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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

March 17, 2014

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Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Wesley
Carlock
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
“Painting is just
another way of keeping
a diary.”
Pablo Picasso
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Sports
Pictures
Service Directory
Classifeds
Around Town
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Phone scams targeting
Hutchinson County
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
Like us on Facebook for breaking
news and the latest sports scores!
Don’t
Miss
-EarthTalk
-Artwork by
Jenna Hatfield
-Police and Sheriff
reports Inside!
Local artist shows work at the News-Herald
Jenna Hatfeld, of Borger,
has been painting for years.
She won her frst award in
elementary school and her
winning piece was featured
on the local news station for a
week straight as a backdrop.
Jenna sold her frst paint-
ing in 2009, and since then has
sold over 120 more. Smaller
works, like an 11x14 go for as
little as $50; where her larger
works can fetch hundreds of
dollars.
Jenna sells most of her
work through her Other Side
Artwork Facebook page,
at www.facebook.com/
othersideartwork
“I used to sell a lot through
eBay and etsy, but now I stick
to Facebook and people can
contact me directly.”
Her distinctive abstract
and impressionistic work fas-
cinates viewers, and her use
of contrasting light levels and
colors immediately seizes the
eye. Jenna says her major
infuences are Pablo Picasso
(Of course, she says, every-
body likes Picasso), Salva-
dor Dalí, and more modern
Natasha Westcoat.
She uses “lots of color;
different combinations and
abstract shapes,” and also
says the Golden Ratio of-
ten appears in her work. The
Golden Ratio, 1:1.61, is a con-
cept that appears in nature has
been studied in mathematics
as far back as Euclid. People
often fnd objects conforming
to the Golden Ratio to be aes-
thetically pleasing.
“I want to bring emotion
to dull and mundane spaces,”
she says, “I just want people
to be happy when they see my
work.” ... but my husband is
in a Black Metal band, I have
my dark heart side as well.”
Jenna spends around 30
hours per week painting.
“Usually at night,” she says,
“I’m a stay at home mom,”
and she hopes to someday
open her own gallery. She is
currently planning to paint a
series on the many industrial
facilities around town - es-
pecially Agrium and the car-
bon black plants. See more
of Jenna’s work on the back
page, Community, page 10!
The holiday season is
over for a while and the
seasonal surge of scams
has subsided, but not
completely. Opportunists
and criminals are active
all year long, and citi-
zens should not lose their
vigilance. Phone scams
occur all year long.
Nell Schuster told the
News-Herald today that
she had been contacted
multiple times over the
weekend by men claiming
to be representatives of
the Publisher’s Clearing
House who told her she
had won large amounts
of money. The men told
her that she had been
selected to receive mil-
lions of dollars - she just
needed to send $400 for a
processing fee and $195
for a delivery charge via
Western Union.
“If they have millions
of dollars, why are they
charging fees? Or why
wouldn’t they just take it
out of what they are giv-
ing you?” asked Captain
Anthony Griffn, Assis-
tant Chief of the Borger
Police Department. “If
they ever ask for money
- especially up front - it’s
a scam,” he said.
Schuster was astute
enough not to fall for the
men’s tricks. She was
able to get return phone
numbers and kept the
men running in circles
thinking they could fool
her into giving up the
money. Schuster contact-
ed the Publisher’s Clear-
ing House who told her
that the phone calls were
“absolutely not true.”
Criminals bank on the
hopefulness or naiveté
of the people they con-
tact. The greatest defense
against scam artists is to
think critically and be ex-
tremely skeptical of any-
one offering something
‘too good to be true.’
“Especially with these
lottery winners,” said
Griffn, “frst of all, did
you even enter a lot-
tery?”
The News-Herald was
also recently contacted
by a woman who said
she received a phone call
from a young man who
called her “grandma.”
“I knew it wasn’t my
grandson. I know their
voices and none of them
ever call me ‘grandma.’”
Captain Griffn ex-
plained that often, crim-
inals will call elderly
people in hopes of con-
fusing them and tricking
them into thinking a fam-
ily member needs help.
“‘Hey, it’s your grand-
son, I need help, I need
money; I’m in jail,’ that
sort of thing,” said Grif-
fn.
Also be wary of any-
one asking for payments
to be sent stricty by West-
ern Union. Griffn said
that Western Union ser-
vices are untraceable and
criminals often prefer to
use the service instead of
more problematic debit
and credit card services.
“Again, if they ever
ask for money - it’s a
scam. And requesting
personal information -
never give them personal
information. It’s a scam,”
warned Griffn.
Metro Images
JC Cortez
Editor
editor@borgernewsherald.com
Local artist Jenna Hatfeld with some of her paintings. See more of Jenna’s work on
Community Page 10! - Photo by Don Rice
Sponsored By: Golden Plains Community
Hospital - 100 Medical Dr,
Borger, TX 79007 - (806) 467-5700
DAILY GOOD DEED
Pick up
five pieces of
litter
Local Weather
Tue
3/18
60/31
Generally sunny despite a few af-
ternoon clouds. High around 60F.
Wed
3/19
62/39
Mainly sunny. Highs in the low 60s
and lows in the upper 30s.
Thu
3/20
79/47
Mainly sunny and windy. Highs in
the upper 70s and lows in the up-
per 40s.
Fri
3/21
66/36
More clouds than sun. Highs in the
mid 60s and lows in the mid 30s.
Sat
3/22
58/34
Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper
50s and lows in the mid 30s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content
Service
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 66, 10 Pages
Tuesday, March 18 2014
JC Cortez
Editor
editor@borgernewsherald.com
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2
Local Weather
An early morning cold front is going to put an end to our above average
temperatures. Unfortunately, it’s not going to take away our strong winds
which will continue to blow from the northwest at north at 20-30 mph. Despite
the sunshine, high temperatures will only manage to make the climb into the
upper 50s by late day.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Alyssa Pawlak
No obituaries were
submitted for today’s edition
of the Borger News-Herald
SHERIFF OFFICE REPORT
· 3-13-14 Bradley Mansel Scales was arrested on felony warrant #11189
– criminal negligent homicide
·3-13-14 Deputies were dispatched to a reckless driver on Fairlanes boulevard
in Borger where Alejandro Aviles was arrested for driving while license invalid
·3-13-14 Deputies responded to a theft call on county road O near Stinnett
·3-14-14 Paul Thomas Corbin was arrested for Aggravated sexual assault of a
child and injury to a child. Corbin also had a warrant out of Potter county.
·3-14-14 Terra Lashea Corbin was arrested for injury to a child by omission
·3-14-14 Deputies responded to a theft call on Circle Back dr. in Fritch
·3-14-14 Deputies responded to a criminal mischief call on Boat Ramp in
Fritch
·3-14-14 Deputies responded to a theft call on Ranch road in Fritch
·3-15-14 Deputies responded to a burglary call on Premier road in Borger
·3-15-14 Deputies responded to a disturbance on Morse avenue in Stinnett
·3-16-14 Deputies responded to assist another agency with a traffc stop on
HWY 136 north of Stinnett
·3-16-14 Deputies responded to assist another agency with a residential alarm
on south Cedar in Borger
·3-16-14 Deputies responded to a criminal mischief call on Clubhouse drive
in Borger
·3-16-14 Deputies responded to a criminal trespass call on Spring Creek road
near Borger
The community wide
health fair will be held on
Thursday, April 10th and
will be a free event for
area residents. This year’s
health fair will feature sev-
eral new demonstrations
as well as free screenings
and information booths.
All are designed to help
attendees have a better un-
derstanding about health
care and health and safety
practices.
New demonstrations
will feature a child safety
seat check. The person at-
tending should have their
safety seat in their vehicle
and the installation of the
seat will be checked for
installation accuracy. In
order to take part in this
demonstration, appoint-
ments will be necessary
and may be made by call-
ing the Texas Agri Life
Offce at 806-878-4026.
There will also be a limit-
ed number of seats which
will be made available for
free. Participants again,
must call for an appoint-
ment and must have their
vehicle present for instal-
lations of the seat and also
the child who will be oc-
cupying the seat.
Xcel Energy will be
present with the Electrical
Arching Demonstration
which is intended to teach
awareness of electrical
safety. This demonstra-
tion will run at various
times throughout the day.
Teen Texting and Driv-
ing will be a simulated ac-
tivity which will focus on
the dangers of texting and
driving. This is not lim-
ited to teens but to all to
gain an understanding of
the critical dangers of tex-
ting while in the driver’s
seat.
Drunk Driving will
be featured in a simulated
activity to help those par-
ticipating experience the
effects of a drunk driver.
Many booths featur-
ing screenings and health
information will be pro-
vided throughout the day.
The health fair will open
at 8:30 a.m. for fasting
blood draws and will end
at 2:30 p.m. Mark your
calendar and make plans
to attend this informative
day designed to improve
your health and safety
knowledge.
Health Fair to feature
new demonstrations
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
Relay For Life of
Hutchinson County’s team
Lowe’s Grocery Borger
will be holding a Frito Pie
sale from 5 to 7 p.m. on
Friday, March 21 at the
store in Borger.
A delicious, hot, steamy
Frito pie and cold bottle of
water is only $3. Brown-
ies, cookies and rice crispy
treats will be available for
50 cents each.
All proceeds from the
sale benefts the American
Cancer Society via Relay
For Life of Hutchinson
County.
For more information
about Relay For Life of
Hutchinson County, con-
tact 2014 RFL co-chairs
Judy Allen at 806-674-
6460 or Traci Howell at
806-341-6899. For infor-
mation on forming a team
for the 2014 Relay For
Life of Hutchinson Coun-
ty or joining a team, please
contact team chair Jessica
Muro at 806-395-0631.
Relay For Life of
Hutchinson County will
be held from 7 p.m. to 7
a.m., on Friday, June 27
and Saturday, June 28,
2014 at Huber Park in
Borger, TX.
RFL Team Lowe’s Grocery, Borger
to hold Frito Pie fundraiser
BULLDOG STORAGE
SALE
Content of spaces of following tenants:
Holly Salinas
#
27, 218 Garrett, Borger Tx 79007
Auburn Langen/Nathan Rodriguez
#
114, P.O. BOX 424, Stinnett Tx
79083 Rhonda Dickens
#
85, 138 Wilshire, Borger Tx 79007
Manny Monarez
#
105, 424 N. Harvey, Borger Tx 79007
Bernice Jimenez
#
6, 513 W. Wilson, Borger Tx 79007
When: Saturday, March 22
nd
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Where: 321 W. 5th (Behind Borger Bank)
Submitted
POLICE REPORT
Arrest Report
03.06.14
- Eddy Joe Santana, 46, on four war-
rants
- Kelsey Sharaya Clark, 22, on a
warrant
- Antonio Masha Braziel, 32, for
assault causing bodily injury to a family
member, resisting arrest search or trans-
port MA, and one warrant
- Breana Leann Wilkinson, 19, for
purchasing/furnishing alcohol to a mi-
nor, and assault against a public servant
03.08.14
- Gregory Louis Soto, 27, for as-
sault causing bodily injury to a family
member
- Alex Tyrone Scott, 32, for posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, abd a misc.
city ordinance violation
03.09.14
- Katherine Marie Soto, 25, for
failure to maintain fnancial responsibil-
ity, and displaying expired registration/
license plates
- Juan Heredia Escobar, 24, for fail-
ure to identify and one warrant
- Gina Leigh Stills, 46, on one war-
rant
03.11.14
- Dominico Deshae Carriera, 45, for
unlawfully carrying a weapon, pos-
session of a controlled substance PG 1
>=4G<200G, and four warrants
03.12.14
- Ginger Salinas, 26, for no operator/
driver’s license, and failure to maintain
fnancial responsibility
03.12.14
- Cheyenne Marie Larson, 24, for
public intoxication
Calls for Service
03.06.14
- Thompson for suspicious activity
- Hickory for unauthorized use of a
motor vehicle/auto theft
- W. 1st for report of assault
- Missouri for a hit-and-run accident
- N. Florida for unauthorized use of
a motor vehicle/auto theft
- Stephens for a warrant service
- Harrington for a warrant service
- Borger Shopping Plaza for unau-
thorized use of a motor vehicle/auto
theft
- W. Adams for lost/recovered prop-
erty
- N. Weatherly for a warrant service
- Baker for suspicious activity
- W. Wilson for a hit-and-run ac-
cident
- Harrington for a warrant service
- Weatherly for report of theft
- W. 10th for report of theft
- S. Florida for suspicious activity
- Andress for a disturbance
- N. Main for a warrant service
- E. 10th for criminal mischief
- Huber Park for disorderly conduct
- Carolina for disorderly conduct
- S. McGee for a 911 hangup
- Brown for suspicious activity
- Bennigan’s for a hit-and-run ac-
cident
- Caliche for a disturbance
03.07.14
- Dolomita for shots fred
- College for harassment
- Willowick for a prowler
- Caliche for a prowler
- Whittenburg for harassment
- W. 10th for report of theft
- Hazelwood for a prowler
- Florida for suspicious activity
- Fairlanes for report of theft
- Whittenburg for harassment
- S. Cedar for suspicious activity
- Boyd for a man with a gun
- Phillips Golf Course for shots fred
- N. Florida for report of theft
- Yows for report of theft
- Hitching Rail for a reckless driver
- Hwy 136 & Hwy 1551 for a reck-
less driver
- Moody for harassment
- Loma Linda for a missing person
- Skating Rink for harassment
- Hemlock for report of theft
03.08.14
- W. Coolidge for a disturbance
- Loma Linda for a missing person
- Clayton for disorderly conduct
- Bell for a warrant service
- Elmore for a disturbance
- Cedar & Hwy 1551 for an accident
with injuries
- Hemlock for suspicious activity
Kristly Slough, County Extension Agent, demonstrates the correct way to install a child safety
seat. This service will be available at the Health Fair, April 10th, by appointment only. Call 806-
878-4026 to book a time.
Submitted
March 20
Texas Agrilife Extension
presents Mesh Wreath
Making! 6:30 pm at the
Club Room of the Hutchin-
son County Library in
Borger. $30, All supplies
& dinner will be provided
RSVP to the Extension Of-
fce by March 14th, 2014,
878-4026
Conact: megan.parr@
ag.tamu.edu
March 20
The Hutchinson County
Retired School Personnel
Association will meet at
Frank Phillips College.
Lunch is available at 11:30
in the cafeteria and the pro-
gram will be at 12:30 in the
Gallery Room. Joel Lynch
will present the program
“Political Spectrum”, a
particularly relevant topic
in this election year. All
individuals who are retired
from public schools regard-
less of the position they
held are invited to attend,
learn about the political
situations that affect us,
and enjoy the fellowship.
March 17
Your Decisions Matter
Seminar offered by Friends
of the Library to be held
Monday, March 17, 2014
6:30 p.m. at the Hutchinson
County Library. ques-
tions about important legal
documents to protect your
family will be answered by
three professionals: Kathy
O’Keefe, social worker at
Golden Plains Community
Hospital; James Mosley
attorney at law; and Ste-
phen Horst, fnancial plan-
ner will be there to assist
you in future planning.
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100
S. Hedgecoke, Borger. Call
273-5621 or 857-3947 for
more information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian
Church, 200 S. Bryan, 6
p.m. Call 806-382-2449
or 806-273-6017 for more
information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist
Church Borger Fellowship
Hall 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. child care is provided.
Call FBC 263-5621 for
information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medi-
cal Field Employees in
Hutchinson County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College
Cafeteria in the Gallery
Room For more informa-
tion call Aileen Jackson at
274-9890or Betty Jordon at
857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Pres-
byterian Church, 418 W.
Coolidge, 8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more
information.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, sec-
ond foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6
p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you
write poetry and want to
connect with other poets to
connect with other po-
ets, read and get positive
feedback we would like to
form a lunch group and/
or an evening group. If
interested please call Mary
Zan at 857-3670 for more
information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for
life challenges, 6:30 p.m.,
That One Place Community
Center, 212 E. Broadway,
Fritch. Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria
Call 274-3321 for more
information.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9
a.m. Call 886-0299 for
more information.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stin-
nett Senior Citizen Build-
ing, 6:30 p.m. Call 878-
2960 or 878-3272 for more
information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Minis-
try, 7 p.m. Call 857-3975
for location.
Alibates Creek Indian
Dancers, 7 p.m., Trinity
Lutheran Church, 212 W.
Jefferson. Call 274-3239
for more information.
VFW Post #1789 meets at
the VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room, 1 p.m. Call
467-5732 for more infor-
mation.
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pressure
and blood sugar screenings,
Opportunities Center, 11
a.m. to noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce,
6:30 p.m. Call 806-878-
4026.
Vietnam Veterans of
America Chapter 404, 403
S Cornell in Fritch, 5:30
p.m. dinner and 6:00 meet-
ings. Call 857-3950 for
more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pressure
screenings, MAL’S Café,
Stinnett, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Phillips Alumni Associa-
tion, Frank Phillips College
Gallery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post 0671
meets at 7:30 pm at the
American Legion post next
to the Aluminum Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art
10:30-12 St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s wel-
come, Doors open 5 pm,
Cards sold starting at 6
p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm,
$14 each packet of 13
games or 6 papers for each
of 13 games,
Additional papers half
packets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more
information.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge, 7:30
p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost
Children Grief Support
Group, New U on Main
Street, 7 p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more
information.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen
Sunshine Club, 12 noon for
lunch followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7 p.m.,
305 N. Deahl. Call 273-
7127 or see fellowship-
borger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pressure
and blood sugar screen-
ings, Fritch Sunshine Club,
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Mennonite
Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
United Supermarket, 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class,
10 a.m., Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room. Call 467-5718 or
467-5857 for more infor-
mation.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Call 878-2597 for
more information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor
Home Owners Assoc., 10
a.m., Club House.
Marine Corps League Haw-
thorne Det. #1349, 9 a.m.,
421 E. Broadway, Stinnett.
Young adults Christian
marriage class, Word
of Life Church, 9:45
a.m.Sundays, Wednesdays,
Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcotics
Anonymous, Valley Drive
west entrance, Cedar Street,
7:30 p.m. Call 806-570-
2028 or 857-4038 for more
information
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18, 2014
Borger News- Herald
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MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
Nighttime
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3
DEAR ABBY: My 11-year-
old daughter, “Gwen,” just
started middle school. She
makes good grades, but she’s
strong-willed. Do kids grow
up instantly when they start
middle school?
She wants to know if she
can have a boyfriend. I told
her not until she’s 15. Now
she’s firting with girls who
ask her out. I told her to stay
away from them, not because
they are lesbians but because
they are not good girls. They
are always in trouble.
Gwen says I’m too strict,
and if I don’t stop, she will
run away. I adopted her at
birth (it was an open adop-
tion), and she recently asked
me if I am going to place
her for adoption. She was
worried that I would. I am
very concerned that she is
hanging out with the wrong
crowd. Any advice? -- SAN
ANTONIO MOM
DEAR MOM: People do
not grow up “instantly.” I
know individuals who are
immature at 50, and I’m sure
if you think about it, so do
you. From what you have
told me about your daughter,
it’s clear that she is far from
the grown-up she thinks she
is.
If you do not to want
Gwen to date until she is old-
er, that is your prerogative as
her parent. The gender of the
person isn’t the issue.
Because you think she is
hanging out with the wrong
crowd, my advice is to
make sure she is so busy she
doesn’t have time to spend
with them. Involve her in
activities outside of school --
sports, scouting, music or art.
And be sure she knows that
you are her forever mother
and that nothing she could
ever do will lessen your love
for her.
DEAR ABBY: I am a
29-year-old woman who has
just been diagnosed with
multiple sclerosis. It has
been a rough road, and I’m
lucky to have such a support-
ive group.
My issue is, when people
fnd out, I get comments
such as, “Wow, you look so
GOOD!” or suggestions on
how I should “cure” my MS.
The most hurtful one was
that it’s all in my head.
While I appreciate that
folks care and want to offer
help, I fnd their comments
offensive and hurtful. How
do I respond tactfully, but
also convey that they should
think twice before they say
these things? -- UPSET IN
OHIO
DEAR UPSET: If some-
one says you look good, re-
spond as you would to any
other compliment -- say
thank you. When someone
offers a suggestion about
how you can “cure” your-
self, you’ll save yourself a
lot of frustration if you keep
in mind that the person cares
enough about you to try to be
helpful. All you need to do is
smile and say frmly that you
are under a doctor’s care and
are satisfed with the treat-
ment you are receiving.
And, heaven forbid, if
another individual tells you
that your MS is “all in your
head,” remember that just
because a jackass brays does
not mean you have to pay at-
tention.
CONFIDENTIAL TO
MY IRISH READERS: I re-
ceived this Irish prayer from
a reader. I’m sharing it with
you today in honor of St. Pat-
rick’s Day:
Take time to work,
It is the price of success,
Take time to think,
It is the source of power.
Take time to play,
It is the secret of perpetual
youth.
Take time to read,
It is the foundation of wis-
dom.
Take time to be friendly,
It is the road to happi-
ness.
Take time to love and be
loved,
It is the privilege of the
gods.
Take time to share,
Life is too short to be self-
ish.
Take time to laugh,
Laughter is the music of
the soul.
Mom Worries About 11 Year Old Daughter Who Acts Grown Up
Dear Abby
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The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
Save the date on your
calendar for Thursday,
April 10, for the annual
County-wide Health Fair.
The Health Fair will be
held on the Frank Phil-
lips College Campus in
the Borger Community
Activity Center. A move
is being made in the loca-
tion to allow more space
for increased informa-
tion and screenings to be
presented. The hours for
this year’s Health Fair
will start at 8:30 a.m. with
fasting blood draws and
the remainder of the ex-
hibits open from 9:00 a.m.
until 2:30 p.m. The Health
Fair provides an opportu-
nity to gain, not only free
health and wellness infor-
mation, but to participate
in free health screenings.
An added feature to the
Health Fair this year will
be a number of outside ex-
hibits including Electrical
Safety, Teens in the Driver
Seat, Drunk Driving Simu-
lation, and Child Car Seat
Restraint Safety Checks.
The committee includ-
ing Golden Plains Com-
munity Hospital, Frank
Phillips College, Borger
Police Department, Borg-
er Chamber of Commerce
and Texas Agri Life Ex-
tension Service – Hutchin-
son County, has worked to
bring information to reach
all age groups with exhib-
its and demonstrations and
information.
Of special interest for
families with infants or
young children will be
the Car Seat Restraint
Safety Checks. Appoint-
ments must be made in
advance for this service at
the Health Fair. Call the
County Extension Offce
at 878-4026 to book your
time for this service.
Watch for more infor-
mation over the coming
weeks with specifcs on
others who will be fea-
turing information and
screening s to help insure
a healthier Hutchinson
County.
Save the date for the upcoming
Hutchinson County Health Fair
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18, 2014 Borger News- Herald
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Telephone: (806) 273-5611
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the Borger News-Herald or any of its employees.
It didn’t take long after
my husband and I opened our
frst hardware store in 2003
for people to start coming in
and asking us to open in their
neighborhood, too.
By 2009, we had grown
to six Ace Hardware stores
in Baltimore and Washington
DC, with our seventh store
opening in 2010 in Takoma
Park, Maryland. The next
year, Old Takoma Ace Hard-
ware was one of four stores,
out of 4,500 locally owned
and operated Ace Hardware
stores worldwide, to win the
“Coolest Hardware Store”
award from Ace Hardware
Corporation.
We expanded further in
2012, growing from seven
stores to nine with additional
Washington DC and Maryland
locations.
We may own the business,
but we didn’t do this alone.
Our growth would not have
been possible without the help
of our dedicated employees.
Paying fair wages helped
our business grow fast to nine
stores and nearly 200 em-
ployees even as our country
suffered a terrible economic
downturn.
Our starting pay for sales
associates is $10. We know
that gradually raising the
minimum wage from $7.25
to $10.10 an hour makes good
business sense.
Raising pay at the bottom
is good for the bottom line in
key ways:
When employees earn a
decent starting wage, they can
concentrate on their job with-
out continual stress over how
they are going to afford basics
like rent, groceries or transpor-
tation.
Businesses like mine count
on good customer service, and
good customer service de-
pends on employees who are
treated fairly and invested in
our business. Our employees
know we value them, and we
know they value our custom-
ers.
Satisfed customers don’t
just keep coming back them-
selves, they tell their friends
and families about us. Paying
better wages helps us attract
and retain good employees,
increase sales, expand our
business, and hire more em-
ployees.
When the minimum wage
goes up it puts money in the
paychecks of people who
most need to spend it – from
making rent to buying things
they could not afford before
from the grocer, the pharmacy,
the shoe store, the auto repair,
and, yes, the hardware store.
Local businesses depend
on local customers with money
to spend. A higher minimum
wage means more money cir-
culating in our local economy.
Our employees shop at other
businesses, and the employ-
ees of other businesses shop at
our stores. A higher minimum
wage is a boost for our local
tax base as well.
Too many large companies
pay wages so persistently low
that many of their employees
have to turn to food banks or
food stamps and other public
assistance for the most basic
essentials. This means com-
panies that could pay higher
minimum wages, but aren’t,
are being heavily subsidized
by taxpayers.
Moreover, when the mini-
mum wage stays too low, the
gap between companies like
mine that are trying to do the
right thing and the larger com-
panies that are paying as low
as they can, gets greater and
greater. A growing gap makes
it harder for businesses like
mine to compete.
There’s no reason for
businesses to be paying a
minimum wage of just $7.25
an hour – $15,080 a year for
full-time work. After all, that’s
the same minimum wage that
businesses paid in 1950, ad-
justed for infation. This is
2014, not 1950!
Between 1950 and 1968,
the minimum wage increased
in real infation-adjusted val-
ue, giving us stronger ground
to anchor our income ladder to
the middle class.
But since 1968, the mini-
mum wage has been allowed
to lose about a third of its
value, leaving even full-time
workers in poverty and the
rungs of the middle class fur-
ther out of reach for a growing
number of working families.
We need to raise the mini-
mum wage so full-time work-
ers can get out of poverty and
we can rebuild the consumer
demand that drives our econ-
omy.
As a business owner, I sup-
port the proposal to raise the
minimum wage to $10.10 by
2016, and then adjust it annu-
ally to keep up with the cost of
living. Indexing the minimum
wage to the Consumer Price
Index will make wages much
more predictable for busi-
nesses.
Better wages at the bottom
helped my business succeed.
A better minimum wage will
help our nation succeed.
-------------------
Gina Schaefer is the own-
er of A Few Cool Hardware
Stores, a group of nine Ace
Hardware stores in Washing-
ton DC and Maryland.
Can’t build a strong economy on weak minimum wage
TODAY IN HISTORY
1673 – John Berkeley, 1st
Baron Berkeley of Stratton
sells his part of New Jersey
to the Religious Society of
Friends, commonly known as
Quakers.
1741 – New York gover-
nor George Clarke’s complex
at Fort George is burned in an
arson attack, starting the New
York Conspiracy of 1741.
1766 – American Revolu-
tion: The British Parliament
repeals the Stamp Act.
1848 – March Revolution:
in Berlin there is a struggle
between citizens and military,
costing about 300 lives.
1850 – American Express
is founded by Henry Wells
and William Fargo.
1865 – American Civil
War: The Congress of the
Confederate States adjourns
for the last time.
1871 – Declaration of the
Paris Commune; President of
the French Republic, Adol-
phe Thiers, orders the evacu-
ation of Paris.
1874 – Hawaii signs a
treaty with the United States
granting exclusive trade
rights.
1892 – Former Governor
General Lord Stanley pledges
to donate a silver challenge
cup, later named after him, as
an award for the best hockey
team in Canada the Stanley
Cup.
1906 – Traian Vuia fies
a heavier-than-air aircraft for
20 meters at an altitude of
one meter.
1913 – King George I
of Greece is assassinated in
the recently liberated city of
Thessaloniki.
1922 – In India, Mohan-
das Gandhi is sentenced to
six years in prison for civil
disobedience. He serves only
2 years.
1925 – The Tri-State Tor-
nado hits the Midwestern
states of Missouri, Illinois,
and Indiana, killing 695 peo-
ple.
1937 – The New London
School explosion in New
London, Texas, kills 300
people, mostly children.
1937 – Spanish Civil War:
Spanish Republican forces
defeat the Italians at the Bat-
tle of Guadalajara.
1937 – The human-pow-
ered aircraft, Pedaliante, fies
1 kilometre (0.62 mi) outside
Milan.
1938 – Mexico national-
izes all foreign-owned oil
properties within its borders.
1940 – World War II:
Axis Powers – Adolf Hitler
and Benito Mussolini meet at
the Brenner Pass in the Alps
and agree to form an alliance
against France and the United
Kingdom.
1942 – The War Reloca-
tion Authority is established
in the United States to take
Japanese Americans into cus-
tody.
1944 – The eruption of
Mount Vesuvius in Italy kills
26 people and causes thou-
sands to fee their homes.
1945 – World War II:
1,250 American bombers at-
tack Berlin.
1946 – Diplomatic rela-
tions between Switzerland
and the Soviet Union are es-
tablished.
1948 – Soviet consultants
leave Yugoslavia in the frst
sign of the Tito-Stalin split.
1953 – An earthquake hits
western Turkey, killing 250
people.
1959 – President Dwight
D. Eisenhower signs a bill
into law allowing for Hawai-
ian statehood, which would
become offcial on August
21.
1962 – The Evian Ac-
cords end the Algerian War
of Independence, which had
begun in 1954.
1965 – Cosmonaut Alek-
sei Leonov, leaving his
spacecraft Voskhod 2 for 12
minutes, becomes the frst
person to walk in space.
1967 – The supertanker
Torrey Canyon runs aground
off the Cornish coast.
1968 – Gold standard:
The U.S. Congress repeals
the requirement for a gold re-
serve to back US currency.
1969 – The United States
begins secretly bombing the
Sihanouk Trail in Cambodia,
used by communist forces to
infltrate South Vietnam.
1970 – Lon Nol ousts
Prince Norodom Sihanouk of
Cambodia.
1970 – The U.S. postal
strike of 1970 begins, one of
the largest wildcat strikes in
U.S. history.
1971 – In Peru a landslide
crashes into Lake Yanahuani,
killing 200 people at the min-
ing camp of Chungar.
1974 – Oil embargo cri-
sis: Most OPEC nations end
a fve-month oil embargo
against the United States, Eu-
rope and Japan.
1980 – At Plesetsk Cos-
modrome in Russia, 50 peo-
ple are killed by an explosion
of a Vostok-2M rocket on its
launch pad during a fueling
operation.
1989 – In Egypt, a
4,400-year-old mummy is
found near the Pyramid of
Cheops.
1990 – Germans in the
German Democratic Repub-
lic vote in the frst democratic
elections in the former com-
munist dictatorship.
1990 – In the largest
art theft in US history, 12
paintings, collectively worth
around $300 million, are sto-
len from the Isabella Stewart
Gardner Museum in Boston,
Massachusetts.
1992 – In a national ref-
erendum white South Afri-
cans vote overwhelmingly
in favour of ending the racist
policy of Apartheid.
1994 – Bosnia’s Bosniaks
and Croats sign the Washing-
ton Agreement, ending war
between the Croatian Repub-
lic of Herzeg-Bosnia and the
Republic of Bosnia and Her-
zegovina, and establishing
the Federation of Bosnia and
Herzegovina.
1996 – A nightclub fre
in Quezon City, Philippines
kills 162 people.
1997 – The tail of a Rus-
sian Antonov An-24 charter
plane breaks off while en
route to Turkey causing the
plane to crash and killing all
50 people on board and lead-
ing to the grounding of all
An-24s.
Gina Schaefer
Guest Columnist
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Because you feel sympathetic
to the needs of others today,
especially those who are less
fortunate, you might try to help
someone. Be careful that you
don’t give away the farm. You
need to have a healthy self-
interest as well.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
This is a good day for a
heart-to-heart discussion with
someone, because people are
easily mutually sympathetic.
You will listen to others; they
will listen to you.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Not only do you feel
sympathetic to co-workers
today, but someone might want
to help you. You have dreams
and visions about what you
want to achieve. Why not ask
for help?
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
This is a fabulous day for those
involved in creative projects.
It’s also a romantic, playful
day. Some of you will feel
sympathetic to children as well.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
You will welcome the
chance to be among familiar
surroundings and hide at home.
You’re not being antisocial; you
just want downtime to be by
yourself.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
You might spend time
daydreaming and fantasizing
because it’s easy to do this
today. Don’t worry about
wasting time. We all need days
like this.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
If shopping today, resist the
temptation of something that’s
luxurious and elegant but too
expensive. Even though you
appreciate beauty, the bill will
have to be paid.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Today the Moon is in your
sign, dancing with fuzzy
Neptune. This stimulates your
imagination and promotes
artistic creativity. (But you also
might be a sucker for a sob
story.)
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21)
Solitude in beautiful
surroundings will be a
wonderful treat for you today.
You need to give yourself a
chance to catch your breath.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan.
19)
A friend, especially a female,
might need your help today.
Alternatively, you might want to
confde in a female friend.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18)
Relations with bosses,
parents, teachers and VIPs are
sympathetic yet confusing today.
Be clear about what others
expect from you. Repeat back to
them what you think they said.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20)
You have strong escapist
feelings today. (You want to
run away and join the circus.) If
you can travel through books,
flms and movies, you’ll fnd it
gratifying.
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18, 2014 Borger News- Herald Comics
5
Borger News- Herald
Sports
6
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18. 2014
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
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The Borger Adult Soft-
ball league is ready to get
started. All games will be
played on Monday’s, Tues-
day’s, and possibly Thurs-
day’s. They will take place
on the feld behind the Bull-
dog Stadium. They will try
to reschedule any cancelled
games, but it is not guaran-
teed they will be made up.
Teams will be six fe-
males/six males. There will
be a limit on homeruns of
fve. Any homeruns after
your ffth will be counted
as an automatic out. Players
must be on the roster in or-
der to play. A person may fll
in for a player during regu-
lar league games only, any
tournament games must be
played by listed team mem-
ber.
The cost will cover the
Umpires, feld maintenance,
balls, and plaques or t-shirts
for the First place tourna-
ment winners. The cost is
$200.00 per team. Please
contact Demond Daniels at
806-570-2859 or Cory Mon-
roe at 806-340-8502 to get
registered.
Borger Adult Sofball League
The Amarillo Venom
have announced that they are
proud to have Coach Julian
Reese and Toby Tucker host
a weekly Coaches Show at
Joe Daddy’s restaurant every
Thursday from 5:30 to 6 p.m.
The Coaches Show will go
into detail about the week’s
activities from the Ama-
rillo Venom, from games to
player development and fan
interaction.
On every Tuesday, Tucker
and Coach Reese will chat
about the events from the
past week and a preview
into the week ahead for the
Amarillo Venom. They will
also take on phone calls from
fans, have special guests to
the show and provide enter-
tainment to avid listeners.
The show will be broadcast-
ed weekly on 95.7 KARX –
“The Kar”.
Amarillo Venom games
will also be broadcasted on
95.7 KARX – “The Kar”.
Joe Daddy’s is located at
2108 Paramount Blvd. in
Amarillo, and plays host to a
variety of bands every Friday
night along with providing
Happy Hour from 4 to 7 p.m.
on Monday through Friday,
and all day on Saturday and
Sunday along with serving
mouth-watering dishes for
both lunch and dinner.
The Amarillo Venom are a
proud member of the LSFL.
For more information, con-
tact the Amarillo Venom of-
fce at (806) 350-7277.
Amarillo Venom weekly coaches show
SARASOTA, Fla. (AP)
— The Baltimore Orioles
had two games scheduled for
Monday — and didn’t play a
single inning.
Hours after rain can-
celed Baltimore’s 1 o’clock
game against Philadelphia in
Clearwater, the 7 p.m. game
between the Twins and Ori-
oles was washed out.
The second game was
called off not long after Ori-
oles manager Buck Showal-
ter selected Chris Tillman to
be his opening-day starter on
March 31 against the Boston
Red Sox.
Knowing that the rain was
coming, Showalter had Ub-
aldo Jimenez skip the trip to
Clearwater. Instead, the man-
ager sent the right-hander to
Fort Myers to pitch against
Boston minor leaguers. His
line: 3 2-3 innings, two hits,
no runs, seven strikeouts and
two walks.
Jimenez will pitch in the
second game of the season
against the Red Sox.
Brian Matusz and Kevin
Gausman were slated to pitch
against the Twins on Monday
night. But Showalter told
them long before the cancel-
lation that they would instead
throw against Orioles minor
leaguers at the team complex
on Tuesday, a scheduled off
day for the entire team.
Right-hander Steve John-
son will also join the mix. In-
felder Alexi Casilla, who’s
been battling a sore knee,
needs at-bats in his bid to
make the club as a backup
and will participate in the
session.
In other news, Showalter
said outfelder David Lough
won’t play for two days be-
cause of a stiff neck.
Rain washes out Twins-Orioles game
JUPITER, Fla. (AP) —
Giancarlo Stanton hit a three-
run homer off Gonzalez Ger-
men in the sixth inning, and
the Miami Marlins beat the
New York Mets 10-7 Mon-
day to improve to 5-0 against
their NL East rival in spring
training.
Pinch-hitter Reed Johnson
led off the fourth with a home
run against Jose Valverde.
Marlins starter Hender-
son Alvarez struck out fve
in four innings, allowing
one run, three hits and two
walks.
Mets starter John Lannan
pitched 1 2-3 scoreless in-
nings with two strikeouts.
Stanton 3-run homer helps Marlins beat Mets 10-7
Freestyle School of Ka-
rate and MMA will be hold-
ing championships on March
29th at the Community Hall
in Stinnett. The doors open
and registrations begin at
8:00 am. Registration will
close at 9:15 sharp. (abso-
lutely no registration past
9:15 a.m.). The very frst
event will start at 10:00 am.
There will be four differ-
ent events: Breaking Boards,
Weapons, Kata, and Spar-
ring. (Sparring and Kata are
required for all colored belts).
For all ages from 5-15.
Preregistration began
February 26th and WILL end
March 24th. Prices for pre-
registration is $10 per event.
Prices after March 24th and
at the door will be $15 each
event.
You can register with
Master Donald or Mr. Brad
at the dojo. All spectators
5 and over will be $5 at the
door.
Master Donald Stang and student
LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP)
— Bill Self was born in
Edmond, Okla. He played
basketball at Oklahoma
State, and cut his teeth in the
coaching profession at Kan-
sas. He built up programs at
Oral Roberts and Tulsa, and
is now leading the Jayhawks
in their pursuit of another na-
tional championship.
More than just about any-
body, Self appreciates the rise
of hoops in the heartland.
All three of the Sunfower
State’s programs are back
in the NCAA tournament
this year, and all are ninth
seeds or better, led by No.
1 seed Wichita State. There
are three schools from Okla-
homa in the dance. Two from
Nebraska. Two more made it
from Iowa. Saint Louis is in
the feld, too.
Not a bad showing from
America’s breadbasket, those
sparsely populated “fyover
states” that are supposed to
be lean on talent and gener-
ate little buzz from folks on
the coasts.
“Hopefully we’ll pull for
each other,” Self said, “but it
is interesting.”
In some ways it makes
sense. The epicenter of col-
lege basketball, many argue,
resides in Lawrence at the
school where James Nai-
smith and Phog Allen were
not only coaches but also the
game’s inventor and pioneer.
The Jayhawks play home
games in Allen Fieldhouse,
of course, a bastion of bas-
ketball situated at the base of
a hill on Naismith Drive.
But in many ways, the
success of schools such as
Tulsa and Saint Louis makes
little sense.
They don’t have the strong
tradition of Kansas. They
don’t have fertile recruiting
grounds such as Chicago or
the Dallas Metroplex in their
own backyards. All they have
are coaches willing to grind,
fans every bit as zealous as
those of Duke and Kentucky,
and players often overlooked
by those college basketball
blue-bloods who arrive on
campus with a chip on their
shoulders.
The result? Turn on the
tournament this week and
you’ll see Oklahoma against
North Dakota State in a sec-
ond-round game. Wichita
State and Kansas State could
meet in the third round, as
could Nebraska and Creigh-
ton, a tantalizing matchup
that just might generate as
much interest in the state as
Cornhusker football does on
an autumn Saturday.
“If we’re going to go
and play and Nebraska is
going to the NCAA tourna-
ment, why not go to the same
place,” asked the Bluejays’
Doug McDermott. “I think
it’s going to be a great deal
of fun.”
Speaking of Mr. McBuck-
ets, those teams from the
heartland? They’re not short
on talent, even if they often
have to get creative — and
go to great lengths — to land
some of it.
McDermott is the odds-on
favorite for national player
of the year. Kansas star An-
drew Wiggins is a freshman
of the year candidate and po-
tential No. 1 draft pick. So is
the Jayhawks’ Joel Embiid,
who will miss the frst part of
the tournament with a back
injury.
Oklahoma State features
a dynamic guard in Marcus
Smart. Iowa State has Cana-
dian forward Melvin Ejim,
the Big 12 player of the year.
Iowa’s Roy Devyn Marble
and Oklahoma’s Cameron
Clark are game-changers.
Kansas State has a talented
freshman in its own right,
Marcus Foster.
It’s enough to make more
traditional basketball states
such as Indiana and Illinois
— both of which were shut
out of the NCAA tournament
— feel just a wee bit jeal-
ous.
“There’s great basketball
in this area,” Oklahoma State
coach Travis Ford said. “You
look at the Big 12 and what
we’ve done this year being
the No. 1 basketball confer-
ence in America, by far, I
think it says a lot about the
basketball in the Midwest
right now.”
Iowa State coach Fred
Hoiberg, who grew up in
Iowa and starred for the
Cyclones, couldn’t help but
gush about the quality of the
teams in the region — even
those that didn’t make the
dance.
“I’ve been very im-
pressed with what Tim Miles
has done at Nebraska, and
the ending they had, going
on the road and winning at
Michigan State, having a big
run. North Dakota State, I’m
a big fan of that team and
that coach, so yeah, Midwest
has got pretty good teams,”
he said.
Oklahoma coach Lon
Kruger grew up in Silver
Lake, Kan., played at Kansas
State and later coached there.
But he’s also coached at Flor-
ida and UNLV, and with the
Knicks and the Hawks in the
NBA. And the college hoops
being played in the Midwest
this season? As good as he’s
ever seen.
“Obviously, you’re select-
ed to play in this tournament,
you’re selecting the best 68
teams in the country,” Kru-
ger said Monday, “and a lot
come from the Midwest and
the heartland, and basketball
here in these leagues is out-
standing.”
Now, it’s up to them to
prove just how good against
the rest of America.
Hotbed of college hoops
rest in heartland
Borger High School soccer Photo by Don Rice
Borger High School Baseball Photo by Don Rice
7
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Pictures
Juaquin Martinez, 5, Jude Martinez, 8, and Caitlin Reagan, 9.
Zachary Wetz, 2
Tom Skaggs and his dog Biskit
Ashton Gage, 15mo
Around Town with Don Rice
Landon Casida
Antelope on Highway 207
BORGER NEWS-HERALDservice directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Kristie or Mikaela at 273-5611
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
h
e
W
a
t
e
r
H
e
a
t
e
r
B
a
r
g
a
i
n
H
o
u
s
e
HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
C
a
r
t
e
r

s
T
r
e
e
S
e
r
v
i
c
e
Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
NOW Taking Credit Cards!
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
K

s
MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
WT Vapors
Great Selection of
eGo-C - Twist
Batteries - Tanks
Atomizers - Vapors
Accessories - Much More!!
722 Weatherly - Borger
www.wtvapors.com
806-274-8874
Like Us On FACEBOOK!!
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
Mon-Fri 9 am to 7 pm
Sat 11 am to 4 pm
806-275-9952
M
u
c
h
M
o
r
e
!
!
A
n
d
M
u
c
h
.
.
.
.
.
APPAREL & TANNING
TATTOOS
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
4106 Georgia St. • Amarillo
David Shannon
806-322-3688 • 806-679-3221
Cars • Harleys • Trucks
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
CAREGIVERS
R
o
o
f
n
g
, C
o
n
c
r
e
t
e
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
o
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k
,
F
lo
o
r
in
g
a
n
d
m
o
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e
..
C
a
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y
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) 2
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7
9
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V
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C
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S
T
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I
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N
JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
CONCRETE CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE
DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
1/2 Off Security
Deposit
For the Month
of March
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
On 2 & 3
Bedrooms
Apartments!
806-273-2766
The Good Book Says...
Ask and you shall receive, and
He has never let me down! I
am asking God to help me find
an honest financial partner to
recondition homes in the Borger
area. Money is secured by local
real estate. If you or someone you
know would be interested, please
contact: Charles Hogan
(806)395-6245
or email
charleshogan1@sbcglobal.net
HELP WANTED
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
Look No Further than here for
all your service needs!
Check Out our website
www.borgernewsherald.com
DISH NETWORK
JUMP INTO
WHOLE-HOME
ENTERTAINMENT
AUTHORIZED RETAILER
$
19
99
PROMOTIONAL
PRICES START AT
mo
FOR 12 MONTHS
WITH 24-MONTH
COMMITMENT
OFFER ENDS 6/12/14 RESTRICTIONS APPLY. CALL FOR DETAILS
DBS Satellite Your local retailer.
Call Ken Watson (806) 865 - 3877
ALL OFFERS REQUIRE CREDIT QUALIFICATION.
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
HOUSE FOR SALE
W/LOTS. 918 Cl ark-Sti n-
nett. Call 359-4244 or 570-
9486
420 OTHER CITIES PROP.
HUGE SHOP For sal e/
Lease! Over 17,000 sqft.
Call (806)886-5947
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
i n thi s newspaper i s sub-
j ect to the federal fai r
housi ng act of 1968
whi ch makes i t i l l egal to
adverti se “any prefer-
ence, l i mi tati on or di s-
cri mi nati on based on
race, col or, rel i gi on,
handi cap, fami l y status,
sex or nati onal ori gi n, or
an i ntenti on to make any
such preference, l i mi ta-
tion or discrimination.”
Thi s newspaper wi l l not
knowingly accept any ad-
verti si ng for real estate
which is in violation of the
l aw. Our readers are
hereby i nformed that al l
dwel l i ngs adverti sed i n
thi s newspaper are avai l -
able on an equal opportu-
nity basis.
3 BEDROOM house
(806)595-0285 FOR
SALE!!
410 CITY PROPERTY
THE BORGER NEWS-
HERALD SUGGESTS
that its readers take cau-
tion when calling an
area code beginning
with 809 or a prefix of
011. These are interna-
tional toll numbers and
you will be charged inter-
national long distance
rates. For more informa-
tion and assistance re-
garding the investigation
of work at home opportu-
nities and job lists contact
the Better Business Bu-
reau of South Texas, 609
S International Blvd., We-
slaco, TX 78596. (210)
968-3678.
340 APART. RENTALS
CONTRACTOR HOUSES-
BORGER. FULLY FUR-
NISHED w/Washer & Dry-
er. (806)275-0425
3BDRM/1BATH.
1,400SQFT. C/H/A. NICE
Yard. Call (806)274-0578
2-BEDROOM/1-BATH
HOUSE FOR RENT.
SOME APPLIANCES IN-
CLUDED. Very Ni ce!
(806)395-9630
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
i ng, anythi ng you want
done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
110 WORK WANTED
SONIC LOOKING for
Day/Ni ght Cook. Appl y i n
Person. 208 Cedar-Borger
NEXGEN-PAVING
NOW-HIRING
Labor &Operator
Must Have Valid DL
Call 806-935-4866
JANITORIAL HELP need-
ed i n Borger. Experi ence
Preferred. Cal l (806)674-
1974/(806)674-4018 for in-
formation.
090 HELP WANTED
BNH SPECIAL
Read breaking news stories,
human interest pieces, sports
updates and view special sec-
tions of the Borger News-Herald.
You can also place a classified
ad, advertise your business, and
submit announcements.
Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main St.
Borger, TX 79007
806-273-5611
WWW.BORGERNEWSHERALD.COM
GO ONLINE TO
Panhandle Gun
& Knife Show
cooïaç /o
9o-çc-
June 7th & 8th
For Booth Information Call 806-273-5611
and ask for Stephanie Hooper!
DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
Brierwood Apts.
For Rent
1, 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Castle Dr. Apts.
For Rent
3 bed / 1 bath
Fenced Yard
Call: 273-3982
LABORERS
& SOLDER
TECHNICIANS
NEEDED.
Must have a
mechanical
background,
pass background
screenings & pass
all drug test types.
Apply in person @
115 W. 1st Street -
Fuzzy’s.
Mechanic
Needed:
CoreTerra
Operating is looking
to fill a mechanic’s
position. Must
have experience
in truck, rig and
heavy equipment
repair. Welding and
electrical experience
is preferred.
Employee medical
paid after 90 days.
Apply in person at
2601 W. Kentucky
Ave, Pampa, TX.
(806) 688-9291
Fritch Child
Development
Center needs a
CAREGIVER
from 10 am - 6
pm Mon-Fri.
Apply at 110
N. Bost or
1106 E. 6th -
Borger.
Borger ISD Transportation
Now accepting applications for
Full and Part-Time
School Bus Drivers
Mechanic/Technicians
Apply www.borgerisd.net
Housekeepers
Wanted!
Apply In Person
at 1415W. Wilson
St. - Borger.
No Phone Calls
Please.
Need a
Part Time
Maintenance
person for a
new 48 unit
apt. complex.
Apply in person
at 400 E. 10th
St., Borger, Tx.
Spearman Cattle
Feeders in
Spearman, TX, is
currently accepting
applications for an
OFFICE
ASSISTANT!
Salary is based upon
experience. Please
submit resume to:
Attn: Brent, PO
Box 339, Spearman,
Texas 79081
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
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United Supermarkets #539, located
at 1414 West Wilson, is
seeking team members to
work varying shifts in various
departments, including Food
Service, Bakery, Produce, Market,
Grocery and Overnight Stockers.
United rewards its team members
with weekly pay, flexible schedules,
a comprehensive benefits plan and
a positive working environment.
If you are interested in these
positions, apply online at
www.unitedtexas.com/careers.
EOE
United, Always Happy To Help
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DEALER’s ELECTRICAL SUPPLY IS
NEEDING A WAREHOUSE/COUNTER
SALES MUST BE 21 OR OLDER, HAVE
VALID DL APPLY IN PERSON
@ 214 N. CEDAR
The City of Sanford, Texas is
seeking a City Secretary.
Please send your resume to: Sanford
City Hall, Box 220, Sanford, Tx
79078. You can call:
806-231-4731 - Mayor or
281-917-9521 for info.
Must be certified and able to be
bonded. We are a type B City.
We will be taking application
for the next 2 weeks.
HELP WANTED - PAMPA, TX
Oil & Gas Supply Store
Oilfield Knowledge Preferred
Must pass drug test & have good
driving record, dependable & able
to lift up to 50 lbs. able to drive fork
lift, mechanically inclined a plus.
Strong customer service skills.
Call 806-665-0947
NOTICE OF VACANCY
A job opening is available in the
Sewer Maintenance
Department for a
Maintenance Worker I. The
starting salary for this position
will be $2,006.30 a month or
$925.98 bi-weekly based on
applicant’s qualifications.
High School Diploma/Ged
and a valid Texas Class C
driver's license required.
Apply at City Hall, Human
Resources office by 5pm,
March 27, 2014.
Conner Industries has an
immediate opening for a full
time Office Administrator.
Duties of this receptionist role
include support of the entire
office and light accounting.
Strong knowledge of Microsoft
Office products is required,
bilingual and prior experience
with Quick Books are a plus.
Please send resumes to
alucero@
connerindustriestx.com.
TUESDAY,
MARCH 18, 2014
Borger News- Herald Community
With a “National An-
them of Rock and Roll”
in their pockets, The Dia-
monds are more than sea-
soned performers. They
are classic rock ’n’ roll.
The original quartet rose
to prominence in the 1950s
and early 1960s with 16
Billboard hits including
“The Stroll” and the in-
stant, million-selling hit
“Little Darlin’”which has
sold approximately 20 mil-
lion copies to date. The Di-
amonds have learned that
the durability of classic
rock and roll music is as
much about the future as it
is about the past. The new-
est quartet members, play-
ing saxophone and trom-
bone joined with piano and
drums, continue to expand
their audience by perform-
ing in a variety of venues
and touring Europe, South
America, and Asia. Three
gold records…thirty-three
appearances on American
Bandst and…i nduct i ons
into the Doo-Wop Hall of
Fame and Vocal Group Hall
of Fame … If you miss a
show – you’ll be missing
rock ’n’ roll history!
The Diamonds to perform
in Borger on March 22nd
Stay
Informed
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
CRUTCHES
4
AFRICA
.... are collecting mobility devices.
Drop Off Places Are:
Borger News Herald - 207 N. Main St, Borger
Ameriprise - 1200 S. Cedar St, Borger
H&H Printing - 401 N. Cedar St, Borger
Borger High School - 600 W. 1st St, Borger
www.crutches4africa.org
BULLDOG STORAGE
SALE
Content of spaces of following tenants:
Holly Salinas
#
27, 218 Garrett, Borger Tx 79007
Auburn Langen/Nathan Rodriguez
#
114, P.O. BOX 424, Stinnett Tx
79083 Rhonda Dickens
#
85, 138 Wilshire, Borger Tx 79007
Manny Monarez
#
105, 424 N. Harvey, Borger Tx 79007
Bernice Jimenez
#
6, 513 W. Wilson, Borger Tx 79007
When: Saturday, March 22
nd
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Where: 321 W. 5th (Behind Borger Bank)
Dear EarthTalk: If “cap
and trade” has worked so
well in Europe for reduc-
ing greenhouse gas emis-
sions there, why haven’t
we tried something simi-
lar here in the U.S.? --
Sandra M., Bern, NC
“ Ca p - a n d - t r a d e , ”
whereby big polluters must
pay to emit greenhouse
gases against a capped to-
tal amount that is reduced
over time—has been in ef-
fect across the European
Union (EU) since 2005.
This so-called Emissions
Trading System (ETS) re-
quires 11,000 of the larg-
est electric and industrial
facilities in 28 European
countries to participate.
Some 45 percent of Eu-
rope’s total greenhouse
gas emissions are regu-
lated under the system.
Proponents say the ETS
has succeeded in keeping
greenhouse gas emissions
in check and making Eu-
rope a global leader on
climate. The EU reports
that, by 2020, emissions
from sectors covered by
ETS will be 21 percent
lower than they were in
2005 and 43 percent lower
by 2030.
But critics argue that
Europe’s reduced emis-
sions may be more due
to the global recession
than the ETS, and that
the cheap availability of
allowances has made it
easier for companies to
pay to burn coal than to
switch to cleaner natural
gas or invest more in car-
bon mitigation technolo-
gies. Early in 2014 the EU
tightened up its system by
cutting the number of new
allowances it plans to is-
sue over the next three
years by a third while si-
multaneously creating a
“market reserve” to ab-
sorb extra allowances as
needed.
Meanwhile, Switzer-
land, New Zealand, Aus-
tralia, Kazakhstan and
South Korea have each
set up their own national
cap-and-trade programs
to varying degrees of
success, while regional
versions have popped up
within Japan, Canada and
the U.S.
As to the U.S., whether
or not to establish a na-
tionwide cap-and-trade
system here has been a
hot topic of discussion
in Congress. It last came
up for a vote in 2010,
but never found enough
bi-partisan support to be-
come the law of the land.
But in lieu of any federal
system, two U.S. regions
have undertaken their
own attempts at ratchet-
ing down greenhouse gas
emissions through market
mechanisms:
In 2009, 10 Northeast-
ern states came together
to create the Regional
Greenhouse Gas Initiative
(RGGI), a cap-and-trade
system with the goal of
reducing regional car-
bon emissions from the
power sector 10 percent
from 2009 levels by 2018.
Lower emissions than ex-
pected over the first five
years of the program—
thanks to many utilities
switching over to cleaner
burning and increasingly
cheaper natural gas as
well as less overall eco-
nomic output due to the
recession—led RGGI to
lower its overall annual
cap from 165 million to
91 million tons in 2014,
with a 2.5 percent reduc-
tion every year thereafter
until 2020. Analysts ex-
pect this rejiggering will
drive the price of pollut-
ing five times higher than
it has been and thus force
utilities across the region
to seek cleaner, greener
alternatives to coal as an
electricity feedstock.
The other major U.S.
cap-and-trade player is
California, which launched
its own ETS in 2013 with
a cap set initially at two
percent below 2012 emis-
sion levels. The cap will
then be reduced three
percent a year from 2015-
2020. Some 600 facilities
are big enough polluters
to qualify for participation
in the system, which will
cover around 85 percent
of the state’s total green-
house gas emissions. Giv-
en that California in and
of itself is the 12th larg-
est economy in the world,
its forward-thinking com-
mitment to cap-and-trade
gives hope everywhere to
fans of marshalling mar-
ket forces to bring about
environmental change.
EarthTalk® is writ-
ten and edited by Roddy
Scheer and Doug Moss
and is a registered trade-
mark of E - The Environ-
mental Magazine (www.
emagazine.com). Send
questions to: earthtalk@
emagazine.com.
EarthTalk: “Cap and Trade”
strategies to reduce carbon emissions
10
“Beautifully Disturbed”, by Jenna Hatfeld
More work from Jenna Hatfeld
“A Midsummer Night’s Garden”, by Jenna Hatfeld
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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