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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

March 25, 2014

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The Hutchinson Coun-
ty Friends of the Library
will be holding the Spring
Book Sale April 10-12 at
the Borger Library.
A previous feature--
members only night-- will
be re-instituted with a new
twist: on Thursday, April
10, from 4:00-7:00, mem-
bers only will shop, but in-
dividuals who are not cur-
rent members may join by
paying a half-year dues of
$5.00. All members who
register on that night will
be entered in a drawing
for a ffty-dollar gift card
to Barnes and Noble.
Sale hours for Friday
are 10:00-5:00 and for
Saturday 10:00-2:00.
Hardback books of-
fered in the sale include
fction, biography, health
and ftness, reference,
large print, classics, reli-
gion, children’s selections,
and other types of non-
fction. Paperbacks of all
types are also available.
Prices are: 50¢ for
adult hardbacks, 25¢ for
chidlren’s hardbacks, and
all paperbacks are two for
25¢. All proceeds from the
sale are used by the three
county libraries for non-
budgeted items.
As an additional special
feature, on Thursday from
5:30-7:00 in the Borger li-
brary will be a book sign-
ing by Joy Lene, author
of Choose You this Day--
Holiday or Holy Day.
Mrs. Lene is a local
author living in Fritch and
is a graduate of Sanford-
Fritch High School.
She was inspired to
write the book, her frst,
by a deep study of the
Scriptures detailing the
feasts and festivals of the
Old Testament and their
fulfllment in Jesus Christ.
Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Jere
Blakeman
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
“Everything you see
I owe to spaghetti.”
-Sophia Loren
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Sports
Community
Service Directory
Classifeds
Pictures
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
St. John’s to hold 59th Annual Italian
Meatballs and Spagheti Dinner
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
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news and the latest sports scores!
Don’t
Miss
Around Town with
Don Rice
Pet Talk
and
Crime Reports Inside!
Come eat some spa-
ghetti and meatballs at St.
John the Evangelist Catho-
lic Church, 201 St. John’s
Road.
This dinner is the 59th
annual Italian Meatballs
and Spaghetti Dinner that
St. John the Evan gelist
Catholic Church has of-
fered to the public. The
dinner will take place Sun-
day, April 6, 2014, from 11
to 5 p.m.
Adult advance tickets
are $8 and $9 at the door
and children are $3 and $4
at the door. Take outs will
be available.
According to Marilyn
Archer, who is active in the
church, the frst din ner was
held in 1952 in the FHA
Building in Bu navista as
an effort to raise money
to help with the tuition of
a young man who was a
member of the church. Two
hundred and ffty people
were served at that time.
“The next two years the
dinners were held at the
Girl Scout Little House,
then a year was skipped
because everyone was busy
working on the new school
for St. John’s, and the next
year, 1956, the dinner was
held in the new school gym
and the tradition has con-
tinued from then,” she said.
“That Sunday marks the
59th annual Italian Meat-
ball and Spaghetti Dinner
for St. John the Evangelist
Church in Borger.”
She said the recipes
for the meat balls, sauce,
and salad came from Ol-
lie Bertorelli and his wife
Lena. Six people: The
Bertorellis, Jim and Dol-
lie Stark, and Dick and
Holly Tweedspent a lot
of time and effort making
sure everyone in the parish
worked together to create a
memorable, smooth-turn-
ing, enjoyable fundraiser.
“At that time, Romano
cheese and olive oil (for
the salad) were not read-
ily available, so both were
imported from Italy, the
cheese in 25 lb. rounds,
and the olive oil in two-
gallon tins,” Archer said.
“Fortunately, they no lon-
ger need to be imported,
as both are now easy to
pur chase. The bread is
ordered in especially for
the dinner, since we use so
much.”
The recipe for the sauce
and the meat balls was a
closely guarded secret for
many years, she said. The
meat is ground and mixed
with spices and onions
and rolled by hand into
meatballs. On the day of
the dinner, ladies chop
lettuce, celery, tomatoes,
and onions for the salad,
topped off with some ol-
ives and the light, spicy
Italian dressing. Butter
and chopped gar lic are
mixed together and spread
on the bread.
“At the dinner, young
people dressed in white
shirts and black pants
make sure you have plen-
ty of reflls,” Archer said.
“Take out is also popular,
and is my fa vorite, as I get
to take it home to have for
later!”
Nowadays, the church
serves around 3,000 peo-
ple, and many look for-
ward to it every year. She
said the most served was
about 20 years ago, about
3,500. Everyone in the
parish helps, from cook-
ing to buying the food to
selling tickets to serving
to washing dishes to roll-
ing meatballs to advertis-
ing to putting it all away
afterwards.
“We have all have the
best time, even though it
is a lot of work,” Archer
said.
Michelle Berry
Sponsored By: Golden Plains Community
Hospital - 100 Medical Dr,
Borger, TX 79007 - (806) 467-5700
DAILY GOOD DEED
Donate to the
Salvation Army
Local Weather
Tue
3/25
62/42
Plentiful sunshine. High 62F.
Winds S at 15 to 25 mph.
Wed
3/26
66/53
A few showers possible, windy.
Highs in the mid 60s and lows in
the low 50s.
Thu
3/27
71/38
Windy with a mix of sun and
clouds.
Fri
3/28
71/39
Plenty of sun. Highs in the low 70s
and lows in the upper 30s.
Sat
3/29
77/50
Sunny. Highs in the upper 70s and
lows in the low 50s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content
Service
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 71, 10 Pages
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Volunteers roll meatballs in preparation for the annual dinner scheduled for Sunday, April 6. - Photo by Don Rice
Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale April 10-12
Lydia Fowlkes prepares for a seasonal book sale at the Borger Library. - Photo by Don Rice
Lydia Fowlkes
Submitted
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014 Borger News- Herald
2
Obituaries
SHERIFF OFFICE REPORT
·3-18-14 Deputies responded to a theft call on Main street in Sanford
·3-21-14 Jose Pimentel Medina was arrested on an out of county warrant
·3-21-14 Deputies responded to an accident on the Canadian River bridge near
Borger
·3-21-14 Sabrina Waugh was taken into custody for warrants out of the City of
Borger. Waugh was transported to Borger PD and released to their custody.
·3-21-14 Deputies responded to a dog attack on Avey lane in Fritch
·3-21-14 Deputies took a burglary report on Lantelme road in Stinnett
·3-22-14 Deputies responded to a call of debris on Hwy 136 between Borger
and Fritch
·3-22-14 Deputies were dispatched to Fritch drive to recover property
·3-22-14 Deputies responded to cattle on HWY 136 south of Stinnett
·3-23-14 Shelby Ann Smith was arrested on an out of county warrant
·3-23-14 Deputies assisted another agency with taking a combative subject into
custody on Turner in Borger
·3-23-14 Deputies responded to assist another agency with taking an individual
into custody on Pecan in Borger
·3-23-14 Deputies responded to assist another agency with a medical call on
Flintridge road in Fritch
POLICE REPORT
Calls for Service
03.08.14
- W. 10th for a narcotics violation
- Kiekbusch for a narcotics violation
- Bowie for a disturbance
- Cloverleaf for report of an accident
- Gardner for disorderly conduct
- Galahad for disorderly conduct
- Maple for fre/medical
- Gardner for disorderly conduct
- Huber Park for a reckless driver
- N. Main for a disturbance
- Lucky Eddie’s for a bar check
- S. Main for a welfare check
03.09.14
- Elmore for a 911 hangup
- Cobblestone for harassment
- Peiffer for an open door/window
- N. Harvey for suspicious activity
- Todd for a disturbance
- Cooley for unauthorized use of a
motor vehicle/auto theft
- Thrams for report of an accident
- Coffee for fre/medical
- McGee for harassment
- Inverness for a disturbance
- E. Adams for disorderly conduct
- S. Cedar for a parking complaint
- S. Hedgecoke for a disturbance
- Butadieno for suspicious activity
- Allsup’s on Wilson for criminal
mischief
03.10.14
- Whittenburg for a theft in-progress
- Allsup’s on Wilson for a theft in-
progress
- Dillard for report of theft
- Inverness for criminal mischief
- N. Weatherly for lost/recovered
property
- N. Bryan for a 911 hangup
- Weatherly for a warrant service
- Jackson for a disturbance
- Bulldog for a welfare check
- Western for suspicious activity
- Medical for report of assault
- Bryan for a welfare check
- N. Main for a narcotics violation
- Boyd for a disturbance
- High Plains Helping Hands for
report of an accident
- S. Florida for report of theft
- Kiekbusch for report of theft
- W. Wilson for a disturbance
- Womack for disorderly conduct
- Mississippi for report of theft
- S. Florida for report of theft
- Alley behind Sheriff’s Offce for
suspicious activity
- W. Jefferson for a welfare check
- Clayton for report of theft
03.11.14
- Lucky Eddie’s for a bar check
- Industrial Blvd. for a 911 hangup
- Whittenburg for a welfare check
- Lee for a warrant service
- E. 3rd for lost/recovered property
- E. of Agrium for fre/medical
- W. Wilson for report of an accident
- McCarthy for criminal mischief
- Medical for a welfare check
- Harvey & 3rd for report of an ac-
cident
- Mississippi for a disturbance
- S. Cedar for an abandoned vehicle
- Lee & Hemlock for a disturbance
- N. McGee for criminal mischief
- Timberlake for a warrant service
- Mississippi for harassment
- Boyd for criminal mischief
03.12.14
- Minnesota & Hemlock for suspi-
cious activity
- N. McGee for a prowler
- N. Weatherly for a narcotics viola-
tion
- N. McGee for suspicious activity
- Caliche for a welfare check
- Timberlake for a warrant service
- FM 1551 for a reckless driver
- O’Daniel for report of theft
- N. Weatherly for a freworks com-
plaint
- 10th & Florida for a reckless driver
- Hwy 207 for an accident with
injuries
- Carolina for report of an accident
- Union & Peiffer for a DWI
- Lindsey for a disturbance
03.13.14
- Alabama for shots fred
- Missouri for report of burglary
- W. Jefferson for suspicious activity
- W. 3rd for report of burglary
- Mississippi for report of theft
- W. Grand for fre/medical
- Hwy 136 & Walmart for a reckless
driver
- Hwy 1551 & Hwy 136 for a DWI
Local Weather
We’ll start today with light winds, but unfortunately, it won’t stay that way.
Wind speeds will increase to 15-25 mph this afternoon with high temperatures
near 60°. We’ll see a good amount of sunshine today!
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Brian James
Mary Janice Medford Taylor Scroggins
Services for Mary Janice Medford Taylor Scroggins, 76, of
Canadian, TX will be at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 25, 2014
at the Church of Christ with Delbert McLoud, offciating and
Shane McLoud, assisting. Burial will follow in Edith Ford
Memorial Cemetery in Canadian under the direction of Hughs
Funeral Home of Canadian, TX.
Janice passed away Saturday, March 22, 2014 in Cana-
dian, TX.
Janice was born July 5, 1937, in Lakeview, TX to the late
Mr. Jared Enoch Medford and Mrs. Nellie Rachel (Ables)
Medford. She attended schools in Borger, TX. At the age of 14 years old, Janice and her
family moved to Borger, where she met and married Thomas James Scroggins at the age of
16 on August 26, 1953 in Stinnett. He preceded her in death on December 1, 1996. They
were happily married for 43 years. They moved to Canadian in 1971 from Borger. She was
also married for a few years to Guy Folley who enriched her later with companionship and
love. He preceded her in death on November 27, 2013. Janice was a wonderful wife, mother,
grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, daughter and granddaughter. As a child she loved to
fsh and swim. She was a seamstress and one of the best cooks in the county. Janice was a
well-known Texas artist whose oil and pastel paintings have been displayed in universities,
museums, art shows and she was a member of the Sagebrush Painters of Canadian. She was
preceded in death by two sisters and two brothers.
She is survived by two sons, Tommy Scroggins and wife Janice of Canadian, TX; T.J.
Scroggins and wife Janice of Lubbock, TX; one daughter, Tammye O’Neal and husband Ron
and Canadian, TX; four brothers, Emmett Lee Taylor and wife Shirley of Duncan, OK; Jarron
Medford and wife Carol of Kemp, TX; John Mike Taylor and wife Sue of Conyers, GA; Terry
Joe Taylor and wife Janet of Bonham, TX; fve sisters, Betty Ann McLoud and husband Del-
bert of Amarillo, TX; Vonzell Barbour and husband David of Duncan, OK; Lisa Elledge and
husband Danny of Athens, TX; Debra Faulk and husband Kel of Athens, TX; Rhonda Ford
and husband Dewayne of Granbury, TX; 8 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren; several
nephews, nieces, cousins and many friends.
The family suggests memorials to Edward Abraham Memorial Home, 803 Birch St., Cana-
dian, TX 79014. You may send condolences online at www.hughsfuneralhome.com.
J.R. Elton Triplett was born December 18, 1926
in Healdton, Oklahoma and died March 21, 2014, at 87 years
of age. J.R. was preceded in death by his mother, Lilly Mae
and his father, Lawson Triplett; sisters, Lucille and Mable;
brothers, Loys (Buck), Elzie (Doc) and Kenneth.
J.R. began school in Tishomingo, Ok and the family moved
to Olustee, Ok when he was in the third grade. He grew up
loving hunting and fshing.
In June 1945, J.R. entered the Army and received training
at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas and Camp Maxey at Paris, Texas.
He served in Pacifc Theater of Operations. His unit, the 46th
Engineers Construction Battalion arrived in Yokohama Harbor and was sent to Sendai, Japan.
Later they were sent to Tokyo to help with reconstruction. His decorations and citations in-
clude Asiatic-Pacifc Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal and Army of Occupation
Medal.
After getting out of the Army he went back to Altus and worked for Wilson and Co. In
1951, he married Elsie Cain and they continued to live in Altus. In 1955, Elsie and J.R. moved
to Fritch, Texas, where he went to work for Natural Gas Pipeline Company. In December
1955 their daughter, Sheila Yvonne was born. Elsie died in 1956.
In 1957, J.R. married Jewell Lookadoo of Fritch who had two children, Linda and Frank.
Jewell also work for Natural Gas and they both continued to work there until they retired.
Jewell and J.R. were married for 53 years until her death on January 26, 2011. J.R. and Jewell
made a great team as community and church volunteers. There was never a job too big or too
small for them to tackle. If there was a need within the community of Fritch, they were there
to lend a hand. In 1994, Jewell and J.R. were chosen by KVII Channel 7 television in Ama-
rillo as members of their “Seven Who Care” volunteer team. These volunteers were chosen
from a list submitted by members of their community. J.R. had a high energy level and with a
hammer, nails and saw could build almost anything any organization needed.
J.R. is survived by his daughters, Sheila Mick and her husband, Terry of Briscoe, TX and
Linda Lookadoo of Fritch; also his son, Frank Lookadoo and his wife, Mary from Mineola,
TX. He has six living grandchildren and numerous great grandchildren, plus nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral service will be held at 11:00 am Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at Calvary Baptist
Church in Borger. Burial will follow at 12 noon in Memorial Park Cemetery in Amarillo under
the direction of Minton Chatwell Funeral Directors of Fritch. The family will receive guests
on Monday, March 24, 2014 from 6-8 pm at the funeral home in Fritch. Memorials may be
made to Alzheimer’s Association, 1400 Wallace Blvd., Amarillo, TX 79106.
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Betty Lou Deaton, 85, passed away Friday,
March 21, 2014.
Funeral service will be held Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at
2:00 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Borger, Rev. Andy Dietz,
1st Baptist Groom, will offciate. Burial will follow at West-
lawn Memorial Park under the direction of Minton Chatwell
Funeral Directors of Borger.
Betty was born July 10, 1928 in Ada, Oklahoma to Wil-
liam and Beatrice Grisham. She married Verlie Deaton on
June 15, 1946 in Ada, Oklahoma.
She is preceded in death by her parents; brother, Bill Grisham; and two nieces.
Survivors include her husband, V.E. of the home; sons, Gary Deaton and his wife, Edwina
of Oklahoma City, Leslie Deaton and his wife, Diane of Fritch; daughter, Donna Mesneak and
her husband, Jimmy of Fritch; ten grandchildren, Alan and Trayce Mesneak, Aaron Mesneak,
Cindy and Steve Fullbright, Drew and Kandi Deaton, Ben and Jami Deaton, Rachel Deaton;
eleven great grandchildren, Lauren, Andrew, Zach, Carson, Truman, Grace, Isabella, Reese,
Rigby, Barrett and Raylee.
The family will be gathering at 8746 Hwy 136.
April 5
Kiwanis Club of Borger will
host their annual Pancake
Breakfast from 6 am to
noon in the Frank Phillips
College Cafeteria. Take outs
available. Contact Denise
Klotz for more information
at 395-3468
April 10
Hutchinson County Health
Fair, 9 am to 2:30 pm at
the Frank Phillips BCAC,
1301 W. Roosevelt St., Free
admission, fasting blood
sugar screenings starting at
8:30 am
April 10-12
Friends of the Library will
hold the semi-annual book
sale at the Bogrer Library.
Hours are Thursday 4:00-
7:00 for members only,
Friday 10:00-5:00, and
Saturday 10:00-2:00. Half-
year memberships can be
purchased for $5.00 at the
door on Thursday. Current
and new members will be
eligible for a drawing for a
$50.00 gift card to Barnes
and Noble. From 5:30-7:00
Thursday, Joy Lene, author
of Choose You this Day--
Holiday or Holy Day, will
be having a book signing in
the library.
April 28-May 7
American Red Cross Life-
guarding Training Courses,
6 pm - 8:30 pm at the
BCAC. Call Susie Graves
at (806) 878-2537 or (806)
584-6512 for a spot!
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100
S. Hedgecoke, Borger. Call
273-5621 or 857-3947 for
more information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian
Church, 200 S. Bryan, 6
p.m. Call 806-382-2449
or 806-273-6017 for more
information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist
Church Borger Fellowship
Hall 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
child care is provided. Call
FBC 263-5621 for informa-
tion.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medical
Field Employees in Hutchin-
son County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College
Cafeteria in the Gallery
Room For more informa-
tion call Aileen Jackson at
274-9890or Betty Jordon at
857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Pres-
byterian Church, 418 W.
Coolidge, 8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more
information.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, sec-
ond foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6
p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you
write poetry and want to
connect with other poets to
connect with other poets,
read and get positive feed-
back we would like to form
a lunch group and/or an
evening group. If interested
please call Mary Zan at 857-
3670 for more information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for
life challenges, 6:30 p.m.,
That One Place Community
Center, 212 E. Broadway,
Fritch. Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria Call
274-3321 for more informa-
tion.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9 a.m.
Call 886-0299 for more
information.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stin-
nett Senior Citizen Building,
6:30 p.m. Call 878-2960 or
878-3272 for more informa-
tion.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Ministry,
7 p.m. Call 857-3975 for
location.
Alibates Creek Indian Danc-
ers, 7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran
Church, 212 W. Jefferson.
Call 274-3239 for more
information.
VFW Post #1789 meets at
the VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room, 1 p.m. Call
467-5732 for more informa-
tion.
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings, Op-
portunities Center, 11 a.m.
to noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce,
6:30 p.m. Call 806-878-
4026.
Vietnam Veterans of
America Chapter 404, 403 S
Cornell in Fritch, 5:30 p.m.
dinner and 6:00 meetings.
Call 857-3950 for more
information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure screen-
ings, MAL’S Café, Stinnett,
8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Phillips Alumni Association,
Frank Phillips College Gal-
lery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post 0671
meets at 7:30 pm at the
American Legion post next
to the Aluminum Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art
10:30-12 St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s wel-
come, Doors open 5 pm,
Cards sold starting at 6 p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm,
$14 each packet of 13 games
or 6 papers for each of 13
games,
Additional papers half pack-
ets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more
information.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge, 7:30
p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost
Children Grief Support
Group, New U on Main
Street, 7 p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more
information.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen
Sunshine Club, 12 noon for
lunch followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m., 305 N. Deahl. Call
273-7127 or see fellowship-
borger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
Fritch Sunshine Club, 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Mennonite
Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
United Supermarket, 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class,
10 a.m., Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room. Call 467-5718 or
467-5857 for more informa-
tion.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Call 878-2597 for
more information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor
Home Owners Assoc., 10
a.m., Club House.
Marine Corps League Haw-
thorne Det. #1349, 9 a.m.,
421 E. Broadway, Stinnett.
Young adults Christian
marriage class, Word of Life
Church, 9:45 a.m.Sundays,
Wednesdays, Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcotics
Anonymous, Valley Drive
west entrance, Cedar Street,
7:30 p.m. Call 806-570-
2028 or 857-4038 for more
information
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014
Borger News- Herald
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I’m sure he’ll propose with-
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to his girlfriend in the next
month. They should be able
to enjoy their time and let
all their friends know.
Caleb has always fol-
lowed A.J.’s lead. When A.J.
buys his girlfriend jewelry, I
get jewelry. It makes me feel
like an afterthought and that
the gifts are not sincere.
If Caleb does propose
close to the time that A.J.
does, I’m going to say no.
I don’t want a copycat en-
gagement so my boyfriend
can keep up with his best
friend. Please advise. --
COMING IN SECOND IN
NEW YORK
DEAR COMING IN
SECOND: You appear to
be frustrated because your
boyfriend has a recessive
personality and is a fol-
lower. It is unlikely that he
is going to change. Frankly,
Caleb doesn’t appear to be
mature enough to be mak-
ing decisions with lifelong
consequences. You might be
much happier with someone
who is his own man.
DEAR ABBY: A year and
a half ago, my doctor diag-
nosed me with ADHD. The
medication I take is a stimu-
lant and it curbs my appetite.
I take it before school and it
wears off by mid-afternoon.
Because of this, I don’t feel
hungry at lunchtime.
My teachers and school-
mates have noticed. They try
to persuade me to eat, but I
tell them I had a big break-
fast or I’m just not hungry.
I know they mean well,
but I want them to under-
stand that I’m not anorexic.
I don’t want them to know
I have ADHD because some
of them make fun of people
who do. Do you have any
suggestions? -- ANONY-
MOUS IN IOWA
DEAR ANONYMOUS:
The principal of your school
should be told that you are
on doctor-prescribed medi-
cation that suppresses your
appetite so that informa-
tion can be shared with the
teachers who supervise the
cafeteria. That way you will
receive less pressure to eat
from the adults. Your class-
mates do not have to know.
If someone accuses you
of being anorexic, just say
that your doctor has told you
your weight is normal. It’s
a shame they would tease
someone who has ADHD
because it’s a condition that
so many students and adults
share. However, because
you feel it would make you
a target, you’re wise to say
nothing.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band is an only son. His
mother lives an hour from
us. I love her dearly, but
when she calls to let us know
she’s coming to visit on any
given Saturday, she won’t
give us a time of her ar-
rival. She says she “doesn’t
want to be bound by time”
because she runs a lot of er-
rands while she’s here.
She doesn’t appear to
notice the inconvenience
to me and my active fam-
ily, who are bound to our
house the entire day, wait-
ing for her to show up. My
husband brushes it off, but it
frustrates me. How should I
handle this in a kindly man-
ner? -- STILL WAITING IN
TEXAS
DEAR STILL WAITING:
The next time your mother-
in-law calls, ask her when
she plans to be at your house
because you have errands to
run, too. When she says she
doesn’t want to be bound by
time, ask her to call you on
your cellphone and let you
know when she’s done with
her errands and you’ll meet
her at the house. That way,
none of you are tied down or
inconvenienced.
Copycat Boyfriend Gets Some Growling From His Girlfriend
Dear Abby
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
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15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
Save the date on your
calendar for Thursday,
April 10, for the annual
County-wide Health Fair.
The Health Fair will be
held on the Frank Phil-
lips College Campus in
the Borger Community
Activity Center. A move
is being made in the loca-
tion to allow more space
for increased informa-
tion and screenings to be
presented. The hours for
this year’s Health Fair
will start at 8:30 a.m. with
fasting blood draws and
the remainder of the ex-
hibits open from 9:00 a.m.
until 2:30 p.m. The Health
Fair provides an opportu-
nity to gain, not only free
health and wellness infor-
mation, but to participate
in free health screenings.
An added feature to the
Health Fair this year will
be a number of outside ex-
hibits including Electrical
Safety, Teens in the Driver
Seat, Drunk Driving Simu-
lation, and Child Car Seat
Restraint Safety Checks.
The committee includ-
ing Golden Plains Com-
munity Hospital, Frank
Phillips College, Borger
Police Department, Borg-
er Chamber of Commerce
and Texas Agri Life Ex-
tension Service – Hutchin-
son County, has worked to
bring information to reach
all age groups with exhib-
its and demonstrations and
information.
Of special interest for
families with infants or
young children will be
the Car Seat Restraint
Safety Checks. Appoint-
ments must be made in
advance for this service at
the Health Fair. Call the
County Extension Offce
at 878-4026 to book your
time for this service.
Watch for more infor-
mation over the coming
weeks with specifcs on
others who will be fea-
turing information and
screenings to help insure
a healthier Hutchinson
County.
Save the date for the upcoming
Hutchinson County Health Fair
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014
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TODAY IN HISTORY
708 – Pope Constantine
succeeds Pope Sisinnius as
the 88th pope.
1199 – Richard I is
wounded by a crossbow bolt
while fghting France, lead-
ing to his death on April 6.
1555 – The city of Valen-
cia is founded in present-day
Venezuela.
1584 – Sir Walter Ra-
leigh is granted a patent to
colonize Virginia.
1634 – The frst settlers
arrive in Maryland.
1655 – Saturn’s largest
moon, Titan, is discovered
by Christiaan Huygens.
1802 – The Treaty of
Amiens is signed as a “De-
fnitive Treaty of Peace” be-
tween France and the United
Kingdom.
1807 – The Slave Trade
Act becomes law, abolishing
the slave trade in the British
Empire.
1807 – The Swansea
and Mumbles Railway, then
known as the Oystermouth
Railway, becomes the frst
passenger carrying railway
in the world.
1811 – Percy Bysshe
Shelley is expelled from the
University of Oxford for
publishing the pamphlet The
Necessity of Atheism.
1865 – American Civil
War: In Virginia, Confeder-
ate forces temporarily cap-
ture Fort Stedman from the
Union.
1894 – Coxey’s Army,
the frst signifcant Ameri-
can protest march, departs
Massillon, Ohio for Wash-
ington D.C.
1911 – In New York City,
the Triangle Shirtwaist Fac-
tory fre kills 146 garment
workers.
1914 – Aris is founded in
Thessaloniki.
1917 – The Georgian Or-
thodox Church restores its
autocephaly abolished by
Imperial Russia in 1811.
1918 – The Belarusian
People’s Republic is estab-
lished.
1924 – On the anniver-
sary of Greek Independence,
Alexandros Papanastasiou
proclaims the Second Hel-
lenic Republic.
1931 – The Scottsboro
Boys are arrested in Alabama
and charged with rape.
1947 – An explosion in a
coal mine in Centralia, Illi-
nois kills 111.
1948 – The frst success-
ful tornado forecast predicts
that a tornado will strike
Tinker Air Force Base,
Oklahoma.
1949 – The extensive de-
portation campaign known
as March deportation is
conducted in Estonia, Lat-
via and Lithuania to force
collectivisation by way of
terror. The Soviet authori-
ties deport more than 92,000
people from the Baltics to
remote areas of the Soviet
Union.
1957 – United States
Customs seizes copies of
Allen Ginsberg’s poem
“Howl” on the grounds of
obscenity.
1957 – The European
Economic Community is
established (West Germa-
ny, France, Italy, Belgium,
Netherlands, Luxembourg).
1958 – Canada’s Avro
Arrow makes its frst fight.
1965 – Civil rights ac-
tivists led by Martin Luther
King, Jr. successfully com-
plete their 4-day 50-mile
march from Selma to the
capitol in Montgomery, Ala-
bama.
1969 – During their hon-
eymoon, John Lennon and
Yoko Ono hold their frst
Bed-In for Peace at the Am-
sterdam Hilton Hotel (until
March 31).
1971 – Bangladesh Lib-
eration War: Beginning of
Operation Searchlight by
the Pakistani Armed Forces
against East Pakistani civil-
ians.
1971 – The Army of the
Republic of Vietnam aban-
don an attempt to cut off the
Ho Chi Minh trail in Laos.
1975 – Faisal of Saudi
Arabia is shot and killed by
a mentally ill nephew.
1979 – The frst fully
functional space shuttle or-
biter, Columbia, is deliv-
ered to the John F. Kennedy
Space Center to be prepared
for its frst launch.
1988 – The Candle dem-
onstration in Bratislava is
the frst mass demonstra-
tion of the 1980s against
the communist regime in
Czechoslovakia.
1990 – The Happy Land
fre was an arson fre that
kills 87 people trapped in-
side an illegal nightclub in
the New York City borough
of The Bronx.
1992 – Pakistan national
cricket team won the 1992
Cricket World Cup frst time
in the history of cricket, Fi-
nal was played at Melbourne
Cricket Ground .
1992 – Cosmonaut Ser-
gei Krikalev returns to Earth
after a 10-month stay aboard
the Mir space station.
1993 – Warrington Bomb
victim Tim Parry dies fve
days after the IRA bomb
detonated in Warrington,
Cheshire on 20 March 1993
in the second of the War-
rington bomb attacks.
1995 – WikiWikiWeb,
the world’s frst wiki, and
part of the Portland Pattern
Repository, is made public
by Ward Cunningham.
1996 – An 81-day-long
standoff between the anti-
government group Montana
Freemen and law enforce-
ment near Jordan, Montana,
begins.
1996 – The European
Union’s Veterinarian Com-
mittee bans the export of
British beef and its by-prod-
ucts as a result of mad cow
disease (Bovine spongiform
encephalopathy).
2006 – Capitol Hill mas-
sacre: A gunman kills six
people before taking his own
life at a party in Seattle’s
Capitol Hill neighborhood.
2006 – Protesters de-
manding a new election
in Belarus, following the
rigged Belarusian presiden-
tial election, 2006, clash
with riot police. Opposition
leader Aleksander Kozulin
is among several protesters
arrested.
The stillest water at
greatest depth has much in
common with a recent re-
tiree at Sul Ross State Uni-
versity in Alpine. Dr. Chet
Sample also runs deep,
having provided exempla-
ry leadership that encour-
aged scholarship ahead of
intercollegiate athletics.
That said, he’s as rare as
a spotless leopard, helping
students focus frst on the
goal of college graduation,
then on athletics. Along
the way, he earned the
respect of EVERYONE--
student athletes, parents,
colleagues, alumni and the
rest—even opponents on
the basketball foor.
On the big canvas of
life, he painted poten-
tial in vivid colors, with
scoreboards and statistics
relegated to the back-
ground….
*****
His 42 years in educa-
tion included almost 40 at
SRSU—20 as both Chair
of the Physical Education
Department and Athletics
Director. He was men’s
basketball coach for fve
years and women’s mentor
for 15, winning or tying
for conference champion-
ships six times.
Sample’s skills were
called into play early
when he directed the tran-
sition from scholarship to
non-scholarship sports two
years after arrival. The Lo-
bos were among the frst in
Texas to compete without
athletic scholarships.
The university’s remote
location complicates trav-
el. The closest opponent is
more than 300 miles away;
some are almost a thou-
sand. Merely arriving at
some destinations should
count for something….
*****
Traveling a million
miles or so provides many
memories, and some
cause Sample to redden
on the retelling. Arriving
in Stephenville with his
women’s team well after
the midnight hour, he dis-
tributed motel room keys,
wearily urging them to
retire immediately, hop-
ing they could be as fresh
as possible for tournament
play a few hours later.
He hastened to his
room, frst removing con-
tact lenses from tired eyes.
Feminine voices, laugh-
ter and general revelry in
the adjoining room made
sleeping impossible. Rap-
ping on the wall didn’t
help, so he slipped on his
clothes and knocked on
their door. Explaining the
cow’s methodology in
cabbage-eating, he made it
clear that the girls should
begin the quiet game im-
mediately, and they did.
Hours later at break-
fast, the same girls were
seated at the next table.
Their voices were famil-
iar, but their faces weren’t.
Oh, how he wished his
contacts had been in place
when he’d threatened them
earlier. Turns out they were
members of another team
from another university….
*****
Proof positive of his
commitment to academ-
ic excellence came with
his recommendation that
grade point minimums be
INCREASED for athletes.
It was so ordered, much to
the delight of the faculty.
The requirement that
players take their classes
seriously worked. Thus,
SRSU student athletes earn
the right to play sports.
Some 40 graduates of his
programs now have doc-
toral degrees. Hundreds
more are teaching and
coaching.
Several years ago, he
underwent a medical pro-
cedure performed by one
of his former students….
*****
Born in Athens and
a graduate of Seminole,
TX, High School, the 6-3
Sample was an all-state
selection in basketball.
At Wayland Baptist Uni-
versity, he made NAIA
All-District three years--
once was named an NAIA
All-American—and set a
school career scoring re-
cord of 1,726 points.
Following graduation
there, he served two years
in the US Army before be-
coming a men’s basketball
graduate assistant while
completing his master’s
degree at SRSU. He re-
ceived his doctorate at
East Texas State Univer-
sity in 1975.
No one in Alpine is
more respected than this
man whose values, goals,
integrity and character are
beyond reproach….
*****
Sample has received a
ton of honors, and with his
wife, Belinda, has initiated
a number of endowments
throughout the university.
He’s served as scout-
master and as a board
member of both AISD and
the Wesley Foundation.
Sample has been a Lions
Club member for more
than 30 years.
Dr. and Mrs. Sample are
members of Alpine United
Methodist Church. She is
a former SRSU student
and was payroll supervisor
there for 25 years. Their
children, Michael of Aus-
tin and Denise Dusek of
Wall, are SRSU graduates,
and grandchildren Jake,
14, and Melanie, 9, say
they’re SRSU bound….
*****
He’s been my friend for
30 years; I admire no one
more.
The Samples plan to re-
main in Alpine, helping as
they can as volunteers.
Students won’t fnd
Sample’s name in the
catalog. He’s listed in the
phone book, however.
He’ll help them “do life.”
Dr. Chet Sample is as good
as it gets….
*****
Dr. Newbury is a speak-
er in the Dallas/Fort Worth
Metroplex. Speaking in-
quiries/comments to: new-
bury@speakerdoc. com.
Phone: 817-447-3872.
Website: www.speakerdoc.
com. Twitter: @donnew-
bury.
Coaching Beyond the Game
Don Newbury
The Idle American
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
You can get a lot done
working behind the scenes
today, because you’re willing
to think big. Your secret is that
you know how to get things
done through others.
TAURUS (April 20 to May
20)
You will be effective when
talking to others in group
situations today. In particular,
you will enjoy participating
with charitable organizations or
in efforts to help those in need.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Work-related travel might
expand your world today.
Authority fgures see you as a
big thinker; they also see you as
successful and affuent.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
Grab every opportunity for
further education or training
today, because it might just
come your way. This is a good
day to pursue opportunities in
publishing, the media, medicine
and the law.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
You couldn’t pick a better day
to settle disputes about shared
property, insurance matters and
inheritances. People are willing
to be generous and bighearted.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
All relations with others will
go well today because people
feel upbeat and happy. You’re
keen to make big plans with
someone, perhaps future travel?
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Work-related travel is likely
today. Whatever happens will
sharpen your mind or open up
new avenues of information.
Legal matters are favored.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov.
21)
You will love mind games and
short trips today, because you
feel playful and prankish. Enjoy
sports events and fun times
with children. New love with
someone successful is possible.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21)
This is a great day to entertain
at home or to have family
discussions about the future.
People are happy to share their
ideas and willing to take a risk.
Any gathering at home will be
positive.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to
Jan. 19)
This is a great day for you
because you are full of positive
ideas and willing to take a
chance. You might meet new
faces from strange places.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18)
Business and commerce
are favored today. Trust your
moneymaking ideas. Travel
related to your job is likely. It’s
a good day for signing contracts
plus buying and selling.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20)
This is a great day to make
plans for the future and create
organizational systems. Your
view of the world is powerful,
positive and optimistic. A
winning combo!
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014
Borger News- Herald Comics
5
Borger News- Herald
Sports
6
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
AMARILLO, Texas - The
Amarillo Venom, the de-
fending Lone Star Football
League champions, main-
tained their red hot momen-
tum as they made easy work
of the LEXFA All-Stars of
Mexico City at the Cal Far-
ley Coliseum of the Ama-
rillo Civic Center on March
23 by a score of 109-31.
Both squads started off the
game with a see-saw battle
as Amarillo drew frst blood
from a rushing touchdown
from fullback Undra Hen-
drix, before yielding
a blocked
PAT
at-
tempt
by Joe Miguel
Luna Guidimin which
gave the Venom a 6-0 lead.
The All-Stars would keep
that momentum going, as a
pass from LEXFA quarter-
back Brian Guillermo San-
chez Gomez connects with
wide receiver Raul Mateos
for an early lead at 7-6.
However, the rest of the frst
quarter saw the Venom take
control with 17 unanswered
points from capitalizing on
stalled LEXFA drives. These
stalled drives would culmi-
nate from a wide receiver DJ
Beshears touchdown recep-
tion from quarterback Bren-
dan Crawford, a Hendrix
touchdown rush and a pick
six from middle linebacker
Ricardo Thompson to give
the Venom a 26-7 lead to
end the frst quarter.
The second quarter saw the
same domination by the
Venom as backup quar-
terback Christian Cafisch
would scamper in for a
touchdown. The All-Stars
kept fghting on, as Gomez
would hook up with wide re-
ceiver Mario Ivan Castelan
for a 33-13 score with less
than 11 minutes remaining
in the half.
In reply, the Venom kept up
the pressure, as Beshears
would set up a touchdown
run from fullback/middle
linebacker Shaka Harris
while the defense would
force a safety to stretch the
lead to a 41-13 lead. Ama-
rillo would continue to score
points left and right, using
a LEXFA fumble to set up
an elaborate three-way pass
connection between Ca-
fisch, Hendix and Beshears
for a huge touchdown
play. After forcing another
LEXFA turnover off an in-
terception by defensive back
Davon Dace, Cafisch makes
another touchdown
pass to
wide
receiver Raymond
Johnson. Before the half, the
LEXFA All-Stars
would be struck by a stroke
of bad luck as Harris re-
turned a kickoff fumble for a
Venom touchdown, extend-
ing the advantage to 68-13
at the end of the half.
The second half would
sing the same song for both
squads, as stalled drives
and turnovers hampered
the possibility of a LEXFA
comeback. With pick six
from defensive back Mike
Carter off of attempted deep
pass by LEXFA quarterback
Jorge Luis Honorat Poblette,
Amarillo would increase
their lead to 75-13.
Of note, absolute wackiness
occurred as another Venom
interception would turn
into a fumble recovery and
touchdown for the All-Stars,
seeing LEXFA add up to a
19 point tally after missing
the extra point.
To fnish off the game,
the Venom would go on a
roll. Starting with a Har-
ris touchdown scamper,
Johnson added a kickoff
return for touchdown while
a Cafisch-Johnson touch-
down strike and Cafisch
touchdown sprint would
keep the Venom lead strong
at 102-25.
However, the LEXFA All-
Stars would continue to
play for pride, as third string
quarterback Jose Manuel
Ceja De La Rosa would
connect with Castelan for
a touchdown pass while
receiver Jose Fernando
Angeles Sanchez takes a
kickoff from Amarillo kick
Jose Lopez to the house to
cut the LEXFA defcit down
to a 102-31 score.
With a minute remaining,
Thompson would rush in for
the fnal score, sealing the
victory for the
Ama-
rillo
Venom.
Leading the charge
for the home standing Ama-
rillo Venom was Cafisch, as
he recorded four touchdown
passes and rushed for two
more. The Amarillo defen-
sive unit was another huge
factor in the game, forcing
four turnovers and stalled
numerous LEXFA drives.
“We know that we can con-
tinue to get better. We still
have a lot of stuff that we
need to work on,” Amarillo
Venom head coach Julian
Reese said. “I’m happy that
we got the win, but I’m
happy that the guys aren’t
satisfed.”
“It was a good experience
playing an international
team,” Johnson said. “But
once you get in between
those lines, it’s just another
opponent. Regardless of
where they’re from.”
Johnson aided the Venom
cause with two touchdown
receptions and a kickoff
touchdown return.
The LEXFA All-Stars, on
the other hand, were led by
quarterback Brian Guiller-
mo Sanchez Gomez who
brought in two touchdown
passes for the All-Stars,
while Catelan caught two
touchdown passes for the
LEXFA cause.
While the All-Stars enjoyed
their trip to the United
States, they remarked about
how different the style and
atmosphere was compared
to their respective homeland.
Hundreds of Amarillo-area
residents will lace up their
shoes for Walk MS: Ama-
rillo at Caprock High School
on March 29. The goal – to
raise $106,000 to help the
estimated 22,000 Texans
living with multiple sclero-
sis (MS) and their families
served by the National
Multiple Sclerosis Society,
South Central Region.
Walk MS: Amarillo features
a 5K outdoor route and
a half mile indoor route.
Guests will also enjoy live
entertainment and refresh-
ments. For additional
information, log on to www.
walkmstexas.org.
National MS Society repre-
sentatives, volunteers and
participants will be available
for interviews preceding,
during and after the event.
WHEN & WHERE
Sat., March 29, 2014
Caprock High School
3001 E. 34th Ave., Amarillo,
Texas
Site opens at 9 a.m.; Walk
begins at 10 a.m.
WHY
Events like this raise funds
to support MS research
and programs and services
that directly impact indi-
viduals and families living
with the disease. Multiple
sclerosis, an unpredictable,
often disabling disease of
the central nervous sys-
tem, interrupts the fow
of information within the
brain, and between the brain
and body. Symptoms range
from numbness and tingling
to blindness and paralysis.
The progress, severity and
specifc symptoms of MS in
any one person cannot yet
be predicted, but advances
in research and treatment are
moving us closer to a world
free of MS. Most people
with MS are diagnosed
between the ages of 20 and
50, with at least two to three
times more women than
men being diagnosed with
the disease. MS affects more
than 2.3 million worldwide.
About the National Multiple
Sclerosis Society.
MS stops people from
moving. The National MS
Society exists to make sure
it doesn’t. The Society ad-
dresses the challenges of
each person affected by MS
by funding cutting-edge
research, driving change
through advocacy, facilitat-
ing professional education,
collaborating with MS orga-
nizations around the world,
and providing programs and
services designed to help
people with MS and their
families move forward with
their lives. In 2012 alone,
the Society invested $43
million to support more
than 350 new and ongoing
research projects around
the world while providing
programs and services to
more than one million indi-
viduals affected by multiple
sclerosis. The National MS
Society serves more than
68,000 Texans affected by
multiple sclerosis, including
more than 22,000 diagnosed
with the disease. The Soci-
ety is dedicated to achieving
a world free of MS. Join the
movement at www.jointhe-
movment.org.
Early and ongoing treatment
with an FDA-approved ther-
apy can make a difference
for people with multiple
sclerosis. Learn about your
options by talking to your
health care professional and
contacting the National MS
Society at nationalMSsoci-
ety.org or 1-800- 344-4867.
Amarillo Community Joins Together to Support MS
GAME SHOTS FROM THE
BORGER VS. CANYON SOCCER GAME
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014
Borger News- Herald
Community
7
As caring pet owners,
we are typically well aware
of the various dangers that
threaten our furry friends’
safety. Keeping their vac-
cinations up to date, mak-
ing sure they are properly
groomed, and providing
them with the most nutri-
tious food to ensure good
health are just a few things
that we tend to with the
utmost importance. How-
ever, numerous pet-poi-
sonous items commonly
found around our house-
holds are often overlooked
and can be detrimental to
our pets’ lives.
A large variety of house-
hold plants, foods, and
chemicals that are consid-
ered safe for human use are
toxic to our pets. Some of
the most dangerous plants
to keep out of your pets
reach include any fowers
in the lily family, includ-
ing sago palms, oleander,
foxglove, castor bean, and
poinsettias. Though these
are bad for both cats and
dogs, the toxic dose often
differs between species.
“Some of the most
common foods that can be
toxic to dogs are grapes
and raisins, or any food
items containing the ar-
tifcial sweetener xylitol,
which can be contained in
chewing gum as well as
many low-calorie foods
as a sugar substitute,” said
Dr. Medora Pashmakova,
a Clinical Associate Pro-
fessor in emergency and
critical care at the Texas
A&M College of Veteri-
nary Medicine & Biomedi-
cal Sciences. “Chocolate
is also a well-known toxin
to pets; however, it’s par-
ticularly the dark choco-
late and baking chocolate
varieties that pose the real
threats due to their higher
cocoa and theobromine
content.”
Although cats are more
discerning when it comes
to eating household items,
grooming themselves after
coming into contact with
any toxic chemicals can be
very dangerous. “Owners
of cats should be vigilant
about any chemical spills
or even the use of coun-
tertop cleaning products,
which can be caustic when
cats groom themselves af-
ter being in contact,” said
Pashmakova. “In addi-
tion, even small volumes
of ingested antifreeze or
coolant fuid can be lethal
to cats and requires seeing
a veterinarian right away,
without waiting for clini-
cal signs to appear.”
A good rule of thumb is
that if something is toxic
to humans, it is likely toxic
to our pets as well. “At the
same time, medications
considered safe in people
(such as over the counter
pain medications or cold/
fu medications) are NOT
safe for dogs and cats,”
Pashmakova said. “Never
give your dog or cat hu-
man medications without
speaking to a veterinarian
frst.”
Dr. Pashmakova ex-
plains that keeping your
pets safe is similar to
keeping babies safe. This
sometimes includes pet-
proofng your house and
anticipating what cats,
dogs, ferrets, and other
small animals can get into.
“Keeping cupboards se-
cured, bathrooms closed,
bathroom garbage stowed
away, medications locked
up, and any chemical spills
cleaned up quickly and
thoroughly are just some
basics that all pet owners
should keep in mind,” said
Pashmakova. “Having a
good plan of action in the
event of ingestion is also
key.” This can be some-
thing as simple as calling
your veterinarian during
daytime hours or calling
an emergency hospital af-
ter-hours.
If your pet ingests any
of these items, it is best
to play it safe and contact
your veterinarian or the
Animal Poison Control
Center; they can help you
determine if your pet needs
to be seen by a doctor and
if they consumed a toxic
dose. The Texas A&M
Veterinary Medical Teach-
ing Hospital ER is always
available to advise on toxic
ingestions, and the Animal
Poison Control Hotline
affliated with the Univer-
sity of Illinois veterinary
school is a 24/7 resource
with board-certifed toxi-
cologists to advise owners
or veterinarians on how to
deal with toxicities.
There is no harm in be-
ing extra cautious when
dealing with possible tox-
icities around the house.
Be sure to keep these par-
ticular items out of your
pet’s reach at all times, and
to call your veterinarian or
poison control center im-
mediately if they do come
into contact with them. It
is always better to be safe
than sorry when it comes
to the safety of your furry
family member.
Pet Talk is a service of
the College of Veterinary
Medicine & Biomedi-
cal Sciences, Texas A&M
University. Stories can
be viewed on the Web at
vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk.
Suggestions for future top-
ics may be directed to edi-
tor@cvm.tamu.edu. Fol-
low us on Twitter.
PetTalk: Toxic
Household Items
Amarillo Mobile Vet
Center will be at the Hutchi-
son county free health fair
located at Frank Phillips
College BCAC 1301 W.
Roosevelt Borger TX on
April 10, 2014 between the
hours of 9:00 AM and 3:00
PM to provide education
about readjustment coun-
seling services offered at
Vet Centers. All War Zone
Vets qualify for counseling
services. Active duty per-
sonnel and War Zone Vets
with Post Traumatic Stress
Disorder or Military Sexual
Trauma may receive care at
any Vet Center or MVC. We
provide 3 sessions to Non-
War Zone Vets for informa-
tion and referrals. Certain
families of active duty ser-
vice men and women who
have died while on active
duty may qualify for be-
reavement services. Other
services offered include:
Individual, group, and
family readjustment coun-
seling to assist active duty
service members in making
a successful transition from
combat, to garrison, or ci-
vilian life.
Post-traumatic stress
disorder (PTSD) treatment
and help with other related
problems that affect func-
tioning within the family,
work, school or other areas
of everyday life.
Military sexual trauma
counseling for active duty
service members of both
genders.
Service members and
Veterans will be required to
provide documentation by
their third visit indicating
they have served in a com-
bat or war zone to continue
counseling. A copy of one
of the following documents
will meet this requirement:
DD214, deployment demo-
bilization order, enlisted
record brief, offcer record
brief, or an award citation
indicating service member
served in a combat zone.
These services are also
available to family mem-
bers of active duty combat
service members as well as
family members of combat
Veterans.
For more information
please contact the Amaril-
lo Vet Center, 3414 Olsen
Blvd, Amarillo TX 79109.
Phone: 806-354-9779
In addition to its regular
operating hours Monday-
Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., the Amarillo Vet Cen-
ter has extended hours three
nights a week (Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday)
until 8 p.m.
Amarillo Mobile Vet Center visits
Hutchinson County Free Health Fair in
support of VA2VETS Outreach Initiative
The community wide
health fair will be held
on Thursday, April 10th
and will be a free event
for area residents. This
year’s health fair will fea-
ture several new demon-
strations as well as free
screenings and informa-
tion booths. All are de-
signed to help attendees
have a better understand-
ing about health care and
health and safety prac-
tices.
New demonstrations
will feature a child safety
seat check. The person at-
tending should have their
safety seat in their vehicle
and the installation of the
seat will be checked for
installation accuracy. In
order to take part in this
demonstration, appoint-
ments will be necessary
and may be made by call-
ing the Texas Agri Life
Office at 806-878-4026.
There will also be a limit-
ed number of seats which
will be made available for
free. Participants again,
must call for an appoint-
ment and must have their
vehicle present for instal-
lations of the seat and also
the child who will be oc-
cupying the seat.
Xcel Energy will be
present with the Electrical
Arching Demonstration
which is intended to teach
awareness of electrical
safety. This demonstra-
tion will run at various
times throughout the day.
Teen Texting and Driv-
ing will be a simulated ac-
tivity which will focus on
the dangers of texting and
driving. This is not lim-
ited to teens but to all to
gain an understanding of
the critical dangers of tex-
ting while in the driver’s
seat.
Drunk Driving will be
featured in a simulated
activity to help those par-
ticipating experience the
effects of a drunk driver.
Many booths featur-
ing screenings and health
information will be pro-
vided throughout the day.
The health fair will open
at 8:30 a.m. for fasting
blood draws and will end
at 2:30 p.m. Mark your
calendar and make plans
to attend this informative
day designed to improve
your health and health
and safety knowledge.
Health fair to feature
new demonstrations
Kristly Slough, County Extension Agent, demonstrates
the correct way to install a child safety seat. This service will be available at
the Health Fair, April 10th, by appointment only. Call 806-878-4026 to book a time.
(Washington, D.C.)
March 24, 2014 – The Na-
tional Park Service today
announced that the center-
piece of its 2016 Centen-
nial will be a broad public
engagement campaign to
reintroduce the national
parks and the work of the
National Park Service to a
new generation of Ameri-
cans, inviting them to visit
and get involved. The two-
year effort will begin in
2015 and run throughout
the National Park Ser-
vice’s 100th anniversary
year in 2016. Plans for the
campaign, entitled “Find
Your Park,” are underway
in collaboration with the
National Park Foundation,
the offcial nonproft part-
ner of the National Park
Service.
The National Park Ser-
vice and the National Park
Foundation will team up
with partners to produce
programs, events, and
activities that will drive
broad awareness, deepen
engagement, and increase
support for America’s na-
tional parks, the work of
the National Park Service,
and its partners. In ad-
dition to making all 401
national parks go-to des-
tinations, the campaign
will highlight the historic
preservation and outdoor
recreation work the Na-
tional Park Service does
with communities across
the country and the value
it brings to Americans ev-
ery day.
“We are excited to use
the Centennial to invite
every American to get to
know their national parks
and to understand how
our one hundred years
of conservation experi-
ence translates into on-
the-ground revitalization
projects in their neighbor-
hoods,” said National Park
Service Director Jonathan
B. Jarvis. “Our campaign
will encourage Americans
to ‘Find Your Park’ – to
discover a personal con-
nection to a place or a
story that provides inspira-
tion or enjoyment, and to
then join us in our second
century of stewardship of
America’s most treasured
places.”
“We are proud to sup-
port the National Park
Service in this historic
milestone,” said Neil Mul-
holland, President and
CEO of the National Park
Foundation. “Together,
and in concert with many
partners around the coun-
try, we will set the course
for the next hundred years
with an engaged citizenry
who love their national
parks and proudly show
their support through visi-
tation, volunteerism and
philanthropy.”
Marking the frst phase
of the campaign, the Na-
tional Park Service and
the National Park Foun-
dation unveiled two new
additions to the National
Park Service brand family.
Building off of the Nation-
al Park Service’s iconic ar-
rowhead, the new graphic
identities highlight the
partnership between the
National Park Service and
its Congressionally-char-
tered nonproft partner, the
National Park Foundation.
The arrowhead will con-
tinue to serve as the of-
fcial seal of the National
Park Service. Learn more
about the History of NPS
Visual Identity.
In addition, the National
Park Service and National
Park Foundation both
launched Centennial web
pages today, the start of a
robust communications ef-
fort that will kick into high
gear in early 2015 across
all digital platforms to in-
vite engagement in Cen-
tennial activities.
The National Park
Foundation has retained
Grey New York to develop
the multi-channel pub-
lic engagement campaign
which includes the cre-
ation of strategic partner-
ships with media, corpora-
tions and talent.
To help guide Centen-
nial efforts, Jarvis asked
the National Park System
Advisory Board to create a
Centennial Advisory Com-
mittee made up of 31 mem-
bers representing the broad
spectrum of National Park
Service partners and stake-
holders. The committee is
chaired by Gretchen Long.
For more information
about the National Park
Service’s Centennial, visit
www.nps.gov/centennial
or www.nationalparks.org/
centennial.
National Park Service announces
public engagement campaign
as centerpiece of 2016 centennial
BORGER NEWS-HERALDservice directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Kristie or Mikaela at 273-5611
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
h
e
W
a
t
e
r
H
e
a
t
e
r
B
a
r
g
a
i
n
H
o
u
s
e
HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
C
a
r
t
e
r

s
T
r
e
e
S
e
r
v
i
c
e
Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
NOW Taking Credit Cards!
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
K

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MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
WT Vapors
Great Selection of
eGo-C - Twist
Batteries - Tanks
Atomizers - Vapors
Accessories - Much More!!
722 Weatherly - Borger
www.wtvapors.com
806-274-8874
Like Us On FACEBOOK!!
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
Mon-Fri 9 am to 7 pm
Sat 11 am to 4 pm
806-275-9952
M
u
c
h
M
o
r
e
!
!
A
n
d
M
u
c
h
.
.
.
.
.
APPAREL & TANNING
TATTOOS
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
4106 Georgia St. • Amarillo
David Shannon
806-322-3688 • 806-679-3221
Cars • Harleys • Trucks
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
CAREGIVERS
R
o
o
f
n
g
, C
o
n
c
r
e
t
e
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
o
r
k
,
F
lo
o
r
in
g
a
n
d
m
o
r
e
..
C
a
ll f
o
r
y
o
u
r
e
s
t
im
a
t
e
t
o
d
a
y
!
(8
0
6
) 2
4
0
-
1
7
9
6
V
E
R
D
E
C
O
N
S
T
R
U
C
T
I
O
N
JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
CONCRETE CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE
DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
1/2 Off Security
Deposit
For the Month
of March
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
On 2 & 3
Bedrooms
Apartments!
806-273-2766
The Good Book Says...
Ask and you shall receive, and
He has never let me down! I
am asking God to help me find
an honest financial partner to
recondition homes in the Borger
area. Money is secured by local
real estate. If you or someone you
know would be interested, please
contact: Charles Hogan
(806)395-6245
or email
charleshogan1@sbcglobal.net
HELP WANTED
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
Look No Further than here for
all your service needs!
Check Out our website
www.borgernewsherald.com
DISH NETWORK
JUMP INTO
WHOLE-HOME
ENTERTAINMENT
AUTHORIZED RETAILER
$
19
99
PROMOTIONAL
PRICES START AT
mo
FOR 12 MONTHS
WITH 24-MONTH
COMMITMENT
OFFER ENDS 6/12/14 RESTRICTIONS APPLY. CALL FOR DETAILS
DBS Satellite Your local retailer.
Call Ken Watson (806) 865 - 3877
ALL OFFERS REQUIRE CREDIT QUALIFICATION.
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
420 OTHER CITIES PROP.
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
in this newspaper is sub-
ject to the federal fair
housing act of 1968
which makes it illegal to
advertise “any prefer-
ence, limitation or dis-
crimination based on
race, color, religion,
handicap, family status,
sex or national origin, or
an intention to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any ad-
vertising for real estate
which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in
this newspaper are avail-
able on an equal opportu-
nity basis.
3 BEDROOM house
(806)595-0285 FOR
SALE!!
410 CITY PROPERTY
THE BORGER NEWS-
HERALD SUGGESTS
that its readers take cau-
tion when calling an
area code beginning
with 809 or a prefix of
011. These are interna-
tional toll numbers and
you will be charged inter-
national long distance
rates. For more informa-
tion and assistance re-
garding the investigation
of work at home opportu-
nities and job lists contact
the Better Business Bu-
reau of South Texas, 609
S International Blvd., We-
slaco, TX 78596. (210)
968-3678.
340 APART. RENTALS
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
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2010 GLASTRON GT-180
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$16,500 (806-395-3593)
230 MISC. FOR SALE
COUCH, LOVESEAT,
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(806)857-3257
160 FURNISHINGS
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
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done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
110 WORK WANTED
NEXGEN-PAVING
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Call 806-935-4866
090 HELP WANTED
$ 9 9 S T A R T S
Y O U R P H A R -
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business!
Turnkey system
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& free family
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program.
877-308-7959
X224 www.ben-
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010 SPECIAL
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BNH SPECIAL BNH SPECIAL
Panhandle Gun
& Knife Show
cooïaç /o
9o-çc-
June 7th & 8th
For Booth Information Call 806-273-5611
and ask for Stephanie Hooper!
For Sale: 2 bedroom
Trailer house completely
furnished. Furniture,
appliances, dishes,
linens included. Call
806.654.0832. Lake
Meredith Harbor Bay,
327 Fritch Drive.
Brenntag Southwest, Inc.
806-273-2716
CDL - Truck Driver
Job Description: Brenntag Southwest is currently searching for
a Class A CDL Driver with tanker hazmat endorsements for the
Borger, TX area. Responsibilities include the transportation of
Chemical Containers, the use of forklifts & warehouse equipment,
and maintaining accurate logs & records.
Job Requirements:
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**Brenntag Southwest is an Equal Opportunity Employer**
Borger ISD Transportation
Now accepting applications for
Full and Part-Time
School Bus Drivers
Mechanic/Technicians
Apply www.borgerisd.net
Brierwood Apts.
For Rent
1, 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Castle Dr. Apts.
For Rent
3 bed / 1 bath
Fenced Yard
Call: 273-3982
LABORERS
& SOLDER
TECHNICIANS
NEEDED.
Must have a
mechanical
background,
pass background
screenings & pass
all drug test types.
Apply in person @
115 W. 1st Street -
Fuzzy’s.
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
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Therapist Tech I
$9.07/hr Group Home
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DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
Need a
Part Time
Maintenance
person for a
new 48 unit
apt. complex.
Apply in person
at 400 E. 10th
St., Borger, Tx.
HUGE SHOP
For Sale/Lease
Over 17,000
sq. ft. - Call
806-886-5847
DRIVER OTR NEEDED
Taylor Express Inc in Hope Mills, NC is
recruiting additional drivers from the
Borger, Tx area.
We have a new pay package which pays
practical miles w/benefits and late model
equipment.
Full time, Part time and trainees position
available. Sign on bonus for full time.
For more information contact
Jim at 800-624-5919 x 131 or
Jmcphatter@taylorexpressinc.com
Rentals Available
Large 4 BDR Home
Utilities Included
Contractors
Welcome!
Call
806-273-5557
10
TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014 Borger News- Herald
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Around Town with Don Rice
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Borger Bulldogs Vs. Pampa
7-8
William
Hairston
Conrad Wozniak
Borger Vs. Pampa fnal score 7-0
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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