go outside
the perimeters of that fence,
but one day, I ventured out
and experienced the begin-
ning of a lifetime of irratio-
nal fear. Some neighborhood
children walked by and told
me that they were going to
Ronald Keranen’s house. He
had a tub of turtles. I wanted
to see too. He lived down on
the corner, and I only had to
cross one street.
When we arrived,
Ronald was holding a turtle.
My Farnsworth grandmoth-
er told me about turtles: “Be
careful. If they ever bite
you, they don’t let go until it
thunders.” Even at six years
old, I knew that it was a long
time from one thunder to the
next in the Texas Panhandle.
When the turtle opened his
chomps and grabbed the
little blond Ronald, I ran
for dear life. I know I didn’t
look before crossing the
street. Momma never knew
of my sin, but I don’t re-
member ever opening the
gate again. In bed that night,
I prayed for thunder because
I knew Ronald needed my
prayers. On Monday, at
Central Elementary School,
Ronald was sitting in his
chair, and he looked okay.
I never asked him how he
got loose because God did
not answer my prayer with a
“yes for rain.”
I played with horny
toads, red ants, doodlebugs,
roly-polies, and caterpil-
lars, but I never went near a
turtle. By the fourth grade,
I was living on Kickbusch
Street, and my best bike-
riding companion was Fran-
cisca Viola Boren. I loved
saying her poetic name. She
lived a block over from me.
Her mom kept the shiniest
foors I had ever witnessed.
We had to take our shoes
off before we entered the
house. I knew I could run a
few paces and slide on the
foors, but I certainly did
nothing to call attention to
my socks with holes in the
heels. Mrs. Boren had home-
made dill pickles under one
of the beds. She took a jar
out and allowed us one giant
dill pickle most days after
school. After we sucked all
the juice and nibbled lei-
surely at our treasurers, we
took off on our bikes.
After learning every nook
and cranny in the neighbor-
hood, we found friends who
showed us their secret plac-
es. Off of Garrett Street, a
barbed-wire fence stretched,
dividing the city from the
country. Our friends knew
of a great pond not far from
the street. We piled our bikes
up and slipped through the
fence. First, we wandered
across pastures that blessed
our eyes with yellow butter-
cups, wild daisies, and yuc-
cas, which we avoided. In
the pasture, sat a concrete
fort, the ruins of some giant
building, for us to play in,
but it didn’t hold the same
pull as the pond.
A lazy creek followed a
ridge of hills, and in one of
bends, the waters pooled into
a clear pond perfected for
skinny-dipping on summer
days. Except for one thing!
The pool’s waters were so
clear that we could see the
bottom and everything in the
pool. The pool was infested
with turtles. I know I saw at
least one. My smallest toe
rebelled at the pool. I did
not even like to sit around
the edge of the pool because
turtles entered and exited
from nearby rocks. I offered
to be the watch guard in case
some boy crossed by. I nev-
er saw another human pass
nearby in the couple of years
that we frequented the pond.
The girls swam in their un-
derwear and knew it would
dry long before we reached
home. We found a haven, a
treasure, except for the de-
mon turtles.
We moved again, only
this time to Stinnett. My
younger junior-high aged
brother Jerry was seated
“shotgun.” Janis and I rode
in the back. Suddenly Jerry
shouted out, “Watch out! A
herd of turtles!” Mother in-
stinctively hit the brakes and
frantically asked, “Where?”
This was pre-seatbelt days,
so Janis and I slammed our
heads against the front seats.
I don’t know why Mom
didn’t backhand him right
then and there. We females
were trembling while Jerry
laughed. He should have
known better. It’s a herd of
cattle, cranes, deer, giraffes,
goats and asses. It’s a murder
of crows, busyness of fer-
rets, skein of geese in fight,
a bloat of hippopotami, a
troop of monkeys, a knot of
toads, and a pandemonium
of parrots. It is not a herd of
turtles. It’s a bale of turtles,
and Mom should have back-
handed him twice.
Judy Hart
Guest Writer
Demon turtles and irrational fear
WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 22, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2
Obituaries
Local Weather
A backdoor cold front pushing from the northeast to the southwest will affect the Pan-
handles today, causing high temperatures to run about 10 degrees cooler than what we experi-
enced Tuesday afternoon. Highs will warm to near 50 degrees as a mostly sunny sky prevails.
Light winds from the north will blow at the beginning of the day before they become more
easterly at 10-20 mph as the day wares on.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Alyssa Pawlak
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
POLICE REPORT
Calls for Service
01.08.14
- Cody Lynn Corbitt, 32, for pos-
session of a controlled substance PG
1>=1G<4G, resisting arrest, search, or
transport MA, theft > + $50 < $500
01.09.14
- Michael Vincent Dally, 30, for no
operator/drivers license
01.10.14
- Kenneth Wayne Coburn for criminal
trespass
- Andres Alejandro Gamez, 21, on a
warrant
- Joshua Jay Sims, 37, on two warrants
01.11.14
- Tyler Scott Madere, 19, for public
intoxication
- Logan Eugenio Carrillo, 23, for pub-
lic intoxication
- Darrell Edward Duffeld, 44, for
driving while license invalid, displaying
an expired motor vehicle inspection cer-
tifcate, and possession/delivery of drug
paraphernalia
01.12.14
- Olin Trumane Jackson, 35, for failure
to comply with requirements on striking
fxtures on highway
- Andy Mario Campolla, 33, for resist-
ing arrest, search, or transport MA, and
assault causing bodily injury to a family
member
01.13.14
- Lisa Ann Young, 45, for driving
while license suspended/invalid, and pos-
session of a dangerous drug
01.14.14
- Haskell Dewey Swink, 34, for driv-
ing with license suspended/invalid
01.15.14
- George Larry Mofftt II, 48, for pub-
lic intoxication with three prior convic-
tions
- Diana Lee Ortiz, 23, on a warrant
Calls for Service
01.08.14
- Turner & Baker for a reckless driver
- Gardner for suspicious activity
- Hwy 136 & Hwy 1551 for suspicious
activity
- S. Florida for a welfare check
- Allsup’s on Wilson for a reckless
driver
- E. 1st for report of a burglary
- Borger Shopping Plaza for a theft
in-progress
- Bowie for shots fred
01.09.14
- S. Cedar for report of a burglary
- S. Main for report of a burgalry
- W. Wilson for report of a burglary
- Butadieno for a hit-and-run accident
- W. Wilson for a disturbance
- Veta for suspicious activity
- W. 10th for a theft in-progress
- Wilson & Main for suspicious activ-
ity
- Boyd for a disturbance
- 3rd & Cedar for report of an accidnet
- S. Florida for a missing person
- Beech for criminal mischief
01.10.14
- W. 10th for harassment
- Bennigan’s for suspicious activity
- W. Wilson for criminal trespass
- W. 1st for report of an accident
- W. Wilson for a disturbance
- W. Wilson for criminal trespass
- Dolomita for criminal mischief
- Evergreen for suspicious activity
- W. Ocla for suspicious activity
- Hwy 152 for lost/recovered property
- Alabama for a warrant service
- Florida for suspicious activity
Anita Savage presided
over our meeting. Dixie
Isom and Anita Savage of
Kumjoinus, Mary K. Har-
bor and Megan Parr were
present.. The new agent,
from Lipscomb County was
a guest. Cassidy Peek is
from Sweetwater.
The start for the 4-H
Livestock Show at the
dome begins Thursday eve-
ning and all day Friday and
Saturday will be full days
of activity. We have 73
members in 4-H . Several
animals will be shown.
Megan gave a program
at “Living Waters”and has
two other meetings sched-
uled later this month else-
where’
We have accounts at
two banks and decided to
remedy this. Mary K. Har-
bor made a motion that
we remove the Hutchinson
County 4-H Scholarship
Fund and place it in Pantex
with our others. Since Betty
Barkley is not on the coun-
cil she needed to have her
name removed from the ac-
count.Dixie Isom seconded
the motion and it carried by
all..
Anita Savage made the
motion to replace her with
June Jackson It was vot-
ed on and approved.. The
new name can not use the
word “county”. So it will
be under “Hutchinson EEA
Scholarships”. This too was
approved.
Dixie Isom made the
motion to transfer the
“Hutchinson County Pecan
Fund” to the Kumjoinus
EEA under the names of
Anita Savage and Dixie
Isom .since we are the only
club who will be selling
nuts. Mary K. seconded the
motion and the removal of
Betty Barkley’s name on
the account. The motion
passed and was approved
by all. This account is pres-
ently at Pantex. Kumjoi-
nus will set up their own ac-
count, after the removal.
Betty is in bad health
and her club members are
also. We felt it would be a
relief and less stress on her
and her members. At pres-
ent none of them are on the
council as offcers or are
able to sell nuts.
Each club will donate
$25 to the 4-H Livestock
Show and $25 toward a
4-H Scholarship Fund.Both
are due now.
Those who paid the
registration and meal fee
for the Perryton meeting ,
which was canceled due to
the weather, are suppose to
have their money returned.
We haven’t heard or re-
ceived anything as of yet.
The proposed meeting was
in December.
We picked up our new
year books and can now add
in our programs.
The next council meet-
ing will be the 2nd Friday
of March, on the 14th at 2
p.m.
Our clubs enrollments
are decreasing and we en-
courage clubs to increase
their membership if pos-
sible.
Hutchinson County
Council meeting recap
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
For Tickets or Questions Call 806-274-8553
Seats 8 People
RSVP Now...Seating Limited
If anyone would like to donate at the auction or would like to donate to a single child this year, please call 806-274-8553 for more information.
Gayle Wright, 76, of Stinnett, was welcomed
home by the Lord on Monday, January 20, 2014. Gayle was
born August 15, 1937 in Amarillo, TX. She married Clarence
Wright in 1963 and he preceded her in death in 2008.
Services will be 2:00 p.m., Wednesday at the First United
Methodist Church of Stinnett with Rev.Rhonda Greenwood,
of Merkel, TX, and Rev. Donald Ward offciating. Burial will
follow in the Stinnett Cemetery under the direction of Minton
Chatwell Funeral Home.
Gayle was a lifetime Hutchinson County resident where
she was a charter member of the First United Methodist
Church of Stinnett. She was a graduate of Stinnett High
School and attended Texas Tech University.
In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by a son Cody Wright in 1977 and
parents Jack and Hazel Lasater.
Gayle is lovingly survived by daughters, Gina Stills of Fritch, and Leia Montgomery and
husband Mark of Conroe, TX; a brother, Jack (Butch) Lasater and wife Mary Ann of Spear-
man, TX; grandson, Patrick Konechney; granddaughter, Sierra Stills; great-granddaughter
Kinley Montgomery; numerous nieces and nephews; special long time friends, Pat Johnson
of Stratford, and Shirley Heard of Lubbock.
Family request that memorials be made to First United Methodist Church of Stinnett, P.O.
Box 1192, Stinnett, TX 79083.
Vicki L. Baker, 65, of Weatherford, TX, passed
away, Sunday, January 19, 2014 in Fort Worth, TX.
Vicki L. Baker was born February 23, 1948 in Borger to
Kenneth and Juanita (Knight) Bell. She was retired from the
Federal Government in the Criminal Justice Department.
Mrs. Baker is preceded in death by her father Kenneth
Bell.
Survivors include a son David Aaron and wife Chesley
Baker of Fayetteville, NC, daughter Amy Lynn and husband
Christopher Bonnett of Weatherford, TX, mother Juanita Bell
of Midland, brother Ken R. and wife Becky Bell of Amarillo,
two sisters Beverly Bennett of Midland, and Cheri and hus-
band Mike Branham of Midland. She is also survived by fve
grandchildren Colter, Cannan, and Caden Baker and Caitlynn and Ashley Bonnett.
Viewing will be at Brown Chapel Of The Fountains on Thursday, January 23, 2014, from
8:00AM to 8:00PM and Friday, January 24, 2014 from 8:00 AM till service time.
Family will receive friends from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM on Thursday, January 23, 2014.
Funeral services will be held at 10:00AM, Friday, January 24, 2014 at Brown Chapel Of
The Fountains with Pastor Kermit Bell offciating. Burial will follow at Westlawn Memorial
Park.
Send personal condolences to www.brownfuneraldirectors.net.
January 24
HCJLA Livestock Show
at Borger’s Aluminum
Dome
8:00 am - Concession Stand
Opens
8:45 am - Opening Flag
Ceremony
Livestock events all day long
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100
S. Hedgecoke, Borger. Call
273-5621 or 857-3947 for
more information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian
Church, 200 S. Bryan, 6
p.m. Call 806-382-2449
or 806-273-6017 for more
information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist
Church Borger Fellowship
Hall 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. child care is provided.
Call FBC 263-5621 for
information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medi-
cal Field Employees in
Hutchinson County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College
Cafeteria in the Gallery
Room For more informa-
tion call Aileen Jackson at
274-9890or Betty Jordon at
857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Pres-
byterian Church, 418 W.
Coolidge, 8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more
information.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100
S. Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, sec-
ond foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6
p.m.
Tuesdays
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for
life challenges, 6:30 p.m.,
That One Place Commu-
nity Center, 212 E. Broad-
way, Fritch. Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria
Call 274-3321 for more
information.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9
a.m. Call 886-0299 for
more information.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stin-
nett Senior Citizen Build-
ing, 6:30 p.m. Call 878-
2960 or 878-3272 for more
information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Minis-
try, 7 p.m. Call 857-3975
for location.
Alibates Creek Indian
Dancers, 7 p.m., Trinity
Lutheran Church, 212 W.
Jefferson. Call 274-3239
for more information.
VFW Post #1789 meets at
the VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden
Plains Community Hos-
pital Board Room, 1 p.m.
Call 467-5732 for more
information.
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure and blood sugar
screenings, Opportunities
Center, 11 a.m. to noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce,
6:30 p.m. Call 806-878-
4026.
Vietnam Veterans of
America Chapter 404, 403
S Cornell in Fritch, 5:30
p.m. dinner and 6:00 meet-
ings. Call 857-3950 for
more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure screenings, MAL’S
Café, Stinnett, 8 a.m. to 9
a.m.
Phillips Alumni Associa-
tion, Frank Phillips Col-
lege Gallery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post
0671 meets at 7:30 pm
at the American Legion
post next to the Aluminum
Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospi-
tal Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art
10:30-12 St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s wel-
come, Doors open 5 pm,
Cards sold starting at 6
p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm,
$14 each packet of 13
games or 6 papers for each
of 13 games,
Additional papers half
packets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more
information.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge,
7:30 p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost
Children Grief Support
Group, New U on Main
Street, 7 p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more
information.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Second Thursdays
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen
Sunshine Club, 12 noon for
lunch followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m., 305 N. Deahl. Call
273-7127 or see fellow-
shipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure and blood sugar
screenings, Fritch Sunshine
Club, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Menno-
nite Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
United Supermarket, 9
a.m. to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class,
10 a.m., Golden Plains
Community Hospital
Board Room. Call 467-
5718 or 467-5857 for more
information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Call 878-2597 for
more information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor
Home Owners Assoc., 10
a.m., Club House.
Marine Corps League
Hawthorne Det. #1349,
9 a.m., 421 E. Broadway,
Stinnett.
Young adults Christian
marriage class, Word
of Life Church, 9:45
a.m.Sundays, Wednesdays,
Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcot-
ics Anonymous, Valley
Drive west entrance, Cedar
Street, 7:30 p.m. Call 806-
570-2028 or 857-4038 for
more information
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 22, 2014 Borger News- Herald
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
NEW Dual Action
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helps flaws disappear
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This means you can
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Recipe of the Day
Grillmasters relish the return of
warm weather, which not only signals
the return of sunny skies, but also
marks the return of grilling season.
Devoted grillmasters might not be
deterred by cold weather, but many
people put the grill away at the onset
of winter and anxiously await their
frst opportunity to fre up the grill
once winter has fnally ended.
This grilling season, get things off
on the right foot with the following
recipe for “Thai Sweet & Sour Ribs”
from Eric Treuille and Birgit Erath’s
“Grilling” (DK Publishing).
Thai Sweet & Sour Ribs
Serves 4
- 4 pounds pork spareribs
- 1 red onion, fnely chopped
- 2 garlic cloves, crushed
- 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
- 1 tablespoon peanut oil
- 1/2 cup pineapple juice
- 2 tablespoons fsh sauce
- 1/4 cup tomato paste
- 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
- 2 tablespoons honey
- 1/3 cup Thai sweet chili sauce
Separate ribs by slicing the bones
with a large knife or cleaver. Simmer
separated ribs in large pan of salted
water until just tender, about 30 min-
utes. Drain.
Rinse under cold running water
and rinse again. Let cool completely.
Place onion, garlic, ginger, and oil in
a small pan. Stir fry over medium heat
until softened, about 5 to 10 minutes.
Add pineapple juice, fsh sauce, to-
mato paste, lime juice, honey and 2
tablespoons sweet chili sauce. Bring
to a boil. Simmer gently until thick,
10 minutes. Let cool completely.
Brush the sweet and sour mixture
over the ribs. Grill according to in-
structions below, basting with the re-
maining chili sauce throughout. Serve
hot.
When using an outdoor grill:
Grill over medium-hot coals,
turning frequently and basting, until
brown and crusty, 15 minutes.
When using a broiler:
Preheat broiler. Broil, removing
from under the broiler every 5 min-
utes to baste, until brown and crusty,
15 minutes.
Think ahead:
Precook the ribs up to 1 day in ad-
vance. Cool completely. Cover with
plastic wrap and refrigerate. Make
glaze up to 1 day in advance. Cover
and refrigerate. Note: Precook the
ribs in simmering water to remove
the layer of outer fat. This not only
prevents fare-ups during cooking,
but also allows the rib meat to stay
tender and juicy inside and crispy on
the outside.
Let ribs mark the
return of grilling season
3
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JANUARY 22, 2014 Borger News- Herald
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4
TODAY IN HISTORY
1877 – Arthur Tooth, an
Anglican clergyman is taken
into custody after being pros-
ecuted for using ritualist prac-
tices.
1879 – Anglo-Zulu War:
Battle of Isandlwana – Zulu
troops defeat British troops.
1879 – Anglo-Zulu War:
Battle of Rorke’s Drift – 139
British soldiers successfully
defend their garrison against
an onslaught by three to four
thousand Zulu warriors.
1889 – Columbia Phono-
graph is formed in Washing-
ton, D.C.
1890 – The United Mine
Workers of America is found-
ed in Columbus, Ohio.
1899 – Leaders of six
Australian colonies meet in
Melbourne to discuss confed-
eration.
1901 – Edward VII is pro-
claimed King after the death
of his mother, Queen Victo-
ria.
1905 – Bloody Sunday in
St. Petersburg, beginning of
the 1905 revolution.
1915 – Over 600 people
are killed in Guadalajara,
Mexico, when a train plunges
off the tracks into a deep can-
yon.
1917 – World War I: Pres-
ident Woodrow Wilson of
the still-neutral United States
calls for “peace without vic-
tory” in Europe.
1919 – Act Zluky is
signed, unifying the Ukrai-
nian People’s Republic and
the West Ukrainian National
Republic.
1924 – Ramsay MacDon-
ald becomes the frst Labour
Prime Minister of the United
Kingdom.
1927 – Teddy Wakelam
gives the frst live radio com-
mentary of a football match
anywhere in the world, be-
tween Arsenal F.C. and Shef-
feld United at Highbury.
1941 – World War II:
British and Commonwealth
troops capture Tobruk from
Italian forces during Opera-
tion Compass.
1944 – World War II: The
Allies commence Operation
Shingle, an assault on Anzio,
Italy.
1946 – In Iran, Qazi Mu-
hammad declares the inde-
pendent people’s Republic
of Mahabad at Chuwarchira
Square in the Kurdish city
of Mahabad. He is the new
president and Hadschi Baba
Scheich is the prime minister.
1946 – Creation of the
Central Intelligence Group,
forerunner of the Central In-
telligence Agency.
1947 – KTLA, the frst
commercial television station
west of the Mississippi River,
begins operation in Holly-
wood, California.
1957 – Israel withdraws
from the Sinai Peninsula.
1957 – The New York
City “Mad Bomber”, George
P. Metesky, is arrested in Wa-
terbury, Connecticut and is
charged with planting more
than 30 bombs.
1959 – Knox Mine Disas-
ter: Water breaches the River
Slope Mine near Pittston City,
Pennsylvania in Port Griffth;
12 miners are killed.
1962 – The Organization
of American States suspends
Cuba’s membership.
1963 – The Elysée trea-
ty of cooperation between
France and Germany is
signed by Charles de Gaulle
and Konrad Adenauer.
1968 – Apollo 5 lifts off
carrying the frst Lunar mod-
ule into space.
1968 – Operation Igloo
White, a US electronic sur-
veillance system to stop com-
munist infltration into South
Vietnam begins installation.
1969 – A gunman attempts
to assassinate Soviet leader
Leonid Brezhnev.
1970 – The Boeing 747,
the world’s frst “jumbo jet”,
enters commercial service for
launch customer Pan Ameri-
can Airways with its maiden
voyage from John F. Ken-
nedy International Airport to
London Heathrow Airport.
1973 – The Supreme Court
of the United States delivers
its decision in Roe v. Wade,
legalizing elective abortion in
all ffty states.
1973 – A chartered Boe-
ing 707 explodes in fames
upon landing at Kano Airport,
Nigeria, killing 176.
1984 – The Apple Macin-
tosh, the frst consumer com-
puter to popularize the com-
puter mouse and the graphical
user interface, is introduced
during Super Bowl XVIII
with its famous “1984” tele-
vision commercial.
1987 – Pennsylvania poli-
tician R. Budd Dwyer shoots
and kills himself during a
televised press conference,
leading to debates on bound-
aries in journalism.
1987 – Philippine security
forces open fre on a crowd of
10,000–15,000 demonstrators
at Malacañan Palace, Manila,
killing 13.
1990 – Robert Tappan
Morris, Jr. is convicted of
releasing the 1988 Internet
Computer worm.
1991 – Gulf War: Three
SCUDs and one Patriot mis-
sile hit Ramat Gan in Israel,
injuring 96 people. Three el-
derly people die of heart at-
tacks.
1992 – Rebel forces oc-
cupy Zaire’s national ra-
dio station in Kinshasa and
broadcast a demand for the
government’s resignation.
1995 – Israeli-Palestinian
confict: Beit Lid massacre –
In central Israel, near Netan-
ya, two suicide bombers from
the Gaza Strip blow them-
selves up at a military transit
point killing 19 Israelis.
1999 – Australian mission-
ary Graham Staines and his
two sons are burned alive by
radical Hindus while sleeping
in their car in Eastern India.
2002 – Kmart becomes
the largest retailer in United
States history to fle for Chap-
ter 11 bankruptcy protection.
2006 – Evo Morales is in-
augurated as President of Bo-
livia, becoming the country’s
frst indigenous president.
2007 – At least 88 peo-
ple are killed when two car
bombs explode in the Bab
Al-Sharqi market in central
Baghdad, Iraq.
Opinion
In the State of Texas, the
Offce of the Attorney Gen-
eral (OAG) is charged with
administering the state’s
child support collection
agency. As a result, the OAG
is responsible for collecting
child support for more than
one million Texas families.
Fortunately, the vast major-
ity of Texas parents provide
their children the fnancial
resources and support they
need to grow healthy and
strong. Because some cases
require additional work,
however, we have a team of
professionals who work to
ensure parents fulfll their
courtordered child support
obligations.
Thanks to the thousands
of Texas parents who comply
with their child support or-
ders – and a lot of hard work
by the dedicated folks in our
child support division – we
collected a record-breaking
$3.6 billion during the 2013
fscal year. For the past six
years, Texas has ranked frst
in the nation for total child
support collections – despite
the fact that we did not have
the nation’s highest caseload.
The Texas child support
program was also among
the highestranking in the
nation for effciency and ef-
fectiveness.
Collecting child support
is about more than provid-
ing young Texans the food,
clothing and support they
need today. It’s about lay-
ing the foundation for them
to become successful adults.
Research shows that children
who receive support from
their parents have fewer be-
havioral problems, make bet-
ter grades and stay in school
longer than children whose
parents are uninvolved in
their lives and fail to support
them. In addition, studies
show that children with two
involved and caring parents
are more selfconfdent, more
likely to exercise selfcontrol,
and less likely to engage in
risky behaviors as teenagers.
Unfortunately, some
young Texans never beneft
from steady child support
payments. Many of their
mothers and fathers have
the ability to pay, but sim-
ply do not fulfll their legal
obligations to support their
children. After a parent re-
peatedly refuses to pay child
support, law enforcement
may have to get involved.
When that happens, the OAG
works closely with local au-
thorities to ensure parents
comply with the law.
Child Support Roundups
When all other enforce-
ment efforts prove unsuc-
cessful, the OAG can ask
a court to impose jail time
for delinquent parents who
violate court orders to pay
child support. In 2013, the
OAG’s Child Support Divi-
sion partnered with 15 local
law enforcement agencies to
launch countywide sweeps
that located and arrested
parents who were wanted by
authorities for failing to pay
court-ordered child support.
Because of these initiatives,
local law enforcement off-
cers arrested more than 270
parents who violated court
orders requiring them to pay
child support.
Criminal Nonsupport
Failure to pay child sup-
port is not just a civil viola-
tion. Under Texas law, par-
ents who intentionally or
knowingly fail to comply
with a court’s child support
orders commit a state jail
felony. Prosecuting viola-
tors for criminal nonsupport
holds them accountable for
breaking the law and dis-
courages parents from refus-
ing to make court-ordered
child support payments.
In light of the ongoing
national economic downturn,
some delinquent parents may
have lost their jobs or suf-
fered salary reductions. In
these cases, parents can ask
the courts to modify their
support obligations. This pro-
cess helps ensure that parents
who are actually incapable of
fulflling their child support
obligations do not face pros-
ecution because of changed
fnancial circumstances.
Like most law enforce-
ment efforts, collaboration
among state, local and fed-
eral authorities is critical to
achieving success. In No-
vember, for example, sheriffs
from fve South Texas coun-
ties coordinated and launched
a joint operation that led to
the arrest of 152 area parents
who violated court orders
requiring them to pay child
support. All parents arrested
in the roundup were the sub-
jects of arrest warrants be-
cause of their failure to pay
child support. Investigators
with the OAG’s Child Sup-
port Division assisted the
local sheriffs’ departments
by providing logistical as-
sistance to locate the missing
parents. Thanks to effective
working relationships with
local sheriffs, constables,
police departments and dis-
trict and county attorneys,
the OAG operates the na-
tion’s top child support pro-
gram. Our successes beneft
not only Texas children, but
also the taxpayers – because
collecting child support
helps ensure that children
are supported by their par-
ents, not by taxpayer-funded
programs. By continuing to
work to collect child support
for Texas children, we have
an opportunity to ensure they
have a brighter future and the
opportunity for success.
– January 2014
Child support enforcement
brings hope to Texas families
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2012
Greg Abbott
Texas Attorney General
WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 22, 2014
Borger News- Herald
5
Community
COLLEGE STATION,
TX – Dr. Leif Andersson,
a 2013-16 Texas A&M
University Institute for Ad-
vanced Study (TIAS) Fac-
ulty Fellow from Uppsala
University, Sweden, was
chosen as a recipient of the
2014 Wolf Prize in Agricul-
ture, the Wolf Foundation
announced Thursday. Dr.
Andersson will be sharing
the award, and its $100,000
prize, with Jorge Dub-
covsky of the University
of California Davis, as they
are both being honored for
their use of cutting-edge
genomic technologies that
contribute to animal and
plant research, respectively.
The Wolf Prize is often re-
ferred to as equivalent to
the Nobel Prize.
“Dr. Andersson is highly
deserving of the Wolf Prize
in Agriculture,” said Dr.
David Threadgill, professor
and director of the Whole
Systems Genomic Initiative
(WSGI) at Texas A&M. “He
is the leading geneticist us-
ing the latest genomic tools
to reveal the genetic control
of many important produc-
tion traits in agricultural
animals. There is no other
scientist who has been as
successful over the last 10
years as Dr. Andersson has
been in studying many dif-
ferent species and traits.”
As a TIAS fellow, Dr.
Andersson has been col-
laborating with faculty in
the Texas A&M College of
Veterinary Medicine & Bio-
medical Sciences (CVM)
since November 2013. His
research involves compar-
ing the genomes of many
species of domestic animals
to discover the molecular
mechanisms and underly-
ing traits that are important
to human and veterinary
medicine. Texas A&M Uni-
versity System Chancellor,
John Sharp, who initiated
the investment in TIAS,
said, “We are all very proud
of TIAS and specifcally,
Dr. Andersson. His work
will infuence the future of
sustainable food production
for the entire world.”
Dr. Andersson analyzes
interbreeding among spe-
cies of domestic animals
to identify the genes and
mutations that affect spe-
cifc traits. This research
has led to the development
of genomic and marker- as-
sisted selection as a means
to identify breeding stock
with specifc useful and ec-
onomically important char-
acteristics. These advances
in livestock selection have
replaced the more classic
selection methods based on
visible traits, and are an es-
sential contribution to sus-
tainable feeding of a grow-
ing world population.
“I congratulate Dr. An-
dersson being awarded the
prestigious Wolf Prize. His
breakthrough work in ge-
nomic technologies is an
example of the positive im-
pact that he and our Texas
A&M University faculty
are having on Texas, the
nation, and the world,” said
Dr. Mark Hussey, interim
president of Texas A&M
University.
One area of Dr. Anders-
son’s research with potential
crossover to humans is his
work on the genetic basis of
muscle physiology and mo-
tor coordination in horses.
This has led to insights into
how their genes affect their
gait. These discoveries may
also have important impli-
cations for human diseases
such as cerebral palsy.
“We are excited about
Dr. Andersson’s recogni-
tion as a recipient of the
Wolf Prize in Agriculture,”
said Dr. Eleanor M. Green,
Carl B. King Dean of Vet-
erinary Medicine. “His
international reputation
and expertise in functional
genomics, combined with
the world-class genomics
faculty already in place at
the CVM, will be integral
in fostering innovative One
Health collaborations and
leading-edge discovery.
Special thanks to TIAS
and to our university lead-
ership, who provided the
opportunity to bring these
world-renowned scholars
to our campus. This effort,
led by Texas A&M Univer-
sity Chancellor John Sharp
and directed by Dr. Junkins,
has provided a wealth of
opportunity to Texas A&M
and to the communities we
serve.”
The new Wolf Prize
laureates will receive their
awards in May from the
president of Israel and Is-
rael’s minister of education
during a ceremony at the
Knesset Building (the seat
of Israel´s Parliament) in
Jerusalem. “I am extreme-
ly proud to be recognized
with an international prize
of this dignity,” Dr. Ander-
sson said. Five or six Wolf
Prizes have been awarded
annually since 1978 to
outstanding individuals in
the felds of agriculture,
chemistry, mathematics,
medicine, physics, and the
arts. According to the Wolf
Foundation’s website, a
total of 253 scientists and
artists from 23 countries
have been honored to date.
This year, fve prizes were
awarded to eight individu-
als in four countries. Dr.
Andersson is the fourth ag-
riculture winner of the Wolf
Prize associated with Texas
A&M: Dr. Perry Adkisson
won in 1995, Dr. James
Womack in 2001, and Dr.
Fuller Bazer in 2002.
“This recognition of the
excellence of his work is
also refective of the over-
all quality of the stellar tal-
ent TIAS is attracting as
Faculty Fellows,” said Dr.
John Junkins, distinguished
professor of aerospace en-
gineering, and founding di-
rector of TIAS. “Each year,
TIAS is bringing the fnest
academics in the world to
Texas A&M for collabora-
tion with our faculty and
students. Of the frst ff-
teen scholars that TIAS has
brought to Texas A&M two
have won the Nobel Prize,
one has been awarded the
National Medal of Sci-
ence, and now one has been
awarded the Wolf Prize. In-
deed, we are delighted by
the ongoing contributions to
our programs by all ffteen
of the highly distinguished
scholars attracted to date as
TIAS Faculty Fellows.”
The prizes are given
by the Wolf Foundation,
which was established in
1975 by Dr. Ricardo Wolf,
a German-born inventor,
diplomat, and philanthro-
pist, who lived the last few
years of his life in Israel.
The winners are chosen by
international prize commit-
tees made up of experts in
each feld.
“We are extremely for-
tunate to be hosting Dr. An-
dersson as a TIAS fellow in
our department, where he
is a delightful and inspiring
colleague,” said Dr. Evelyn
Tiffany-Castiglioni, associ-
ate dean for undergraduate
education, professor, and
head of the Department of
Veterinary Integrative Bio-
sciences at the CVM. “Dr.
Andersson works across
a broad range of species;
this and his extraordinary
powers of observation have
been of tremendous value
to faculty and students in
the college.”
Dr. Andersson directed
the Animal Genetics com-
ponent of the Nordic Cen-
tre of Excellence in Disease
Genetics (NCoEDG) that
was in operation until 2011
and his research group has
done pioneering work in
this feld. NCoEDG in-
volved investigators from
Denmark, Finland, and
Sweden working in fve
Nordic Universities pool-
ing their expertise, meth-
odological power, and re-
sources to study the genetic
background of metabolic
syndrome, autoimmune and
infammatory diseases, and
colon cancer. Dr. Anders-
son’s expertise in animal
model development and
experience with multi- in-
stitutional collaborative
research in NCoEDG can
provide exceptional insights
as the Texas A&M College
of Veterinary Medicine &
Biomedical Sciences po-
sitions itself to become a
major contributor to the
WSGI and the One Health
program.
A world-renowned sci-
entist who has published
more than 330 scientifc
articles and has received
six patents and fled appli-
cations for two more, Dr.
Andersson has mentored 25
students to doctorate or pro-
fessional degrees. He has
also been uniquely elected
to four major scientifc royal
societies in Sweden (Royal
Swedish Society for Ag-
riculture and Forestry, the
Royal Swedish Academy of
Sciences, Royal Society of
Sciences in Uppsala and the
Royal Physiographic So-
ciety in Lund) and was re-
cently elected as a Foreign
Member of the US National
Academy of Sciences. Dr.
Andersson has received
numerous other prizes: the
Thureus Prize in Natural
History and Medicine from
the Royal Society of Sci-
ences, the Linneus Prize
in Zoology from the Royal
Physiographic Society in
Lund, the Hilda and Alfred
Eriksson’s Prize in Medi-
cine from the Royal Swed-
ish Academy of Sciences,
and the Olof Rudbeck Prize
from Upsala Medical Soci-
ety.
For more information
about the Texas A&M Col-
lege of Veterinary Medicine
& Biomedical Sciences,
please visit our website at
http://vetmed.tamu.edu or
join us on Facebook. For
more information about
the Texas A&M Institute
for Advanced Study visit
the TIAS site at http://tias.
tamu.edu/.
Professor Wins Prestigious International Prize
AMARILLO, TEXAS
- (January 17, 2014) -
The Amarillo Symphony,
(www.amarillosymphony.
org), the leader of orches-
tral music in the Texas
Panhandle since 1924,
today announces that due
to a family illness music
director and conductor Ja-
como Rafael Bairos will
not be conducting the In-
timate Evening concerts.
Guest conductor Yaniv
Dinur will lead the or-
chestra for these concerts
on January 24 and 25 at
the Globe-News Center
for the Performing Arts.
Considered “a passion-
ate and insightful musi-
cian,” by Michael Tilson
Thomas – the music di-
rector of the San Francis-
co Symphony and artistic
director of the New World
Symphony Orchestra, Ya-
niv Dinur began his con-
ducting career at the age
of 19 when he was invited
to perform with the Israel
Camerata Orchestra in Je-
rusalem, making him the
youngest conductor ever
invited to conduct an or-
chestra in Israel. Deemed
a “marvelous conductor”
by mentor Kurt Masur, Mr.
Dinur is also a passionate
lecturer and music educa-
tor and currently serves
as director of orchestral
activities at American
University in Washington
DC. Mr. Dinur considers
it his mission to bring col-
lege students to the con-
cert halls, and often meets
with students in universi-
ties around the world and
introduces them to classi-
cal music.
“Thanks to the Ama-
rillo Symphony’s national
reputation, we were able
to secure an astounding
conductor on short no-
tice,” said Susan White,
executive director of the
Amarillo Symphony.
“The audience is in for a
great treat as we prepare
for Intimate Evening with
this dynamic young con-
ductor.”
The campaign to in-
crease the accessibility of
the Amarillo Symphony
by decreasing ticket pric-
es continues this season
thanks to the generosity
of numerous visionaries
within the community.
Single tickets are avail-
able for $10, $25 or $40.
Season subscriptions are
still available and may be
secured by contacting the
Amarillo Symphony of-
fice at 806-376-8782.
Intimate Evening will
be held at the Globe-News
Center for the Performing
Arts on Friday, January 24
and Saturday, January 25
at 8:00 pm. For more in-
formation about Intimate
Evening or to purchase
tickets, please visit www.
amarillosymphony.org or
call 806-376-8782.
Amarillo Symphony
Announces Change to
Intimate Evening Concert
Yaniv Dinur to serve as guest conductor
Pictured: Dr. Leif Andersson. Courtesy photo.
BROWNWOOD – The
Texas 4-H Council is un-
dertaking a statewide grass-
roots effort to raise funds
for the 4-H Conference
Center near Brownwood,
according to center director
Dr. Darlene Locke.
The fundraising, which
began in January, concludes
June 12 — the fnal day of
the statewide Texas 4-H
Roundup.
“Not since the choco-
late candy bar sales of the
early 1970s has there been
a statewide effort for 4-H
members and families to
raise funds to support the
Texas 4-H Conference Cen-
ter,“ Locke said.
The fundraising effort,
named “4-H Where Change
Makes Cents,” is headed
by the Texas 4-H Council’s
service committee mem-
bers Christian Cole, Kad-
den Kothmann and Kaley
Yorgensen.
“These youths have or-
ganized a campaign that
will be easy for all to par-
ticipate in,” Locke said.
“Just get a jar and a cam-
paign label, then start col-
lecting loose change. Just
empty your pockets or look
at the bottom of your purse
or under your sofa cushions
to fnd that spare change to
put to use toward support-
ing the center.”
Locke said collection
jars can be obtained from
the nearest Texas 4-H Coun-
cil member or 4-H’ers may
use their own. Labels can
be obtained from a Texas
4-H Council member.
“Make sure to write
your name and district on
your jar and bring it to the
community service booth at
the Texas 4-H Roundup,”
she said. “Collection will
continue throughout the
roundup and will conclude
at noon on June 12, with in-
dividual and district winners
announced during the day’s
closing ceremonies. During
the roundup, there will be
a visual meter graphic for
each district that will be up-
dated every night.”
The immediate goal of
the campaign is to raise
funds to support the instal-
lation of two Gaga pits and
a nine-hole disc golf course
at the 4-H center.
“If you’re not famil-
iar with Gaga, it’s a fast-
paced form of dodgeball,”
Locke explained. “Both of
these activities will provide
countless hours of fun for
all persons visiting the 4-H
Center.”
The service commit-
tee will keep record of all
contributions and the 4-H
district making the most
contributions will be recog-
nized at Texas 4-H Round-
up with a pizza party. Also,
one individual from each
district will be recognized
with their photo on a tile in
the 4-H center’s “Wall of
Fame.”
Locke said the fund-
raiser will be similar to the
Texas Extension Educa-
tion Association’s annual
“Coins for Friendship” ef-
fort where club members
contribute loose change at
their monthly meetings.
“Annually, the group
presents the 4-H Center
with a check averaging
from $4,000 to $8,000,”
she said. “Since 1995, the
TEEA membership has
collected over $146,000 in
coins for the 4-H center.
These funds have been used
for ‘camperships,’ program
enhancements such as pur-
chasing kayaks, sailboats,
installing the cargo net on
the challenge course, dor-
mitory renovations, pur-
chase of kitchen appliances
and other equipment.”
With over 60,000 active
4-H club members in Tex-
as, the Texas 4-H Council,
the youth leadership board
representing all AgriLife
Extension service districts,
challenges 4-H member-
ship to support this fund-
raiser, said service commit-
tee members.
The Texas 4-H Con-
ference Center on Lake
Brownwood is a 78-acre
complex providing sum-
mer youth camps, weekend
leadership retreats, train-
ing opportunities and many
more programs and activi-
ties. The center serves as
a year-round conference
facility serving a variety of
educational, fraternal, reli-
gious and social groups.
Locke said donations
also can be made online
through the Texas 4-H
Foundation at http://texas-
4hfoundation.org/center-
support. The campaign is
one of the selections in the
“Specify Donation” drop-
down menu.
“Just be sure to make
note of the 4-H member
and/or district that you want
to receive credit toward the
prizes,” Locke said.
For more information,
contact Cole at christian-
cole2016@aol.com or
Locke at dlocke@ag.tamu.
edu.
Texas 4-H Council spearheading
fundraiser for Texas 4-H Conference Center
The Borger
News-Herald
Newspapers In
Education
Kids’ Page is
sponsored by:
Chevron-Phillips
Gold Sponsor
Morton Lumber
Ace Hardware
Traditions
Oil and Gas
If your business
or organization
would like to
sponsor this
important
program,
please contact
Stephanie Hooper,
Publisher,
by e-mail at
publisher@
borgernewsherald.
com or by calling
273-5611.
6
WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 22, 2014
Borger News- Herald
Kids Page
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
This is a good day to share
your hopes and dreams for the
future with others, because their
feedback could help you. Try it
and see what happens.
TAURUS (April 20 to May
20) For the next few weeks,
you look good to authority
fgures, because the Sun is at
the top of your chart, casting a
fattering light on you. Milk this
for all it’s worth!
GEMINI (May 21 to June
20)
Because you have a strong
desire to travel and seek
adventure, do something
different. Go someplace you’ve
never been before.
CANCER (June 21 to July
22)
You can clean up a lot of
loose details regarding shared
property, insurance matters,
inheritances, taxes and debt in
the next few weeks. Just roll up
your sleeves and dig in.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Remember to get more rest
now and for the next few weeks,
because the Sun is as far away
from you as it gets all year,
and the Sun is your source of
energy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Because your top priority in
the next few weeks is to be
better organized, give yourself
the right tools to do a bang-up
job. Get shelving, fle folders,
paint, cleaning supplies --
whatever.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Now and for the next few
weeks, your top priority is to be
yourself. You want to play and
express your creative talents
without anyone holding you
back.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov.
21) It’s appropriate for you
to focus on home, family and
your domestic needs in the next
few weeks. Discussions with a
parent could be signifcant.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) Just accept the
fact that your daily pace will
accelerate in the next few weeks
with short trips, errands and
increased reading and writing.
Busy you!
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to
Jan. 19) The next few weeks
are the perfect time to think
about cash fow, earnings, your
possessions and what it is you
truly value. Or to go one step
further -- what are your values?
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18) It’s fne to put your own
needs frst now, because this is
the only time all year when the
Sun is in your sign. It’s your
turn to be top dog.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) Work alone or behind the
scenes as you begin to strategize
about what you want your new
year (birthday to birthday) to
be all about. It’s a good time to
plan ahead.
WEDNESDAY
JANUARY 22, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Comics 7
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
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HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
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Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
Locally Owned & Operated
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
K

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MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
BORGER NEWS-HERALD service directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Heather or Kristie at 273-5611
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Discounts for single
parents & the elderly.
“Let’s Get Clean”
{BIODEGRADABLE PRODUCTS ONLY}
L
D
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Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
NEW BUSINESS NEW BUSINESS
WT Vapors
722 Weatherly
Borger • 806-274-8874
westtexasvapors@yahoo.com
OPENING FRIDAY
NOVEMBER 1ST
GRAND OPENING
NOVEMBER 2ND
10-2 PM
Tuesday-Friday 10-6
Saturday 9-3
Closed Sunday & Monday
All E-Cig Accessories
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
T
H
E
BO
D
Y
Shop
109 S. Main
Borger
806-274-3474
BODY SHOP
Breedlove’s
Auto FX
806-567-6967
Full Auto Detailing
319 Weatherly
AUTO DETAILING
TATTOOS CLEANING AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
J&D Remodeling
• Tile • Drywal
• Paint (Inside/Out)
• Wod Flor
Refinishing
& Much More..
Free Estimates Call
David at 806-275-0841
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
REMODELING CAREGIVERS
JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
R
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o
f
n
g
, C
o
n
c
r
e
te
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
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CONCRETE CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
$99.00 Security
Deposit
No Application Fee
Month of January
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
2 & 3 Bedrooms
Available!
806-273-2766
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
DEAR ABBY: I just read
the letter from “Twice Bitten in
Washington” (Nov. 4), who had
thanked veterans for their ser-
vice to our country and received
several negative responses. I’m
a retired vet, dying from Agent
Orange poisoning. I served two
tours in Vietnam, and when I re-
turned from Nam, I was called
a baby killer, spat upon and re-
fused taxi service because I was
in uniform.
America has had a change
in attitude since the Vietnam
War. Today, many folks appreci-
ate what the military is doing. I
have been thanked several times
while wearing my Vietnam Vet-
erans hat and it makes me feel
great, to the point my eyes wa-
ter.
Tell “Twice Bitten” to con-
tinue thanking the military vets.
It means a lot, especially to vets
like me. Sure beats being called
a baby killer. -- VIETNAM
VET
DEAR VIETNAM VET: I
received many letters like yours
from Vietnam vets who were
also not thanked for their service
when they returned home. Like
you, they very much appreci-
ate hearing a “delayed” thanks
for their service. I would like
to thank you and all the readers
who responded to that column
with such emotional and some-
times gut-wrenching stories.
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: I would like
to offer “Twice” an explanation
for the reaction she received. I
served two tours in Iraq and lost
some good friends. When vets
return home from war, home is
a scary place. The life we lived
and breathed is no longer. After
spending so much time fearing
the unknown and protecting
ourselves physically and emo-
tionally, we can’t stop.
Many of us came home feel-
ing guilty that we lived while
others died -- ashamed that we
might not have done enough,
that we should have been the
one who was laid to rest, that
maybe if we had looked harder,
fought harder, we wouldn’t have
lost a soldier.
When I returned home, I
reacted the way “Twice” de-
scribed. I was resentful that
someone would take the time to
honor me, but not the friends I
lost. It was a long time before
I realized that by honoring me
with their sincere thanks, they
were honoring every soldier
we have ever lost. Now when
I am thanked, I shake hands, I
hug, and I thank them for their
respect.
To “Twice”: Never stop! Do
not be afraid. We are not hate-
ful or angry. We are scared and
sad. Your expression of thanks
means more than any parade,
any medal or any award could
ever mean. -- BRANDON IN
INDIANA
DEAR ABBY: As a soon-
to-be-retired career Army off-
cer, I am one of those who feel
awkward when people thank us
for doing our jobs. The Army
was a career I chose, knowing
the hardships and what would
be asked of me. The military is
flled with all kinds of people,
and even though I may not al-
ways be in the mood for a strang-
er to approach me when I’m out
and about, deep down inside it
is refreshing to know that what
I do is appreciated. -- PHIL IN
WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR ABBY: One day
while walking in a cemetery, we
saw an elderly gentleman lean-
ing on the arm of his caregiver,
and we realized he was looking
at a veterans memorial. My wife
approached and asked if he was
a veteran. He looked at her and
said “Yes,” and she said, “Thank
you very much for your service
and your bravery.” He immedi-
ately teared up and croaked out
a “Thank you.” His caregiver
rolled her eyes.
My wife got into her face
and said, “You have a hero on
your arm, so show him some re-
spect!” The veteran cried hard-
er, grabbed my wife’s hand and
said, “No one has ever said that
to me, especially my caregiver.”
-- KIMIT IN THE MIDWEST
DEAR READERS: May
I suggest some other ways to
thank vets and those currently
in the military? Volunteer at
a veterans hospital and bring
fowers and toiletries. If you live
near a base, volunteer to support
the USO at your local airport to
make travel more comfortable
for our servicemen and women.
Donate to Wounded Warriors
or similar organizations, or the
Veterans of Foreign Wars or
Disabled American Veterans.
Dear Abby is written by Abi-
gail Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was found-
ed by her mother, Pauline Phil-
lips. Write Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
Abby shares more than 100
of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: “Abby’s Favorite
Recipes” and “More Favorite
Recipes by Dear Abby.” Send
your name and mailing address,
plus check or money order for
$14 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Shipping and handling are in-
cluded in the price.)
Vets deserve thanks even
when it seems unwelcome
Dear Abby
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
CA$H FOR cars/trucks:
Get A Top Dol l ar IN-
STANT Offer! Runni ng or
Not.. Damaged?
Wrecked? OK! We Pay Up
To $20,000! Call Toll Free:
1-800-871-8712
USED CARS/TRUCKS
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
FSBO!
610 BROWN IN Stinnett.
Starter home in good
shape.
2bdrm/1bath. Carpet
throughout, except in 1
bedroom and kitchen.
1,000sqft. 6ft wooden
fence. Paved Street, Cur-
bed, Gutter. On 3 Lots.
8 blocks from school!
Call (806)886-1150
420 OTHER CITIES PROP.
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
i n thi s newspaper i s sub-
j ect to the federal fai r
housi ng act of 1968
whi ch makes i t i l l egal to
adverti se “any prefer-
ence, l i mi tati on or di s-
cri mi nati on based on
race, col or, rel i gi on,
handi cap, fami l y status,
sex or nati onal ori gi n, or
an i ntenti on to make any
such preference, l i mi ta-
tion or discrimination.”
Thi s newspaper wi l l not
knowingly accept any ad-
verti si ng for real estate
which is in violation of the
l aw. Our readers are
hereby i nformed that al l
410 CITY PROPERTY
340 APART. RENTALS
208 N. RIDGELAND,
FRITCH, 3 br., 1 ba. 806-
665-4595 TruStar RE
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
118 W.OCLA.
3BDRM/1BATH-REMOD-
ELED. SPRINKLER Sys-
tem, New Appl i ances,
Fenced Yard.
(806)273-3982
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
LOOKIG TO buy Junk Ve-
hi cl es w/Ti tl es. Wi l l Pay
Cash. (806)886-0005
290 MISC. WANTED
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FROM HOME. 6-8 weeks.
ACCREDITED. Get a Di -
pl oma. Get a Job! No
Computer Needed. FREE
Brochure. 1-800-264-8330.
Benj ami n Frankl i n Hi gh
School www.di pl omafrom-
home.com
130 EDUCATIONAL
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
i ng, anythi ng you want
done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
110 WORK WANTED
DO YOU need a steady
j ob? Looki ng for: machi -
ni sts, heavy equi pment
mechani cs and fi el d wel d-
ers. We offer hol i day pay,
heal th i nsurance and va-
cati on. Appl y at PAYTON
MACHINE & SUPPLY at
3100 S. Cedar Street, 8-
12/1-5 M-F.
090 HELP WANTED
DISH TV Retai l er. Starti ng
at $19.99/month (for 12
mos.) Broadband Internet
starti ng $14.95/month
(where avai l abl e). Ask
about SAME DAY Instal l a-
ti on! CALL Now! 1-800-
593-2572
010 SPECIAL
Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main St.
Borger, TX 79007
806-273-5611
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Place a classified for help want-
ed, work wanted, garage sales,
houses for sale/rent, appliances
for sale, and more with the
Borger News-Herald!
DAKE’S
RESTAURANT
& LOTS
Main St. - Borger
Call REC
806-273-5557
CENTRAL STATION
APARTMENTS
700 S. MCGEE
Now Available To Rent!!
806-273-5557
I am looking for...
A professional person to represent Farm Bureau
Insurance Companies in Hutchinson County.
The person I seek is most likely currently
employed but experienced job dissatisfaction and
is ready to take control of their career.
The position I have available offers:
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Send your resume to: mcook@txfb-ins.com
Mature part-time
Nursery Worker
needed.
Please call
Lynn at
683-7929
B&L Body Shop is
looking for an
EXPERIENCED
PAINTER
Apply in person 400
S. Harvey, Borger.
In Borger! Texas
St. Apartments.
2 bed., 1 bath.
Available Now!
806-341-7170
DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
The Plemons Stinnett Phillips CISD is
accepting applications for
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS.
Applicants must have or be able to
obtain a Class B CDL, attend a 20 hour
certification class, pass Drug and Alcohol
testing, and pass an annual physical.
Applications may be obtained at the
school district central office at 603 Main
Street in Stinnett Texas, or on the school’s
website:www.pspcisd.net Position to be
filled as soon as possible.
Contact Greg Drennan,
Maint./Trans Director @ 886-2572 for
more information. PSPCISD is an equal
opportunity employer.
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
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Therapist Tech V - $11.63/hr -
ASCI Borger
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Therapist Tech I - $9.07/hr – Group Home
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COOK
For meal prep. Prefer
experienced individual,
but will train qualified
applicant to prepare
meals for special diets.
Must be reliable &
dependable. EOE/MFHV.
Apply in person, BORGER
HEALTH CARE CENTER,
1316 South Florida,
Borger, TX 79007
Full Time CDL-A-X Crude Oil
Transport Drivers Needed
Pampa, Perryton, Borger,
Wheeler, Canadian
Local Hauling-Home Daily, Weekly Paycheck
Paid Orientation/Training, Vacation,
401K, Life, Medical, Dental, Vision
Minimum of 12 months T/T or
Tanker experience required
Call Lori Hernandez 800/737-9981
or visit us online at www.MIPE.com
TAX SERVICE
Glenda
Brownlee
628 Whittenburg
274-2142
Borger News- Herald
Sports
10
WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 22, 2014
Phillips Golf Course
1609Sterling•Borger•806-274-6812
10
%
Discount On
Memberships
DAILY
Specials
$
25.
00
Cart & Green Fees
This young man is Samuel
Newman. He lives in Ama-
rillo, but he does have family
and friends here in Borger.
Samuel is a wrestler for
the West Amarillo Rhinos
wresting team. He has re-
cently competed in two na-
tional wrestling tournaments.
One was in El Paso and the
other was in Houston.
There were kids from all
over the United States com-
peting in these tournaments.
And I don’t know how the
other kids did, but Samuel
placed SECOND in both Na-
tional tournaments!! I have
a feeling that we are going to
be hearing a lot more about
this young man.
Way to go Samuel !
West Amarillo Rhinos
Deanna Bejarano-
Sports Reporter
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
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KALISPELL, Mont. (AP) — Whitefsh native Maggie Voisin is set to make Winter Olym-
pic history in a couple of ways.
The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association nominated the 15-year-old on Tuesday as a mem-
ber of the 2014 U.S. Olympic team to compete in slopestyle skiing in Sochi, Russia.
Slopestyle skiing is making its Olympic debut this year and Voisin, who turned 15 on Dec.
14, would be the youngest athlete on the U.S. team.
In slopestyle skiing, athletes ski downhill with various obstacles and jumps on which they
do tricks that are scored based on diffculty and execution. The women’s ski slopestyle event
is scheduled for Feb. 11.
The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association also nominated moguls skiers Bradley Wilson of
Butte and Heather McPhie of Bozeman to the Olympic team. Wilson will be competing in his
frst Olympics, while McPhie competed in 2010. Wilson’s older brother, Bryon, won a bronze
medal in moguls at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia.
The U.S. Olympic Committee will formally name the 2014 U.S. Olympic Team on Jan.
27. Voisin is in Aspen, Colo. this week preparing to compete in the Winter X Games this
weekend.
Whitefsh skier nominated to
US Olympic team
SE Louisiana names Riser
baseball coach
HAMMOND, La. (AP)
— Southeastern Louisiana
University athletics director
Jay Artigues says interim
baseball coach Matt Riser
has been given the job on a
permanent basis.
The 30-year-old Riser
had been promoted from as-
sistant to interim head coach
last June, when Artigues re-
linquished head coach du-
ties to take over the athletic
department.
Riser played college base-
ball at Tulane and was on
the 2005 Tulane team that
reached the College World
Series. Before that he played
under Artigues at Pearl River
Community College.
In 2008, two years after
Artigues had taken over at
Southeastern, Riser joined
the Lions as a volunteer as-
sistant.
Riser, a Picayune, Miss.,
native, has since coached
seven players who’ve been
selected in Major League
Baseball drafts.
He says getting South-
eastern’s head coaching job
is a “dream come true.”
Walker gets to play with Woods,
this time longer
San Diego (AP) — Jimmy
Walker is playing the open-
ing two rounds of the Farm-
ers Insurance Open with Ti-
ger Woods. That will be 35
more holes than the frst time
they played together.
Walker was a senior at
Baylor when he used his par-
ents’ credit card — against
their wishes because it was
during fnals — to go through
Monday qualifying for the
Byron Nelson Champion-
ship. He got in the feld and
after taking one fnal exam,
ran up to Dallas for a practice
round at Cottonwood Valley
using a local caddie.
“All of a sudden, Tiger
is over on the front nine and
my guys is like, ‘Hey, there’s
Tiger over there,’” Walker
said. This was 2001. It was
Woods’ frst tournament
since he won the Masters for
his fourth straight major.
“So he pretty much was
owning everybody,” Walker
said. Woods skipped over
to the par 5 that Walker was
playing, so Walker picked
up his ball and headed to the
next tee. Woods picked up
his ball and headed to the
same tee. “He’s like, ‘Can I
play through you? I’m try-
ing to play real fast and get
a couple of holes in?’ I said,
‘Dude, you can do whatever
you want,’” Walker recalled.
So this was the one hole
they played together, and it
was memorable for Walker
for one reason.
“I am literally shaking,”
he said. “I have every bad-
swing thought possible —
don’t shank it, top it, all that
stuff. I make contact. I look
up and it’s heading right at
it. Can’t see it because it’s
kind of in the setting sun. We
walked down there and he
asked what’s going on, I told
him I Monday qualifed. We
talked and it was really cool
and he was really nice. We
get down there and his ball
is about 15 feet away and
mine’s about 6 feet away.”
Woods picked up his ball
and was on his way. But there
was a lesson for Walker. “I
can remember thinking,
‘Man, if I was that nervous
and I hit that good of a shot, I
guarantee I will never be that
nervous again my entire life
— ever,’” Walker said.
He recalls narrowly miss-
ing the cut. And then he qual-
ifed for his frst U.S. Open
at Southern Hills. Walker
played a practice round that
week with Nick Faldo. No
big deal. “It was so easy
compared to that one shot,”
he said. So when his wife
sent him a text Tuesday that
he was playing with Woods
and Jordan Spieth, Walker
offered a predictable re-
sponse: “Sounds fun.”
Westwood on Board:
Lee Westwood feels he is
settled in to his new life liv-
ing in Florida and playing
a majority of his events in
America.
And on Tuesday, he
had his frst meeting as a
member of the PGA Tour’s
Player Advisory Council.
Westwood was among four
players who were selected
by the players serving on
the policy board.
“I don’t know what
they’re expecting,” he said.
“I don’t know what to ex-
pect. I think I’ll just sit there
for a while and listen. Obvi-
ously, 20 years on the tour,
I’ve seen a few things, so I
might be able to comment a
little bit.”
Westwood, with 38
wins worldwide and a No.
1 ranking, never served on
the tournament commit-
tee in all his years on the
European Tour. He said he
would have served on the
committee, but he was nev-
er asked.
“I don’t think I’m con-
troversial or anything like
that, but occasionally sen-
sible,” he said. “Occasion-
ally, I have a good idea.”
Royals reach deal with Maxwell,
avoid arbitration
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
(AP) — Outfelder Justin
Maxwell and the Kansas
City Royals agreed to a
one-year contract worth
$1,325,000, leaving closer
Greg Holland and reliever
Aaron Crow as their only
unsigned players in arbitra-
tion.
Maxwell gets a substan-
tial raise from the $492,500
he made last year. He was
asking for $1.7 million
and the Royals had offered
$1,075,000.
Kansas City previously
agreed to one-year con-
tracts with frst baseman
Eric Hosmer, infelder
Emilio Bonifacio, catcher
Brett Hayes and relief pitch-
ers Tim Collins and Luke
Hochevar.
Holland, coming off his
frst All-Star appearance,
asked for $5.2 million and
the Royals offered $4.1 mil-
lion. He made $539,000 last
year, when he was 2-1 with
a 1.21 ERA and 47 saves.
Crow asked for $1.7 mil-
lion. The Royals offered the
same $1.28 million he made
Columbus, Ohio (AP) —
R.J. Umberger scored twice
to lead the Columbus Blue
Jackets to their franchise-
record seventh straight win,
a 5-3 victory Tuesday night
over the Los Angeles Kings.
Nathan Horton scored in his
600th NHL game, Artem Ani-
simov had a goal and an as-
sist and Ryan Johansen also
scored for Columbus, with
James Wisniewski picking up
two assists. Sergei Bobrovsky
moved to 8-0 in his past eight
starts with 26 saves.
Jeff Carter, Dwight King
and Robyn Regehr had goals
for the Kings, who have lost
three in a row. Mike Richards
had two assists. The Blue Jack-
ets have been surging since
getting Horton, who missed
the frst 40 games after shoul-
der surgery, and Bobrovsky,
who sat out most of Decem-
ber with a strained groin, back
on the ice. They’re 8-1-0 with
Horton, a big free-agent sign-
ing last summer from Boston,
in the lineup. Down 2-1 after
the frst, the Kings tied it be-
fore the Blue Jackets scored
twice in 89 seconds late in
the second to take command.
Carter, booed loudly every
time he touched the puck, re-
ceived a nice pass on a 3 on
1 break from Richards and re-
corded his 20th goal at 8:39.
Carter, who played an un-
happy 39 games with the Blue
Jackets in 2011-12 before be-
ing dealt to the Kings for de-
fenseman Jack Johnson and
a frst-round pick, has goals
in his past four games. Each
team came close to picking up
goals before Columbus erupt-
ed in the fnal 2 minutes of the
second. Umberger shadowed
defenseman Drew Doughty
and stole the puck from him
along the short boards, then
put up what appeared to be
an innocent shot from a hard
angle. But Martin Jones, mak-
ing his frst start since Jan. 2,
struggled picking it up and the
puck caromed off his glove
and into the net with 1:45 left
in the period.
The Blue Jackets still
weren’t done, however. Ani-
simov won a puck battle in the
neutral zone and then carried
the puck down the left wing.
On a rush, he sent a tape-to-
tape lead pass to Horton who
lifted the puck high for his
third of the season with just
15.6 seconds left for a 4-2
lead. The Blue Jackets had
killed off three frst-period
penalties and escaped the frst
20 minutes with a 2-1 lead af-
ter falling behind early.
The Kings scored at the
2:42 mark when Trevor
Lewis’ shot from the right
dot went off Bobrovsky’s
right leg pad to King, who
was charging the net through
the high slot. He had an al-
most empty net for his 11th
of the season. Columbus
pulled even on the power
play, where it has been par-
ticularly effective of late —
scoring on 6 of its past 13
attempts with a man advan-
tage. After defenseman Jake
Muzzin went to the box for
tripping, the Blue Jackets
tied it when Wisniewski’s
hard slap shot from the top
of the left circle was redi-
rected in the crease by Um-
berger at 12:47. It was his
12th of the season and his
114th as a Blue Jacket, mov-
ing him past David Vyborny
into sole possession of sec-
ond place in franchise histo-
ry behind Rick Nash (289).
Then, in the fnal minute of
the period, Johansen took a
seeing-eye stretch pass from
rookie Ryan Murray and
glided past a defenseman to
go high with a forehand to
beat Jones. It was Johans-
en’s 19th goal of the season.
Umberger’s 2 goals lift CBJ past Kings, 5-3
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