Skip to main content

Wednesday February 26, 2014

Unpublished

February 26, 2014

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Alexandria
Rodriguez
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
Your Local Weather
Tue
2/25
41/19
Considerable
clouds early.
Some de-
crease in
clouds later
in the day.
Wed
2/26
50/30
Plenty of sun.
Highs in the
low 50s and
lows in the
low 30s.
Thu
2/27
68/38
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
upper 60s
and lows in
the upper
30s.
Fri
2/28
60/28
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
upper 20s.
Sat
3/1
52/32
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
low 50s and
lows in the
low 30s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
“... all Texans recognize that
we can and should do a bet-
ter job of educating students
in Texas...”
-Greg Abbott
Stay
informed
of local news, weather,
sports, and other fun
and interesting events
around
Hutchinson County at
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Sports
Kids’ Page
Comics
Service Directory
Classifeds
Community
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Greg Abbot stops to
campaign in Amarillo
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
Like us on Facebook for breaking
news and the latest sports scores!
Don’t
Miss
Wednesday Kid’s Page
Inside!
Wanda Guinn
Submitted
The Altrusa Flea Mar-
ket/Craft Show will begin at
9:00 a.m. Saturday morning,
with closing time 6:00 p.m.
Sunday hours are from 10:00
a.m to 4:00 p.m. Approxi-
mately 80 spaces are avail-
able at the dome on Bulldog
Avenue, and they will all be
flled. Many vendors buy
more than one space. The
shopper will fnd gifts for all
ages, a variety of jewelry, an-
tiques, collectables, crochet,
afghans, scarves and many
other items too varied and
numerous to name.
Altrusa Club members
will be preparing food for
the Concession. They will
have beans and cornbread,
barbecue sandwiches, hot
dogs, and plenty of snacks.
Pies, brownies, cookies and
other desserts will satisfy the
sweet tooth.
Funds from this show go
to help various organizations
in Hutchinson County. Each
semester Altrusa sponsors
a student at Frank Phillips
with a tuition scholarship.
At Christmas time, school
counselors help select needy
teenagers and Altrusans take
them shopping, usually for,
but not limited to, clothing.
Altrusa’s projects vary
from funding organizations,
to bringing cheer to senior
citizens, to personal hygiene
products for students, and
care packages to meals-on-
wheels recipients during
their birthday month, just to
brighten their day. Altrusa
has been caring for needs of
less fortunate in Hutchinson
County since 1957, and still
going strong. The three fea
markets they sponsor each
year provide the funds for
their projects. When you pa-
tronize the fea market, you
are having a part in Altrusa’s
projects. Altrusa invite you
to come have lunch and shop
around.
Altrusa Craf Show coming to Borger
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 49, 10 Pages
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
Greg Abbott, Texas Attor-
ney General and candidate for
Governor, stopped in Ama-
rillo Tuesday afternoon to ad-
dress reporters and supporters
at Cafe Marizon.
Abbott stressed the impor-
tance of voting, noting that the
Texas panhandle is home to
some of the strongest Repub-
lican districts in the country
and telling supporters, “You
all know that Randall and
Potter Counties are going to
go strongly Republican,” but
warned, “what you need to
know at the same time is that
Barack Obama’s ‘Turn Texas
Blue’ campaign team ... are
going to be operating across
the entire state of Texas. ... we
all have to be concerned about
their effort to turn Texas blue
because if we lose Texas, we
lose the United States.”
Abbott told jokes, poked
fun at some attendees, and
spent time speaking about
his wife Cecilia, drawing a
contrast between her and his
likely opponent in the Gover-
nor’s race, Democrat Wendy
Davis. He told the crowd
about the accident that put
him in a wheelchair and his
wife’s continued dedication
to their marriage through the
ordeal; a possible shot at his
divorcée opponent.
Speaking of his time as
Attorney General, a position
for which he will not seek re-
election as he focuses on the
race for the Governor’s man-
sion, Abbott told supporters
that a record 28 billion dollars
in child support is now being
collected by the Offce. He
also mentioned fling “count-
less lawsuits” challenging the
national government, Presi-
dent and US Attorney Gen-
eral Holder. Abbot spoke of
the need for “a stiff spine to
fght back against an unprec-
edented overreaching Barack
Obama federal government
administration that’s trying to
crush jobs here in the State of
Texas.”
Abbott, also talked about
the necessity of protecting
the rights of citizens “such
as your Second Amendment
right to keep and bear arms.”
Abbott’s offce has won two
cases recently that protected
gun owner’s rights in Texas.
Abbott has recently been
criticized in the media by
Democratic groups and by
Wendy Davis for his associa-
tion with musician Ted Nu-
gent.
Nugent, who Davis and
others have labelled a preda-
tor after admissions of sex-
ual relations with underage
girls, has called Greg Abbott
his “blood brother” and last
month called President Ba-
rack Obama a “subhuman
mongrel”; an insult he insists
was not racially motivated
and later apologized for.
Abbott did not comment
on his relationship with Nu-
gent.
In short interview with
News-Herald reporters, Ab-
bott supported Texas’ recent
decision to drop Algebra II
requirements for high school
students saying, “I am now
running for Governor. I have
been Attorney General lon-
ger than anybody else in the
history of the state. I was a
Justice of the Supreme Court
in the state of Texas. I was
a Judge. Before that I was a
lawyer after graduating from
law school. Not once in my
entire life have I had a use for
Algebra II.”
Texas Attorney General and candidate for Governor Greg Abbott addresses the crowd at Cafe Marizon in Amarillo Tuesday afternoon. - Photo by JC Cortez
JC Cortez
Editor
editor@borgernewsherald.com
Robin Stroud, Mary Jane Brink, and Stella Sauls will be working the concession, ready to fll your orders. - Photo courtesy of Wanda Guinn
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2
Obituaries
Local Weather
It will be warmer today, but only by a little as highs warm into the
mid 40s to lower 50s by late day. Winds will settle way down by sunrise
on Wednesday and generally stay light and variable throughout the day.
Skies will be mostly cloudy during the morning hours, then become partly
cloudy by the afternoon.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Brian James
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
SHERIFF OFFICE REPORT
2-21-14 Charles Beagle was served bond surrender warrant #10994 for unau-
thorized use of vehicle while in custody at Hutchinson County Jail.
2-24-14 Deputies assisted Fritch Police Department with an arrest from a
traffc stop.
2-24-14 Deputies were dispatched to Hwy 136 and Deahl Rd reference a reck-
less driver, but did not locate the vehicle.
Shannon Marc Sherwood, 41, passed away
in Borger, on Monday, February 24, 2014. Services will be at
2:00 p.m., Thursday at Minton Memorial Chapel. The family
will receive guests from 5-7 p.m., Wednesday, February 26, at
the funeral home.
Shannon was born on July 27, 1972, in Pampa, TX to Danny
and Rhonda Sherwood. He was a former roughneck in the oil
and gas industry. Shannon married Kendra Ford on February
14, 1990 in Borger. He loved to write and make things, and
he loved his kids and grandkids.
Shannon is survived by his wife, Kendra, son, Cody Sherwood, and daughter, Taylor Sher-
wood all of Borger; father, Danny Sherwood of Nebraska; mother, Rhonda Webb of Borger;
sister, Shilo Phillips of Stinnett; grandchildren, Laigan, Kelby and Dakota.
Clint Manning 36, of Amarillo, passed away, Sun-
day, February 23, 2014.
Clint was born August 15, 1977 Borger to Walter McDon-
ald .and Peggy Sue (Wellesley) Manning. He was a member
of the First Southern Baptist Church and was a welder in the
petroleum industry.
Mr. Manning is preceded in death by his maternal grandpar-
ents R.L. and Barbara Harris and maternal grandmother Pat
Wellesley, paternal granddad Walter (Pappy Pete) Manning.
Survivors include two children Alicia and Canaan Manning both of Borger; his parents
Walter (Donny) and Peggy Manning of Fritch: a sister and brother-in-law Bree and Wesley
Jameson of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Also great grandfather Charlie Wellesley of Stinnett;
great grandmother Odessa Rea of Lyons, Kansas and fve nieces and nephews, Poetry, Au-
tumn, Wesley, Journey, and Willow Jameson all of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Visitation will be from 8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. Wednesday February 26 and 8:00 A.M -5:00
P.M. Thursday February 27, 2014 in Fritch.
Funeral services will be held at 10:00 A.M. Friday, February 28, 2014, at First Southern
Baptist Church with Reverend Mark England offciating. Burial will follow in Stinnett Cem-
etery.
Send personal condolences to www.brownfuneraldirector.com
HUTCHINSON COUNTY
PRECINCTS AND POLLING PLACES
ELECTION DAY
March 4, 2014
7:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Precinct 11 Faith Covenant Church 1501 S. Florida – Borger, TX
Precinct 14 Fairlanes Baptist Church 3000 Fairlanes Blvd. - Borger, TX
Precinct 21 Fritch School Adm. Bldg. 540 Eagle Blvd. - Fritch, TX
Precinct 23 St. Andrews Methodist Church 100 Amaryllis, Borger, TX
Precinct 31 WTHS Commons Room 600 Stewart Ave. - Stinnett, TX
Precinct 33 Frank Phillips College TRIO/ 1301 W. Roosevelt St., Borger, TX
College Advancement Bldg.
Precinct 41 Holt Community Bldg. 11911 Co. Rd. 22, Spearman, TX
Precinct 42 Borger School Adm. Bldg. 200 E. 9
th
St. – Borger, TX
………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
EARLY VOTING: February 18, 2014 through February 28, 2014
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Hutchinson County Courthouse 500 Main St., Basement, Stinnett, TX
Hutchinson County Annex 1400 Veta St., Room 111, Borger, TX
Fritch Library Community Room 205 N. Cornell, Fritch, TX
Early voting polling places
open through February 28
Note: A sample ballot for all races will be posted
in the Weekend, March 1&2 edition of the Borger
News-Herald in time for Election Day, March 4!
The Hutchinson County
United Way of Day of Car-
ing will held on April 26,
2014.
Day of Caring is a day
when volunteers choose to
give their time and services
to work on a one-time ser-
vice project in an effort to
impact our community’s
needs with tasks that they
are unable to perform
themselves. Projects are
dependent upon the man-
power available.
If you or someone you
know is elderly or disabled
and in need of help with
minor home improvement
projects, such as:
Home Repairs
Gutters Cleaned
Winterizing Home For
Elderly or Disabled
Small Painting Project
Yard Clean Up
House Keeping
Carpentry & Odd Jobs
All jobs will be limited
to four hours of work.
Jobs are limited, the fol-
lowing types of work will
not be approved:
Work requiring permits
Bathroom remodeling
Large Paint Jobs
Roofng
Gas lines
Electrical
Plumbing
Tree Trimming
Minor Fence Repair
Only
Work on rental prop-
erty
If you would like to
submit a project, please
call (806) 274-9424.
before the March 17,
2014 deadline. Call early,
only 30 job requests are
being taken.
United Way accepting
submissions for Day of Caring
a
O
O
L
a
L
a
D
a
y
s
 March 10-12th, 2014, 10:00-2:00 p.m.
 Hutchinson County Library-Borger (in the Club Room)
 $15 for 4-H members, $25 for non-members (ages 3rd-12th grade)
 RSVP to the Extension Office by March 5th, 2014 878-4026 (there are
25 spots, so RSVP soon!)
 Monday: Crafty Sewing-Bring a t-shirt
 Tuesday: Arts & Crafts
 Wednesday: Fun Day!
 Snacks provided each day, bring your own lunch & drink
Extension programs serve people of all ages regardless of socio-
economic level, race, color, sex, religion, disability or natonal
origin.
The Texas A&M University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperatng.
Save the date on your
calendar for Friday, April
11, for the annual Coun-
ty-wide Health Fair. The
Health Fair will be held
on the Frank Phillips Col-
lege Campus in the Borger
Community Activity Cen-
ter. A move is being made
in the location to allow
more space for increased
information and screenings
to be presented. The hours
for this year’s Health Fair
will start at 8:30 a.m. with
fasting blood draws and
the remainder of the ex-
hibits open from 9:00 a.m.
until 2:30 p.m. The Health
Fair provides an opportu-
nity to gain, not only free
health and wellness infor-
mation, but to participate
in free health screenings.
An added feature to the
Health Fair this year will
be a number of outside ex-
hibits including Electrical
Safety, Teens in the Driver
Seat, Drunk Driving Simu-
lation, and Child Car Seat
Restraint Safety Checks.
The committee includ-
ing Golden Plains Com-
munity Hospital, Frank
Phillips College, Borger
Police Department, Borger
Chamber of Commerce
and Texas Agri Life Exten-
sion Service – Hutchinson
County, has worked to
bring information to reach
all age groups with exhib-
its and demonstrations and
information.
Of special interest for
families with infants or
young children will be the
Car Seat Restraint Safety
Checks. Appointments
must be made in advance
for this service at the Health
Fair. Call the County Ex-
tension Offce at 878-4026
to book your time for this
service.
Watch for more infor-
mation over the coming
weeks with specifcs on
others who will be featuring
information and screening
s to help insure a healthier
Hutchinson County.
Save the date for the upcoming
Hutchinson County Health Fair
February 28
Laurie McAfee from the Area
Agency on Aging in Amarillo
will be presenting an educa-
tional seminar on Medicare
Fraud and Abuse. 10 a.m.,
GPCH Board Room
March 1-2
Altrusa Club will hold its
Craft Show at the Aluminum
Dome Saturday and Sunday.
The show will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. on
Saturday and from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday.
Admission is free. Vendors
from over the area will fll
the Dome. The concession
stand will be open the entire
time with delicious snacks
available. Proceeds go to sup-
port charitable causes in the
Hutchinson County.
March 6
Hutchinson County
Republican Women’s meet-
ing. Frank Phillips College
Gallery Room, 12 noon.
Speaker: Borger City Council-
woman Brandy Callahan will
speak on the Borger Youth
Advisory Council and more.
Call 273-8363 or
274-6903 for more informa-
tion
March 7
Knights of Columbus #3558
6th Annual Fish Fry
5 pm-7:30 pm
St. John’s School Gym
Adv. tickets: $8 or 3 for $20
At the door: $ 9
Children: 0-5 for free.
6-11 for $5
Call Jim at 898-5126 or Steve
at 886-8769
March 10-12
Texas Agrilife Extension pres-
ents Ooh La La Days!
10 am-2 pm in the Club Room
of the Hutchinson County
Library in Borger. $15 for 4-H
members, $25 for non-mem-
bers (ages 3rd-12th grade).
RSVP to the Extension Offce
by March 5th, 2014 878-4026
(there are 25 spots, so RSVP
soon!
Monday: Crafty Sewing -
Bring a t-shirt
Tuesday: Arts & Crafts
Wednesday: Fun Day! Snacks
provided each day, bring your
own lunch & drink
March 14
The Red Hat Mamas will
meet at 11:30 a.m. at Lorene’s
Mexican Kitchen
Door prizes will be awarded.
Ladies, wear green for St.
Patrick’s Day!
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, Borger. Call 273-
5621 or 857-3947 for more
information.
Borger Football Booster Club,
7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian Church,
200 S. Bryan, 6 p.m. Call 806-
382-2449 or 806-273-6017 for
more information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930 Il-
linois. Call 274-2194 for more
information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of preschool-
ers international, meets at
First Baptist Church Borger
Fellowship Hall 9:30 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. child care is pro-
vided. Call FBC 263-5621
for information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medical
Field Employees in Hutchin-
son County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College Cafete-
ria in the Gallery Room For
more information call Aileen
Jackson at 274-9890or Betty
Jordon at 857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyte-
rian Church, 418 W. Coolidge,
8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more infor-
mation.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American Red
Cross, 614 Weatherly, 7:30
p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, second
foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6 p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you write
poetry and want to connect
with other poets to connect
with other poets, read and get
positive feedback we would
like to form a lunch group
and/or an evening group. If
interested please call Mary
Zan at 857-3670 for more
information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation every
Tuesday in the lobby 8:30am,
900 College Ave.
AANA support group for life
challenges, 6:30 p.m., That
One Place Community Center,
212 E. Broadway, Fritch. Call
275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Temporar-
ily held in Plainsmen Room at
FPC Cafeteria Call 274-3321
for more information.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9 a.m.
Call 886-0299 for more infor-
mation.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stinnett
Senior Citizen Building, 6:30
p.m. Call 878-2960 or 878-
3272 for more information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Ministry,
7 p.m. Call 857-3975 for
location.
Alibates Creek Indian Danc-
ers, 7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran
Church, 212 W. Jefferson.
Call 274-3239 for more infor-
mation.
VFW Post #1789 meets at the
VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room, 1 p.m. Call 467-5732
for more information.
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings, Op-
portunities Center, 11 a.m. to
noon.
4-H Club River Breaks Shoot-
ing Sports, Borger Chamber
of Commerce, 6:30 p.m. Call
806-878-4026.
Vietnam Veterans of America
Chapter 404, 403 S Cornell in
Fritch, 5:30 p.m. dinner and
6:00 meetings. Call 857-3950
for more information.
Accolade Home Care, no-cost
health screenings, 10 a.m. to
noon, County Courthouse.
Call 665-9700 for more infor-
mation.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure screen-
ings, MAL’S Café, Stinnett, 8
a.m. to 9 a.m.
Phillips Alumni Association,
Frank Phillips College Gallery
Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post 0671
meets at 7:30 pm at the
American Legion post next to
the Aluminum Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial Fel-
lowship, 8 a.m., Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art 10:30-
12 St. Andrews United Meth-
odist Church ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s welcome,
Doors open 5 pm, Cards sold
starting at 6 p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm, $14
each packet of 13 games or 6
papers for each of 13 games,
Additional papers half packets
for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more infor-
mation.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge, 7:30
p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost Chil-
dren Grief Support Group,
New U on Main Street, 7 p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more infor-
mation.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Second Thursdays
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen Sunshine
Club, 12 noon for lunch fol-
lowed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7 p.m.,
305 N. Deahl. Call 273-7127
or see fellowshipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings, Fritch
Sunshine Club, 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Mennonite
Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business meet-
ing, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and blood
sugar screenings, United Su-
permarket, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class, 10
a.m., Golden Plains Com-
munity Hospital Board Room.
Call 467-5718 or 467-5857
for more information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Call 878-2597 for more
information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor Home
Owners Assoc., 10 a.m., Club
House.
Marine Corps League Haw-
thorne Det. #1349, 9 a.m., 421
E. Broadway, Stinnett.
Young adults Christian mar-
riage class, Word of Life
Church, 9:45 a.m.Sundays,
Wednesdays, Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcotics
Anonymous, Valley Drive
west entrance, Cedar Street,
7:30 p.m. Call 806-570-2028
or 857-4038 for more infor-
mation
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014 Borger News- Herald
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
Ultimate Firming
Neck Cream
Recipe of the Day
The chill of the season heralds many chang-
es, including your appetite for heartier foods.
This is the perfect time to break out the casse-
role dishes and whip up your family’s favorite
comfort foods. Americans seem to agree that
when it comes to comfort classics, macaroni
and cheese is what they crave.
In fact, according to mymacaroniand-
cheese.info, in any given 12-week period, ap-
proximately one-third of the population of the
United States will eat macaroni and cheese at
least once, that’s almost 105 million people.
Mac and cheese is always in style and has
inspired countless websites, books and even a
song or two. The beauty of this menu standard
is how easy it is to dress up or down - depend-
ing on your culinary preference (or ingredients
you have handy). In fact, Laura Werlin, cheese
expert and James Beard award-winning au-
thor, offers up 50 ways to customize mac and
cheese in her new cookbook, “Mac & Cheese,
Please!”
“Throughout the years, macaroni and
cheese has been a staple at dinner tables,” says
Werlin. “Being from California, I love that
California’s cow’s milk cheesemakers make
over 250 styles of California cheeses. This va-
riety leads to endless possibilities and oppor-
tunities for creating unique, memorable and
delicious renditions.”
California Smokey Mac And Cheese
Three Ways
Smoked Mozzarella cheese and sun-dried
tomatoes take macaroni and cheese to a whole
new level. Serve as is, or turn this recipe into
soup or a bite-sized appetizer.
- 3 & 1/2 tablespoons California butter, di-
vided
- 2 tablespoons four
- 1 & 1/3 cups California milk
- 1 teaspoon spicy brown mustard
- 3/4 teaspoon garlic salt
- 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
- 1 & 1/4 cups shredded sharp California
Cheddar cheese, divided
- 3/4 cup shredded smoked California
Mozzarella cheese
- 1/2 cup white or wheat small elbow mac-
aroni, cooked according to package directions
and well drained
- 1/4 cup minced smoked sun-dried toma-
toes
- Freshly ground pepper to taste
- 3 tablespoons panko bread crumbs
Directions: Preheat oven to 400 F and light-
ly butter four individual baking dishes with 1/2
tablespoon butter. Melt remaining butter over
medium heat in a large saucepan. Add four
and cook for two minutes stirring constantly.
Whisk in milk and bring to a simmer, stirring
frequently; stir in mustard, salt and basil. Add
one cup Cheddar cheese and the Mozzarella
cheese a little at a time, cooking and stirring
until melted; stir in cooked macaroni and to-
matoes and cook for 5 minutes more. Pour into
prepared dishes. Stir together bread crumbs
and remaining cheese and sprinkle over top.
Cook for 10 minutes or lightly browned and
bubbly on top.
Makes four servings
Small Bite Appetizer Mac and Cheese
Cup Variation:
Press 24 wonton wrappers into 24 lightly
greased mini muffn cups, pressing frmly so
that the cups are fat on the bottom. Spoon
macaroni mixture into wonton cups. Sprinkle
with breadcrumb mixture and bake for 10 min-
utes, tenting with foil after fve minutes.
Makes eight appetizer servings
Mac and Cheese Soup Variation:
Melt one tablespoon butter in a large sauce-
pan over medium heat. Add 1/2 cup each: 1/4-
inch diced onion, celery and carrots and cook
for 10 minutes. Add two cups vegetable or
chicken broth and cook for 10 minutes more.
Stir into prepared macaroni and cheese and
cook until very hot. Sprinkle each serving with
breadcrumb mixture, if desired.
Makes four servings
One mac and cheese recipe served 3
ways makes for ultimate comfort food
3
Do YOU have a recipe that you’d like to see
featured in our “Recipe of the Day” section?
Drop your submissions by the Borger News
Herald at 2nd and Main, or e-mail them to
feature@borgernewsherald.com
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Are you interested in writing a column
for the newspaper? Let us know!
Send your ideas to
editor@borgernewsherald.com
and they could be considered for publication!
Note: The Borger News-Herald cannot offer
compensation to columnists at this time.
Letter to the Editor Policies
The Borger News-Herald encourages readers to
submit letters to the editor.
- The Borger News-Herald prefers typewritten
letters no longer than 550 words.
- Letter writers are limited to two letters per month.
- Provide name, phone number, and address
for verification purposes.
- Letters may be edited for length, spelling, grammar, or content.
- Borger News-Herald employees and their
families are not allowed to submit letters.
- Letters endorsing political candidates or written by political
candidates are not allowed during campaign season.
-Anonymous letters are discouraged.
Mail letters to:
Borger News Herald
Box 5130, Borger, TX 79008
Email letter to:
editor@borgernewsherald.com
4
TODAY IN HISTORY
747 BC – Epoch (origin)
of Ptolemy’s Nabonassar
Era.
364 – Valentinian I is
proclaimed Roman Em-
peror.
1233 – Mongol–Jin
War: The Mongols capture
Kaifeng, the capital of the
Jin Dynasty, after besieging
it for months.
1266 – Battle of Be-
nevento: An army led by
Charles, Count of Anjou,
defeats a combined Ger-
man and Sicilian force led
by King Manfred of Sic-
ily. Manfred is killed in the
battle and Pope Clement IV
invests Charles as king of
Sicily and Naples.
1794 – The frst Chris-
tiansborg Palace in Copen-
hagen burns down.
1815 – Napoleon
Bonaparte escapes from
Elba.
1876 – Japan and Korea
sign a treaty granting Japa-
nese citizens extraterritori-
ality rights, opening three
ports to Japanese trade, and
ending Korea’s status as a
tributary state of Qing Dy-
nasty China.
1909 – Kinemacolor,
the frst successful color
motion picture process, is
frst shown to the general
public at the Palace Theatre
in London.
1914 – HMHS Britan-
nic, sister to the RMS Titan-
ic, is launched at Harland &
Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
1917 – The Original
Dixieland Jass Band records
the frst jazz record, for the
Victor Talking Machine
Company in New York.
1919 – President Wood-
row Wilson signs an act of
the U.S. Congress estab-
lishing most of the Grand
Canyon as a United States
National Park - the Grand
Canyon National Park.
1920 – The frst Ger-
man Expressionist flm and
early horror movie, Robert
Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr.
Caligari, receives its pre-
mière in Berlin.
1929 – President Calvin
Coolidge signs an Execu-
tive Order establishing the
96,000 acre Grand Teton
National Park in Wyoming.
1935 – Adolf Hitler or-
ders the Luftwaffe to be
re-formed, violating the
provisions of the Treaty of
Versailles.
1935 – Robert Watson-
Watt carries out a dem-
onstration near Daventry
which leads directly to the
development of radar in the
United Kingdom.
1936 – In the February
26 Incident, young Japanese
military offcers attempt
to stage a coup against the
government.
1946 – Finnish observ-
ers report the frst of many
thousands of sightings of
ghost rockets.
1952 – Vincent Massey
is sworn in as the frst
Canadian-born Governor-
General of Canada.
1960 – A New York-
bound Alitalia airliner
crashes into a cemetery in
Shannon, Ireland, shortly
after takeoff, killing 34 of
the 52 persons on board.
1966 – Apollo Program:
Launch of AS-201, the
frst fight of the Saturn IB
rocket
1966 – Vietnam War:
The ROK Capital Division
of the South Korean Army
massacres 380 unarmed ci-
vilians in South Vietnam.
1971 – U.N. Secretary
General U Thant signs
United Nations proclama-
tion of the vernal equinox
as Earth Day.
1972 – The Buffalo
Creek Flood caused by a
burst dam kills 125 in West
Virginia.
1980 – Egypt and Israel
establish full diplomatic re-
lations.
1987 – Iran-Contra af-
fair: The Tower Commis-
sion rebukes President
Ronald Reagan for not con-
trolling his national secu-
rity staff.
1991 – Gulf War: United
States Army forces capture
the town of Al Busayyah.
1992 – Nagorno-Kara-
bakh War: Khojaly Massa-
cre: Armenian armed forces
open fre on Azeri civilians
at a military post outside
the town of Khojaly leaving
hundreds dead.
1993 – World Trade
Center bombing: In New
York City, a truck bomb
parked below the North
Tower of the World Trade
Center explodes, killing six
and injuring over a thou-
sand.
1995 – The United
Kingdom’s oldest invest-
ment banking institute,
Barings Bank, collapses
after securities broker Nick
Leeson, loses $1.4 billion
by speculating on the Sin-
gapore International Mone-
tary Exchange using futures
contracts.
1995 – Selena gives
her last televised concert
in front of over 66,746
people, for a record break-
ing 3rd time at the Houston
Astrodome, nearly a month
before she is shot to death
by Yolanda Saldívar, the
former president of her fan
club.
2012 – A train derails
in Burlington, Ontario,
Canada killing at least three
people and injuring 45.
2013 – A hot air balloon
crashes near Luxor, Egypt,
killing 19 people.
Opinion
How time fies.
It seems like just yester-
day I was writing a column
debunking the myth that it’s
wrong to start a sentence
with a conjunction. And it
seems like just the day be-
fore yesterday that I wrote
the same thing. And the day
before that, the same thing,
going back about 12 years
to when I started writing this
column, bright-eyed and
hopeful that I could make
a difference by debunking
grammar myths.
Foolish child. Gram-
mar superstitions are heck
of a lot more powerful than
I’ll ever be, as evidenced
by an email I got recently
from a reader named Paul
in Venice, Calif. After some
introductory matter of an ad
hominem nature (“You’re
an embarrassment” and the
like), Paul proceeded to out-
line a number of grammar
atrocities I committed in a
recent column.
I do make mistakes in
this column. When I get an
e-mail with a subject line
like “You’re very disap-
pointing,” I cringe in an-
ticipation of learning that I
made an actual, you know,
error. Happily, this was not
such an instance. All the
mistakes Paul found in my
column were his, rooted in
a slew of common grammar
superstitions. Paul’s biggest
beef, judging by the amount
of time he dedicated to it,
was that I started four sen-
tences with conjunctions.
A conjunction is a join-
ing word that comes in
several varieties. The best-
known are the coordinating
conjunctions, the most com-
mon of which are “and,”
“but,” “or” and “so.” These
words coordinate - join
- words, phrases or even
whole clauses.
A much larger group,
subordinating conjunctions
introduce clauses that are
subordinate to some other
clause in the sentence. For
example, “if” is a subordi-
nating conjunction in “If
you want me, I’ll be in my
room.” The word “if” ren-
ders the frst clause subordi-
nate, meaning it can’t stand
on its own as a complete
sentence.
There are other types of
conjunctions, too. But coor-
dinators are the ones to note
because, not only are they
the most common, they’re
also the subject of a wide-
spread grammar supersti-
tion. Some folks are taught
that it’s wrong to start a
sentence with one. So the
sentence before last, which
started with “but,” would
be considered an error. So
would this one. And this
one would, too.
Unfortunately for would-
be critics too eager to play
the “gotcha” game, that’s
superstition. But you don’t
have to take my word for it.
“There is a widespread
belief - one with no histori-
cal or grammatical founda-
tion - that it is an error to
begin a sentence with a con-
junction such as ‘and,’ ‘but,’
or ‘so,’” writes the Chicago
Manual of Style.
“’and,’ A. Beginning
sentences with. It is a rank
superstition that this coor-
dinating conjunction cannot
properly begin a sentence,”
notes Garner’s Modern
American Usage.
“’but.’ A. Beginning
sentences with. It is a gross
canard that beginning a
sentence with ‘but’ is sty-
listically slipshod. In fact,
doing so is highly desirable
in any number of contexts,
as many stylebooks have
said,” Garner’s adds.
“There is a persistent
belief that it is improper to
begin a sentence with ‘and,’
but this prohibition has been
cheerfully ignored by stan-
dard authors from Anglo-
Saxon times onwards. An
initial ‘and’ is a useful aid
to writers as the narrative
continues,” notes Fowler’s
Modern English Usage.
I wrote Paul back to
thank him, explaining that
it’s a treat to open an email
about mistakes I made to
learn that I made none. I
even threw in a little free
advice for Paul – advice of
the “Maybe do your home-
work before you fre off
emails of the ‘You are an
embarrassment’ variety.”
But Paul didn’t write back.
And I don’t expect him to
anytime soon.
- June Casagrande is the
author of “It Was the Best of
Sentences, It Was the Worst
of Sentences.” She can be
reached at JuneTCN@aol.
com.
A Word, Please
Your Column Here!
Why you should subscribe to the Borger News Herald:
* New Doctor’s Column
* New layout
* New columnist - Randy Ray, Don Newbury,
Jaimee Coburn, Janice “Nana” Bambalere
* New Staff
* Smile of the Day
* More local content
207 N. Main, Borger, Texas
Telephone: (806) 273-5611
Fax: (806) 273-2552
www.borgernewsherald.com
Publisher: Stephanie Hooper
Editor: JC Cortez
Feature Reporter: Nathan Blankenship
Production Manager: Joe Jones
Subscription Rates:
$8.50 per month for home delivery
$17.50 per month by mail
Daily: 50¢
Sunday: 75¢
2012
June Casagrande
Guest Columnist
Borger News- Herald
Sports
5
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Monday night Frank Phil-
lips College (15-14) hosted
their last home basketball
game of the season to West-
ern Texas College (22-7).
By watching the players
on the court and looking at
the score, you can tell this
was a pretty intense contest.
The Plainsmen’s plans to
make the last home game a
victory didn’t completely
happen. Unfortunatley for
the Plainsmen, Western Tex-
as College to the win home
by a fnal score of 70-64.
The top performers of the
night were; Chris Hall as he
scored 28 points! And Ter-
rance Brown for scoring 13
points.
Great season guy’s and
good luck on your last cou-
ple of games.
Plainsmen lose last
home game
For all you die hard bas-
ketball fans out there, here is
information for the girls UIL
basketball tournament being
held in Austin, Texas.
If you don’t already have
plans to go this is the time to
do it! If you don’t make it to
Austin then you may still be
able to catch it being broad-
casted.
The tournament begins
this Thursday February 27th
and runs through Saturday
March 1st at the Frank Erwin
Center in Austin.
The schedule at this time
is as follows:
Thursday, February 27...
Conference 1A Division I
Semifnals
8:30 a.m. Plains (28-
3) vs. Santo (24-8)
10:00 a.m. Weimar (33-
4) vs. Kerens (28-4)
Conference 3A Semif-
nals
1:30 p.m. Argyle (35-
1) vs. Geronimo Navarro
(33-7)
3:00 p.m. Waco La
Vega (33-0) vs. Abilene
Wylie (30-5)
Conference 4A Semif-
nals
7:00 p.m. Canyon (32-
4) vs. Georgetown (31-6)
8:30 p.m. Northside
Brennan (34-1) vs. McKin-
ney North (28-4)
Friday, February 28......
Conference 2A Semif-
nals
8:30 a.m. Hallettsville
(34-3) vs. Wall (33-4)
10:00 a.m. Brock (34-
2) vs. Franklin (30-5)
Conference 1A Division
II Semifnals
1:30 p.m. Calvert
(24-1) vs. Roscoe Highland
(28-3)
7:00 p.m. Lipan (36-1)
vs. Nazareth (34-2)
Conference 5A Semif-
nals
3:00 p.m. Duncanville
(34-0) vs. San Antonio Wag-
ner (25-10)
8:30 p.m. Manvel (36-
2) vs. Plano West (27-5)
Saturday, March 2....
8:30 a.m. Conference
1A Division I FINAL
10:00 a.m. Conference
3A FINAL
1:30 p.m. Conference
2A FINAL
3:00 p.m. Conference
4A FINAL
7:00 p.m. Conference
1A Division II FINAL
8:30 p.m. Conference
5A FINAL
Parking information for
the Girls Basketball State
Tournament can be found
on the UIL website at http://
www.uiltexas.org/basket-
ball/state-girls.
Tickets may be purchased
through Texas Box Offce
at (512) 477-6060 or www.
texasboxoffce.com Session
tickets are currently available
for $12 per session. For spe-
cifc session on-sale times,
contact the Frank Erwin
Center at (512) 477-6060.
The box offce will open one
hour prior to game time each
day of the tournament.
FOX Sports Southwest
will televise and webcast
the UIL Girls Basketball
State Tournament games.
All semifnals games on
Thursday and Friday will
be webcast on FoxSports-
Southwest.com. Champion-
ship games on Saturday will
be televised on FOX Sports
Southwest or FOX Sports
Southwest Plus, please check
your local listings. Complete
broadcast information can
be found on the UIL website
at http://www.uiltexas.org/
basketball/state-girls/girls-
basketball-state-tournament-
broadcast-information.
2014 UIL Girls Basketball State Tournament
Tuesday afternoon the
Lady Plainsmen hosted the
girls from Garden City Com-
munity College.
The games did not go the
way FPC wanted them to.
GCCC was ready to run af-
ter their bus ride here cause
they won game 1 after only
5 innings with a fnal score
of 13-0.
They must have wore
themselves out while FPC
just got warmed up. The
second game was more of
a fght for both teams.
Lady Plainsmen won
game 2. Danielle Acevedo
scored the winning run
on a ground out by Erica
Chasco which ended the
game at 10-9. The win-
ning pitcher of the game
was Austin Murillo.
A hard day for Sofball
LUBBOCK, Texas (AP)
— Marcus Foster scored 17
points, shooting 3 of 6 from
beyond the arc, to lead Kan-
sas State to a 60-56 win over
Texas Tech Tuesday night
and secure a much-needed
road win as conference play
dwindles down.
Wesley Iwundu added 12
points, 11 of them coming
in the second half, and fve
rebounds for the Wildcats.
Thomas Gipson and Will
Spradling each scored 10.
Dejan Kravic led the Red
Raiders with 13 points, six
rebounds and four blocks
and Jordan Tolbert added 10
points and nine rebounds.
Texas Tech (13-15) led by
as many as nine, 38-29, with
13:02 to go but the Wildcats
(19-9) responded with a 25-9
run, including nine consecu-
tive to end the run with a
seven-point lead, 54-47 with
4:34 to go.
Iwundu scored the go-
ahead free throw to com-
plete a 3-point play after a
layup with 55 seconds to go
to make it 57-56. Spradling
added one free throw when
Tech was forced to foul, then
Iwundu put in a layup with
one second to go after a Red
Raider turnover to close the
win
That three-pointer put
Spradling in the school re-
cord books as the 25th play-
er at Kansas State to score
1,000 points. The win also
gives coach Bruce Weber the
best two-year start in Kansas
State history with 46 wins,
passing Lon Kruger.
Kansas State led for most
of the frst half until Kravic
sank two free throws to take
a 17-16 lead with 7:06 left
in the half. The Wildcats re-
gained the lead on a pair of
Gipson free throws to make
it 25-24 with 1:05 until the
break, but Dusty Hannahs hit
a jumper with 41 seconds in
the half and the Red Raiders
took a 26-25 lead into the
locker room.
The Red Raiders came
out of the break fred up and
built the lead to as many
as nine points on a Kravic
layup with 13:02 to go, but
the Wildcats fought back and
took their frst lead in almost
ffteen minutes on an Iwundu
dunk with 5:35 to go to make
it 48-47.
That dunk ignited a 9-0
Kansas State run led by Nino
Williams and capped off with
a 3-pointer by Spradling to
boost the Wildcats ahead 54-
47.
Texas Tech called a tim-
eout and regained focus with
a run of its own, scoring
seven points in 44 seconds,
between 3:33 and 2:49, to tie
it 54-54.
A few Red Raiders were
on the foor fghting for a
loose ball that Kansas State
recovered and got into the
hands of Iwundu, who ma-
neuvered around Hannahs
for a layup and a trip to the
line. Iwundu made the shot
to take a 57-56 lead with 55
seconds to go.
When Texas Tech was
forced to foul, Spradling
made the frst of two free
throws to lead 58-56. The
Red Raiders missed an op-
portunity to tie or win as a
miscommunication resulted
in Robert Turner turning the
ball over to Foster, which led
to an Iwundu layup.
The Red Raiders out-re-
bounded the Wildcats 34-24
and scored 16 second chance
points to the Wildcats four
but didn’t close it out in the
fnal minute.
Kansas State fights past Texas Tech 60-56
The Sochi Olympics are
over and the NHL is back
after freezing its schedule so
that the world’s best hockey
players could compete for
gold — perhaps for the last
time.
Sidney Crosby won an-
other Olympic championship
with Canada. Now, Sid the
Kid wants to help the Pitts-
burgh Penguins hoist the
Stanley Cup again.
Crosby and the Penguins
host Montreal on Thursday,
the third day of league games
after the Olympic break, just
four days after helping the
Canadians beat Sweden in
the gold-medal game in Rus-
sia.
“In some ways, it will
help, playing at this speed in
one-game elimination with
desperation,” Crosby said
Sunday after the fnal com-
petition of the Sochi Games.
“I haven’t really had this
transition midseason with
Olympic ice, going back to
regular size, but I don’t think
it’s a bad thing.”
In the East, Boston holds a
seven-point lead over Tampa
Bay in the Atlantic Division
coming out of the Olympic
break. Pittsburgh holds a
16-point lead over the Rang-
ers in the Metropolitan.
It’s much tighter in the
West, where St. Louis and
defending champion Chi-
cago are tied atop the Cen-
tral Division, just fve points
in front of Colorado. The
Ducks have the conference’s
top mark and a seven-point
lead on San Jose.
The NHL is going to have
its ffth and sixth outdoor
games of the season on Sat-
urday, when the Chicago
Blackhawks play Pittsburgh
at Soldier feld, and the next
day in a Vancouver-Ottawa
matchup at BC Place.
Despite seemingly having
success with the expansion
of the concept beyond an
annual Winter Classic, NHL
Commissioner Gary Bett-
man isn’t ready to say there
will be more than one game
exposed to the elements next
season.
“We haven’t made any
decisions about how many
games next year (will be out-
doors), but the games this
year so far have been noth-
ing short of spectacular,”
Bettman said in an interview
with The Associated Press
during the Olympics. “The
Winter Classic had over
100,000 people in Michigan,
played in the snow, and at
two games in Yankee Sta-
dium and the game in Los
Angeles, fans couldn’t have
been more engaged.
“When you think about
the impact of these regular
season games have had, it
shows you how excited our
fans get about the outdoor
games.”
The Detroit Red Wings
lost to Toronto in a shoo-
tout at the Big House on
New Year’s Day, giving the
Maple Leafs an extra point
that could prove to be pivotal
when the regular season ends
April 13. The storied fran-
chises are likely competing
for one of the two wild-card
bids in the Eastern Confer-
ence.
If the playoffs began to-
day, the Red Wings would
extend their postseason
streak to 23. Detroit made it
last year by only one point
and the race might be as tight
again with Columbus, Ot-
tawa, Washington, Carolina
and New Jersey within a win
or two of moving into a wild-
card spot.
“When we play teams like
Montreal and Toronto, those
are really like four-point
games,” Red Wings general
manager Ken Holland said.
In the Western Confer-
ence, which appears to be
flled with better teams, it
looks like Dallas, Phoenix,
Vancouver, Winnipeg and
Nashville may be vying for
the eighth and fnal spot in
the playoffs. The Buffalo
Sabres, meanwhile, have an
NHL-low 38 points — nine
fewer than the last place
team, Edmonton, in the
Western Conference.
That gives Buffalo plenty
of incentive to shop goalten-
der Ryan Miller and his ex-
piring contract. Miller was
primarily used as a backup
for the United States in the
Olympics.
The Sabres are running
out of time to get something
in return for the face of their
franchise. The NHL’s trade
deadline is March 5.
Some teams that were
hit by injuries during the
Olympics may make moves
to replace the players they
lost. Others, such as Buffalo,
might decide to trade talent-
ed or expensive players if it
appears they have no shot to
be a part of the postseason.
NHL heads back to the ice afer Olympic break
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — The University of Arkan-
sas men’s track and feld team remains No. 1 and the women’s
team No. 4 in the latest rankings by the U.S. Track and Field
and Cross Country Coaches Association.
The Razorbacks have been the top-ranked team in the na-
tion throughout the indoor season while the women are No.
4 for the second week in a row after reaching the top fve last
week.
Florida and Texas A&M from the Southeastern Confer-
ence are ranked second and third in the men’s poll. Oregon is
No. 1 in the women’s poll, followed by Florida, Texas A&M
and Arkansas.
UA men No. 1, women
No. 4 in track and feld
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — University of Arkansas
gymnast Katherine Grable has been named the Southeastern
Conference co-Gymnast of the Week.
Grable’s selection was announced by the SEC Tuesday.
Grable was chosen after winning the vault, bars, beam,
and foor events and won the all-around title during a week-
end event against Kentucky.
Grable is currently ranked the No. 2 overall gymnast in
the country.
UA’s Grable is co-SEC
Gymnast of the Week
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Heis-
man Trophy winner Jameis
Winston has no plans to stop be-
ing a two-sport man.
“I’m just 20-years old,” Win-
ston said Tuesday after Florida
State lost 8-3 in the New York
Yankees’ spring training opener.
“This is my life, man. I want to
play both as long as I can. I love
both of them. I’ve got a strong
passion for both.”
Florida State’s quarterback
in the fall, Winston went 0 for
2 in the Seminoles’ exhibition
game against the Yankees. He
grounded out to second base
while facing Shane Greene in
the sixth and struck out looking
on a full-count pitch from Bryan
Mitchell two innings later.
“Obviously, he’s a great
talent,” Yankees manager Joe
Girardi said. “I guess he had a
football injury in the champion-
ship game which kept him from
hitting for a while. But he’s just
starting to pick up the bat again.
I guess he had torn a ligament in
his left index fnger.”
Winston has made three
scoreless appearances as a
closer this season but didn’t get
a chance to pitch against his fa-
vorite baseball team. Seminoles
coach Mike Martin said Win-
ston’s arm was a little tender
after his outing Saturday.
“There were really not any
plans for him to pitch,” Martin
said. “Not throwing today gives
him Sunday, Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday off before
he pitches again. We felt that
would be the best way to ap-
proach it.”
Florida State plays Miami on
Friday.
Winston played in the feld
twice previously this year, get-
ting a hit in his lone at-bat.
Against Greene, the 6- foot-4,
230-pound sophomore got a
big cheer from the announced
crowd of 7,708 at Steinbrenner
Field after shattering his bat on
foul grounder.
“The favorite part of the
day was just being out here,”
Winston said. “Being around a
bunch of big league guys, and
they proved it. They beat us.”
Winston talked with his fa-
vorite player, Derek Jeter, call-
ing the meeting “surreal.” Win-
ston said playing for the Yankees
“would be a dream come true.”
“I guess it feels like when
I talk to little kids, how they
feel sometimes,” Winston said.
“They’re speechless, and that’s
how I was with Jeter.”
Winston led the Florida State
football team to the national
championship in a 34-31 victory
over Auburn on Jan. 6.
“I’m focusing on getting our
guys to the College World Se-
ries,” he said. “It’s very impor-
tant to those guys in that club-
house, and it’s very important to
the coaches.”
Heisman winner Winston
bats against Yankees
The Borger
News-Herald
Newspapers In
Education
Kids’ Page is
sponsored by:
Chevron-Phillips
Gold Sponsor
Morton Lumber
Ace Hardware
Traditions
Oil and Gas
If your business
or organization
would like to
sponsor this
important
program,
please contact
Stephanie Hooper,
Publisher,
by e-mail at
publisher@
borgernewsherald.
com or by calling
273-5611.
6
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014
Borger News- Herald
Kids Page
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Discussions with friends,
especially in groups, are
important today. Perhaps this is
because you are in contact with
old friends and people from your
past. Sometimes this is a reality
check.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Personal details about your
private life might be made public
today, especially in the eyes of
bosses, parents and VIPs. Quite
likely, this is about something
from your past. (Fingers
crossed.)
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
You want change, adventure
and a chance to learn something
new! That’s why you’d like to
visit someplace you’ve never
been before. Vary your daily
routine. Shake it up a little.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
Discussions about shared
property, taxes, debt, inheritances
and insurance matters can clear
away old business today. Just
keep at it, and you will make
some headway.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Your interactions with ex-
partners might be emotional
today. Don’t take things
personally. Remember that
nobody’s perfect, even a Leo (as
hard as that might be to believe).
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Do what you can to get better
organized today. Talk to others,
especially about old business and
things that have been dragging
on that might annoy you. Clear
away as much as you can.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
This is a playful, creative day
for you! Enjoy sports events, fun
times with children, movies, the
theater and social occasions. Be
happy.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Family discussions will be
productive today. In particular,
you can tackle old problems
and decide what to do, once and
for all. Get a female relative
onboard.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21)
You’re eager to learn something
new today. This is why you will
enjoy short trips or a chance to
read and study something. You’ll
also enjoy meeting new faces and
seeing new places.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan.
19)
Watch your money and cash
fow today, because something
unpredictable might occur. It’s
natural for you to feel protective
about what you own.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18)
The Moon is in your sign
today, lined up with retrograde
Mercury. This means you might
feel emotional when talking to
people from your past. That’s
perfectly normal.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20)
Secrets might come up today.
This is an excellent day to do
research of any kind, or to search
for answers and solutions.
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014
Borger News- Herald Comics
7
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
i n thi s newspaper i s sub-
j ect to the federal fai r
housi ng act of 1968
whi ch makes i t i l l egal to
adverti se “any prefer-
ence, l i mi tati on or di s-
cri mi nati on based on
race, col or, rel i gi on,
handi cap, fami l y status,
sex or nati onal ori gi n, or
an i ntenti on to make any
such preference, l i mi ta-
tion or discrimination.”
Thi s newspaper wi l l not
knowingly accept any ad-
verti si ng for real estate
which is in violation of the
l aw. Our readers are
hereby i nformed that al l
dwel l i ngs adverti sed i n
thi s newspaper are avai l -
able on an equal opportu-
nity basis.
340 APART. RENTALS
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
BUYING JUNK CARS
wi th good ti tl es and scrap
iron (806)663-6907
290 MISC. WANTED
D I S H T V R E -
T A I L E R . S T A R T -
I N G $19.99/month
(for 12 mos.)
Broadband Inter-
net
starting
$14.95/month
(where availa-
ble.) Ask About
SAME DAY Instal-
lation!
CALL Now! 1-800-
593-2572
230 MISC. FOR SALE
TWIN SIZE BUNKBEDS
FOR sal e! Sti l l i n Pl asti c!
Call (806)595-0322
160 FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONAL HOUSE
CLEANING. MANY Years
Experi ence. Pl ease Cal l
(806)886-6965
LVN avai l abl e for pri vate
duty. Please Call (806)395-
1455
110 WORK WANTED
BUSY DOCTORS offi ce
needs part-ti me nurse.
Send Resume to p.o.box
5130 Borger, Tx-79008
090 HELP WANTED
010 SPECIAL
SPECIAL
Panhandle Gun
& Knife Show
cooïaç /o
9o-çc-
June 7th & 8th
For Booth Information Call 806-273-5611
and ask for Stephanie Hooper!
Hiring a
MACHINIST
with at least
2 years
experience.
Applicants can
Apply in person
at Disco
1400 N. Main
Experience Oilfield
Roustabout Wanted
Near Masterson.
Pay is $13/hr &
up depending
upon experience.
Water truck exp. a
plus! Perm. f/t w/
pd. benefits after
probationary period.
MUST HAVE TX DL!
CDL a Plus! Please
call (806)935-7563.
DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
�� �� ������� ������� �� � ������������
��������� ��������� ����� � ���� ������� �������
��� ��� �������� ��������� ������� ������� �����
���������� ��� ���� ���� ����
�� ����� ����������� ��������� ���� ���� � �������
���� ���������� �������������� ���� ��������� ���������
Therapist Tech I
$9.07/hr Group Home
��������� � ���������
������ ���� �� ������� ���� �������������
������������ �� � ��� ������������ ��������
Large 3 Bedroom
Home Available for
Contractors, Only
$650 per person
including utilities.
Available Saturday
March 1st.
Call 806-273-5557
for details.
DEALER’s IS NEEDING A WARE-
HOUSE/COUNTER SALES MUST BE
21 OR OLDER, HAVE VALID DL APPLY
IN PERSON @ 214 N. CEDAR
Large 1 bdrm apartment.
Stove, refrigerator,
AC & Some furniture.
Lighted off-street parking.
Nice quiet neighborhood.
$475, includes utilities.
(806) 273-3343
Need a
Part Time
Maintenance
person for a
new 48 unit
apt. complex.
Apply in person
at 400 E. 10th
St., Borger, Tx.
Mechanic
Needed:
CoreTerra
Operating is looking
to fill a mechanic’s
position. Must
have experience
in truck, rig and
heavy equipment
repair. Welding and
electrical experience
is preferred.
Employee medical
paid after 90 days.
Apply in person at
2601 W. Kentucky
Ave, Pampa, TX.
(806) 688-9291
Full Time CDL-A-X Crude Oil
Transport Drivers Needed
Pampa, Perryton, Borger,
Wheeler, Canadian
Local Hauling-Home Daily, Weekly Paycheck
Paid Orientation/Training, Vacation,
401K, Life, Medical, Dental, Vision
Minimum of 12 months T/T or
Tanker experience required
Call Lori Hernandez 800/737-9981
or visit us online at www.MIPE.com
LVNS
JOIN OUR TEAM!
Immediate openings on
various shifts for state
licensed professionals;
Competitive rates & ben-
efits available. EOE. For
more information, call
our DON 806-273-3785
or apply Mon-Fri: 9a-4p.
BORGER
HEALTHCARE CENTER
1316 South Florida
Borger
TAX SERVICE
Glenda
Brownlee
628 Whittenburg
274-2142
In Home Nanny Needed.
7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Monday - Friday.
Watching a 3 yr. old girl
on a 10 acre horse farm
between Borger & Fritch.
Call 972-955-5060
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
h
e
W
a
t
e
r
H
e
a
t
e
r
B
a
r
g
a
i
n
H
o
u
s
e
HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
C
a
r
t
e
r

s
T
r
e
e
S
e
r
v
i
c
e
Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
NOW Taking Credit Cards!
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
K

s
MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
BORGER NEWS-HERALDservice directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Kristie or Mikaela at 273-5611
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
WT Vapors
Great Selection of
eGo-C - Twist
Batteries - Tanks
Atomizers - Vapors
Accessories - Much More!!
722 Weatherly - Borger
www.wtvapors.com
806-274-8874
Like Us On FACEBOOK!!
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
109 S. Main
Borger
806-274-3474
The Body
Shop
Expert Body Repair & Painting
BODY SHOP
Breedlove’s
Auto FX
806-567-6967
Full Auto Detailing
319 Weatherly
AUTO DETAILING
TATTOOS AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
4106 Georgia St. • Amarillo
David Shannon
806-322-3688 • 806-679-3221
Cars • Harleys • Trucks
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
J&D Remodeling
• Tile • Drywal
• Paint (Inside/Out)
• Wod Flor
Refinishing
& Much More..
Free Estimates Call
David at 806-275-0841
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
REMODELING CAREGIVERS
JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
R
o
o
f
n
g
, C
o
n
c
r
e
te
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
o
r
k
,
F
lo
o
r
in
g
a
n
d
m
o
r
e
..
C
a
ll fo
r
y
o
u
r
e
s
t
im
a
t
e
t
o
d
a
y
!
(8
0
6
) 2
4
0
-
1
7
9
6
V
E
R
D
E
C
O
N
S
T
R
U
C
T
I
O
N
CONCRETE CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
1/2 Off Security
Deposit
For the Month
of February
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
On 2 & 3
Bedrooms
Apartments!
806-273-2766
The Good Book Says...
Ask and you shall receive, and
He has never let me down! I
am asking God to help me find
an honest financial partner to
recondition homes in the Borger
area. Money is secured by local
real estate. If you or someone you
know would be interested, please
contact: Charles Hogan
(806)395-6245
or email
charleshogan1@sbcglobal.net
HELP WANTED
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
DEAR ABBY: I’d like to
tell your readers about a won-
derful program I discovered
about a year ago. It’s called
Overeaters Anonymous
(OA). The program is simi-
lar to AA, but it’s for people
with an eating problem.
For years, I struggled to
lose weight. I tried dozens of
diets, pills and saw several
doctors. I would lose some
weight, but I could never
stick with a program, so I
gained back more than I lost.
I felt like a loser.
I was a food junkie. I ate
when I was happy, sad, de-
pressed, bored or lonely.
I would buy candy at the
checkout counter at the mar-
ket and eat it on the way
home. Then I’d hide the
wrapper in the garage so my
family wouldn’t know I ate
it.
I hid candy in the kitchen
cabinets so no one would fnd
it, then I’d sneak in and eat it
later. I could never have only
one serving size of chips or
cookies. I would consume
half a bag before I stopped.
Since joining OA, I have
lost more than 50 pounds
and feel like a new person.
I have a new outlook on life
and no longer have to rely on
food. It’s good to be able to
talk with people who have
the same problems I do. It’s
a daily struggle, but I have a
sponsor and others to talk to
when I’m tempted to return
to my old life.
Compulsive eating is a
disease, Abby. And unless
people have it, they don’t
understand. I hope this let-
ter will help someone who is
also struggling. -- GRATE-
FUL O.A. MEMBER IN IL-
LINOIS
DEAR GRATEFUL: I’m
glad you found OA. It’s a
wonderful organization that
has been around for many
years. About 20 years ago,
I was fortunate to meet the
woman who founded it -- and
she was a doll -- and I know
the program has helped many
thousands of people. Often
when a person has weight is-
sues, it is less about what he
or she is eating than it is what
is eating the PERSON.
Readers, OA has about
6,500 groups in more than
75 countries. There are no
requirements for member-
ship except a sincere desire
to stop eating compulsively.
Everyone is there to offer
mutual support. I have at-
tended some of the meetings,
and there is no weighing and
no embarrassment. There is
only a fellowship of compas-
sionate people who share a
common problem.
There are OA chapters
everywhere, but if you have
trouble locating one, go to
www.oa.org, or send a long,
self-addressed stamped en-
velope to Overeaters Anony-
mous World Service, P.O.
Box 44020, Rio Rancho,
NM 87174-4020. The email
address is info(at)oa.org.
Roommate Loses Sleep
When Friend Brings Home
A Date
DEAR ABBY: Because
of fnances, I still live with
my ex-partner. We have been
friends for 15 years. We split
all the bills, and for the most
part we get along quite well.
One thing has been both-
ering me, though. How
should I handle things when
he brings home a date? I am
aware he becomes intimate,
and occasionally it becomes
quite loud. I have talked to
him about this, and he says I
should turn up the TV. I have
asked him if he wants me to
leave for the night to give
him privacy. The answer is
no, that it doesn’t bother him
if I stay, but it becomes un-
comfortable for me.
How should I approach
this in an adult manner? I
love him dearly, but this is
very awkward! -- EMBAR-
RASSED
DEAR EMBAR-
RASSED: It is laudable that
you and your former partner
are on such good terms. Out
of consideration for you,
why doesn’t he plan to stay
at his date’s home or apart-
ment whenever possible? If
it isn’t possible, ask him to
let you know beforehand so
you can make arrangements
to be elsewhere for the night.
I think you’d both sleep bet-
ter.
Program for compulsive eaters
gives new outlook on life
Dear Abby
WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 26, 2014 Borger News- Herald 10
Community
WITH INPUT FROM LOCAL CITIZENS, KEL HAS WORKED HARD
TO DELIVER CONSERVATIVE AND RESPONSIBLE RESULTS
Fighting to repeal Obamacare and its tax
Proven leader to secure future water resources for West Texas (Prop 6)
Helped pass a balanced state budget with no tax increase
Restored $5.6 billion in state public education funding
Voted for a $1.4 billion business tax cut
Supported increased border security measures
Voted for stronger pro-life and pro-family reforms
Strengthened property owner and gun owner rights
Voted for mandatory drug testing for state unemployment benefts
267
www.KelSeliger.com
Campaign Hotline: 432-528-9427
Email: Lauren@kelseliger.com
Pol. Ad by Kel Seliger Campaign
Republican Primary: March 4, 2014
Early Voting: February 18 - 28
Staying true to his original campaign promise to hold at least one townhall
meeting annually in each of the 37 counties he serves in the Texas Senate,
Kel Seliger recently completed his 267th Town Hall Meeting.
Townhall Meetings & Counting!
Kel listens
and gets it done!
Borger News Herald’s
Valentine’s Day Coloring Contest Winners
3rd Place winner Aliza Dawson
Ages 7-10 Category
Ages 3-6 Category
2nd place winner Justin Phares
3rd Place winner Olivia Mosley 1st Place winner Tori Broom
Not pictured: 2nd Place winner Annie Juarez (3-6) and 1st Place winner Davyun Wickerson (7-10)
CALGARY - Agrium
Inc. (TSX:AGU) says
it’s going ahead with a
US$720-million plan to
expand its nitrogen plant
in Borger, Texas.
The Calgary-based fer-
tilizer giant announced
Tuesday its board of di-
rectors has approved the
project, which will add a
new urea production unit
of about 610,000 tonnes.
Of that, about 100,000
tonnes will be fuel-grade
urea, which can be used
to reduce nitrogen oxide
emissions in vehicles.
The expansion will also
increase annual ammo-
nia capacity by 145,000
tonnes to about 635,000
tonnes.
Construction is set to
begin next month and is
expected to wrap up in the
second half of 2015.
In addition to nitrogen,
Agrium also produces and
sells potash and phos-
phates.
“Agrium is one of the
largest and lowest cost
producers of nitrogen in
the world. The upgrade
and expansion at the
Borger facility will con-
tinue to grow our nitrogen
footprint in this impor-
tant agricultural region
while providing a strong
return on investment. The
project will ensure the
facility’s future longev-
ity, while using the latest
in environmental control
technology,” said CEO
Chuck Magro.
“The expansion project
will also provide greater
flexibility to meet changes
in demand by product and
region and reduce our reli-
ance on existing ammonia
distribution channels.”
Agrium plans $720M
expansion to nitrogen
plant in Borger, Texas
Stay
Informed
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
COLLEGE STATION,
Feb. 25, 2014 – Visiting
your zip code very soon:
snakes, and perhaps plenty
of them. With warm temper-
atures and upcoming spring
rainfall, experts say it’s get-
ting that time of year when
snakes are on the prowl, or
at least on the slither. With
Texas a ground zero for
many snake populations,
people and pets should be
aware that snakes are out
and about, says a Texas
A&M University expert re-
garding the creatures.
Jill Heatley, associ-
ate professor of veterinary
medicine, notes that this
is the time of year when
snakes forsake their comfy
winter surroundings and
head out and about, and that
could mean bad news for
people and their pets. She
and other veterinarians in
the Small Animal Hospital
at Texas A&M University’s
College of Veterinary Med-
icine & Biomedical Sci-
ences are expecting to see
snakebite cases any day.
“I spoke with one of our
emergency room doctors
the other day and said to be
sure and tell pet owners that
dogs and cats are likely to
encounter snakes this time
of year,” she says. “If you
believe your pet has been
bitten, you need to seek vet-
erinary care and the doctor
can determine what kind of
treatment is necessary.”
She says a snakebite on
a human can be painful –
and very expensive.
It is not uncommon for
a person bitten by a venom-
ous snake to have medical
bills of $50,000 or more
because of hospitalization,
which can run from one
day to several weeks, treat-
ments on damaged tissues,
plus antivenin treatments
that can run into the thou-
sands of dollars, she adds.
Although snakes are
found in most of the world
– Ireland, Iceland and New
Zealand are some of the
few snake-free countries
– only four types found in
Texas are venomous: the
coral snake, copperhead,
rattlesnake and cotton-
mouth (also called water
moccasin), and the state is
a slithering paradise for all
of them.
“The thing to remember
about snakes is that gener-
ally, they want to be left
alone. They are probably
more afraid of you,” Heat-
ley explains.
“Of the four types of
venomous snakes in Texas,
the coral, copperhead and
rattlesnake are almost never
aggressive unless they are
provoked. The cottonmouth
has been known to be a
little on the aggressive side,
so you should be a little
more wary of it, especially
if you are near a creek or
lake where they have been
frequently seen.”
Heatley says snakes are
becoming more active and
many are changing out of
their skin – and that can re-
veal a key clue.
“This is the time of
year when all reptiles be-
come more active. Even
water turtles begin to shed
their scutes for the shiny
new ones underneath,” she
adds.
Heatley says an inquisi-
tive pet can be a snakebite
victim.
If bitten, a dog usually
suffers the bite on its face
or nose, while cats tend to
be nicked on their paws,
she explains.
“The area that has been
bitten will usually begin to
swell almost immediately,
and that’s a tell-tale sign to
look for,” she notes. Venom
can spread quickly inside
the animal, and kidney fail-
ure can result within 12 to
24 hours, which is why a
bitten animal needs imme-
diate treatment.
She says it’s important
to know that all snakebites
are not the same.
“Sometimes an animal
or person will get just a
small amount of venom
from a bite, and sometimes
it’s much more,” she adds.
“There is also such a
thing as a ‘dry bite’ in which
no venom is injected at all.
And also, larger snakes tend
to have lesser amounts of
venom than smaller ones.
“One of the questions
we often get is, how can you
tell a venomous snake from
a harmless one? The answer
is that’s diffcult because
there are numerous types of
snakes that are not venom-
ous that look very similar
to a venomous one. Look
for the triangular- shaped
head,” Heatley notes, while
adding that coral snakes are
brightly colored with rows
of yellow, red and black
markings. But a coral snake
is part of the cobra family,
so its venom can be very
potent.
For more information
about snakes, she recom-
mends such websites as
Herps of Texas, Austin
Herpetological Society and
Texas Parks and Wildlife.
Warm weather in Texas means
watch out for snakes, says Texas
A&M expert
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
Wednesday February 26, 2014.pdf9.63 MB
View more articles in:
Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes