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Tuesday February 25, 2014

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February 25, 2014

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Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
Your Local Weather
Tue
2/25
41/19
Considerable
clouds early.
Some de-
crease in
clouds later
in the day.
Wed
2/26
50/30
Plenty of sun.
Highs in the
low 50s and
lows in the
low 30s.
Thu
2/27
68/38
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
upper 60s
and lows in
the upper
30s.
Fri
2/28
60/28
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
upper 20s.
Sat
3/1
52/32
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
low 50s and
lows in the
low 30s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
“War and drink are
the two things man is never
too poor to buy.”
-William Faulkner
Stay
informed
of local news, weather,
sports, and other fun
and interesting events
around
Hutchinson County at
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Sports
Community
Service Directory
Classifeds
Pictures
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DPS: Alcohol believed to be
factor in fatal bridge crash
Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Braden
Sims
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
Like us on Facebook for breaking
news and the latest sports scores!
Don’t
Miss
Around Town
with Don Rice
&
the Recipe of the Day!
Submitted
Recently, members of
the Varsity Choirs traveled
to Canyon High School to
compete in the annual UIL
Solo and Ensemble Contest.
Students have been prepar-
ing for this day since January
and performed their solo (in-
dividual song) or ensemble
(group song) for judges who
would then give them a writ-
ten critique to enable them to
improve and also to award
the best of those receiving
superior ratings, the distin-
guished frst place medal.
For those students compet-
ing in a Class 1 solo or en-
semble, a superior rating
also means a trip to Austin
to compete again at the State
Solo and Ensemble Contest
to be held at the end of May.
Out of 19 Borger entries, 17
entries received superior rat-
ings; Borger Choral Depart-
ment placed 6 out of 6 entries
bound for Texas State Solo
and Ensemble Contest. Stu-
dents involved in the day’s
events were as follows:
Class Three Solos: Su-
perior Ratings were awarded
to: Kaylea Burris, Macken-
zie Garton, Lauren Gillespie,
Bethany Mikles, Laura Putts,
Isabella Stalcup and Paige
Young.
Excellent Ratings were
awarded to: Rose Bennett
and Alexis Love.
Class Two Solos: Superi-
or Ratings - Maegan Cooper,
Haley Vinyard, Cristian Crit-
tenden and Michael Laswell
Class One Solos: Supe-
rior Ratings and State Bound
Seniors - Kelci Courtney,
Sam Crittenden and Sam
Ingram. Juniors - Chyenne
Putts, Austin Richardson and
Kayla DeLeon.
Congratulations to these
students for their Continued,
Superior efforts and repre-
sentation of the Department
of Choral Arts for BISD
Borger Choir members headed for State
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 48, 10 Pages
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
Authorities have re-
leased information about
an accident last Sunday,
February 16, that claimed
the life of a Stinnett man.
Ezequiel Perez, 22, was
on Highway 136/207 be-
tween Stinnett and Borger
in a 1999 Honda car when
he drifted onto the guard
rail at the Canadian River
bridge 3.4mi north of town,
according to a report by
Senior Trooper Chris Ray
of the DPS.
The guard rail impact
caused the car “to vault into
the river bottom,” coming
to rest between the south-
bound and northbound sec-
tions of the bridge, said the
report, where it laid until
its discovery the next day.
When Perez’s car hit the
ground below, said Ray, it
bounced and ejected Per-
ez, who was not wearing
a safety belt. Ray told the
News-Herald that alcohol
is believed to be a possible
factor in the accident but
the DPS had not yet re-
ceived Perez’s toxicology
results.
It is unclear how long
Perez’s vehicle remained
undiscovered by authori-
ties. Before his vehicle
was discovered Sunday
evening, he was reportedly
last seen Sunday morning
around 1:15 a.m. and a
missing persons report had
been fled with the Stinnett
and Borger Police Depart-
ments, said Ray.
Despite all law enforce-
ment agencies in Hutchin-
son county searching for
Perez on Sunday, he was
not found until around 9:30
p.m. that evening when
friends who were checking
the river bottom for him lo-
cated his vehicle.
Perez had been ex-
pected to be travelling
north, toward his home
in Stinnett, but surprising
evidence points to Perez
travelling south, toward
Borger - in the northbound
lanes - when he hit the
guard rail and fipped into
the river bed.
The accident caused
visible damage to the
guard rail, but it wasn’t
examined by law enforce-
ment because, explained
Ray, “Again, the vehicle
was believed to be travel-
ling north bound on TX
136. If it [the damage] had
been noticed, there was no
evidence that the damage
was caused by Mr. Perez
... especially since it was
on the far north end of the
bridge in the northbound
lanes.”
Ray also told reporters
that “there were no tracks
or other evidence to make
anyone who had seen the
damage believe it was re-
lated to a crash, or a vehicle
going off of the bridge.”
When asked if Perez
might have survived the
accident if he had been dis-
covered within a reason-
able time, Ray responded,
“Due to the severity of his
injuries, it is believed that
he was killed on impact.”
1999 Honda driven by Ezequiel Perez after falling from the Canadian River bridge north of Borger - Photo by Don Rice
JC Cortez
Editor
editor@borgernewsherald.com
Ezequiel Perez - courtesy photo
Courtesy Photo
Courtesy photo
MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2
Obituaries
Local Weather
I hope you enjoyed the warmth yesterday because it’s long gone today!
We’ll have a cloudy sky today with areas of fog and freezing drizzle possible
this morning. Highs will only be in the upper 30s this afternoon. The wind will
blow from the northeast to east at 10 to 20 mph, making it feel just that much
colder.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Brian James
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
MIDLOTHIAN, Texas,
February 24, 2014 – Ken
Cope, candidate for U.S.
Senate, today called on the
Senate and the House to take
the lead on moving forward
with the Keystone Pipeline,
saying without that leader-
ship, the Obama Adminis-
tration will continue to delay
the important project.
Cope, a retired Army
Lieutenant Colonel and suc-
cessful business executive,
is challenging incumbent
Sen. Cornyn in the March
4 Republican primary. He
said Cornyn should do more
than just express support for
the project, and challenged
Cornyn and other represen-
tatives to take the lead in
forcing President Obama
through public pressure to
approve the pipeline imme-
diately.
“It has taken longer to
study the Keystone Pipeline
project than it did for the
U.S. to mobilize and win
World War II,” Cope said.
“Even when it looked at last
like the way was clear for
approval, the administration
found yet another way to
delay it. This is ridiculous.
Obviously, the President is
more concerned about the
support of environmental-
ists and their billionaire sup-
porters than he is about the
jobs and national security
that the Keystone Pipeline
would bring and its long-
term value to this country.”
Cope emphasized that
Canada will send the oil to
China if the U.S. doesn’t
approve the pipeline soon,
adding, “The Chinese are
more than anxious for the
U.S. to fumble the ball once
again.”
Cope said the pipeline
is part of his energy plat-
form, which includes an
increase in drilling permits
on publicly owned lands
and getting government out
of the way of the energy in-
dustry so it can lead us to
energy independence. “We
are blessed in this country
with an amazing abundance
of oil and natural gas that
energy companies and their
leading-edge technologies
are now able to obtain,”
Cope said. “We need to be
encouraging, not discourag-
ing, exploration and drilling
and focus on making the
U.S. the world’s leading en-
ergy supplier.”
Expanding the energy
sector, including completion
of the Keystone Pipeline,
means good-paying jobs,
Cope noted. “You only need
to look to North Dakota’s
economic boom to see how
our national economy could
beneft,” he said. “Becoming
truly energy independent –
and this includes aggres-
sively encouraging alterna-
tive energy sources beyond
oil and gas and coal – is the
best thing that could happen
to our economy and our na-
tional security.”
Cope said because there
is bipartisan support for ap-
proving the Keystone Pipe-
line, “we need leadership
in prodding the President to
approve the project. Leader-
ship is why I am in this race,
particularly because of the
lack of Sen. Cornyn’s lead-
ership I see when it comes
to important issues such as
this.”
Information about the
campaign and about Cope’s
positions on the issues con-
fronting Texans and all of
America can be found at the
campaign website, www.Co-
peTexas.com, and the Face-
book page, www.facebook.
com/copetexas. Cope is also
on Twitter at @CopeTexas.
Senate candidate Ken Cope calls on
Congress to drive Keystone Pipeline
SHERIFF OFFICE REPORT
2-19-14 Deputies were dispatched to Sage Mesa in Fritch reference a distur-
bance involving a repossession of a vehicle.
2-21-14 Evelyn Stokes was arrested for possession of controlled substance
and tamper/fabricate physical evidence with intent to impair at a traffc stop in
Stinnett.
2-22-14 Deputies received an animal complaint call and advised the caller of
the actions they could take.
2-22-14 Gary Heard was arrested for DWI on Hwy 136 between Fritch and
Borger.
2-23-14 Tony Vaught was arrested for parole violation at a traffc stop in
Borger.
2-23-14 Deputies were dispatched to Sanford reference four wheelers driving
up and down the streets.
2-23-14 Deputies responded to a 911 hang up call in Sanford and found that a
child had accidentally dialed the number.
2-23-14 The Herring Ranch called and advised of a subject dropping off a dog
on their property and driving away.
FORT WORTH, TX
– Senator Wendy Davis
reported raising $2.85
million dollars between
January 24, 2014 and
February 22, 2014 in
her bid for Governor of
Texas. The total includes
contributions made to
Wendy R. Davis for
Governor, Inc., Wendy
R. Davis Candidate/Of-
fceholder, and the Texas
Victory Committee, Inc.
The total amount
raised by the campaign
since July 1, 2013 is
more than $15.98 mil-
lion received from more
than 91,000 individual
contributors, including
14,349 new individual
contributors in this re-
porting period. The cam-
paign reported over $11.3
million cash on hand.
“We are surpassing
expectations,” said Kar-
in Johanson, campaign
manager of the Wendy
R. Davis for Governor
Campaign. “The level of
support we are receiving
across the state demon-
strates the issues we are
emphasizing - education,
the economy and caring
for our veterans – are
Texas values.”
Since July 1, 2013,
118,073 contributions of
$50 or less accounted for
85% of all contributions
supporting Davis’ candi-
dacy for Governor.
“Grassroots enthusi-
asm for the Wendy Da-
vis campaign continues
to grow as demonstrated
by our more than 90,000
contributors” Johanson
added.
Total Raised:
Wendy R. Davis
for Governor, Inc.:
$1,621,836
Wendy R. Davis Can-
di dat e/ Of f i cehol der :
$2,035
Texas Victory Com-
mittee, Inc.: $1,221,239
The Texas Victory
Committee is a joint ef-
fort between the Wendy
R. Davis for Governor
campaign and Battle-
ground Texas. It was cre-
ated to support electing
the Davis campaign as
well as support Senator
Davis’ specifc commit-
ment to running a grass-
roots campaign across
Texas in 2014 and be-
yond.
Wendy Davis raises $2.8m
in latest reporting period
Democratic hopeful raises more money than likely opponent, Greg Abbot
Alta Mae Novotny, 100, died February 23, 2014
in Borger.
Services will be at 10:00 AM Wednesday, February 26,
2014 at Carmichael-Whatley Colonial Chapel, with Rev. C.
W. Parker, Odyssey Hospice chaplain, offciating. Burial will
follow in Memory Gardens Cemetery under the direction of
Carmichael-Whatley Funeral Directors.
Mrs. Novotny was born April 2, 1913 in Freemount, Mis-
souri to John and Mary Smith. She met and married the love
of her life, Adolph Novotny, in 1947. He preceded her in
death in 2003. She worked at several jobs over the years, including working as a nurse’s as-
sistant at St. Anthony’s Hospital in Great Bend, Kansas for over seven years. She was also
preceded in death by three brothers and fve sisters.
Survivors included numerous nieces and nephews.
The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 6:00 – 7:30 PM on Tuesday, Febru-
ary 25, 2014.
Memorials may be made to First Baptist Church, P.O. Box 176, Skellytown, Texas 79080.
Sign the on-line guest register at www.carmichael-whatley.com
Save the date on your
calendar for Friday, April
11, for the annual Coun-
ty-wide Health Fair. The
Health Fair will be held
on the Frank Phillips
College Campus in the
Borger Community Ac-
tivity Center. A move is
being made in the loca-
tion to allow more space
for increased informa-
tion and screenings to be
presented. The hours for
this year’s Health Fair
will start at 8:30 a.m.
with fasting blood draws
and the remainder of the
exhibits open from 9:00
a.m. until 2:30 p.m. The
Health Fair provides an
opportunity to gain, not
only free health and well-
ness information, but to
participate in free health
screenings. An added
feature to the Health Fair
this year will be a num-
ber of outside exhibits in-
cluding Electrical Safety,
Teens in the Driver Seat,
Drunk Driving Simula-
tion, and Child Car Seat
Restraint Safety Checks.
The committee in-
cluding Golden Plains
Community Hospital,
Frank Phillips College,
Borger Police Depart-
ment, Borger Chamber
of Commerce and Texas
Agri Life Extension Ser-
vice – Hutchinson Coun-
ty, has worked to bring
information to reach all
age groups with exhibits
and demonstrations and
information.
Of special interest for
families with infants or
young children will be
the Car Seat Restraint
Safety Checks. Appoint-
ments must be made in
advance for this service at
the Health Fair. Call the
County Extension Offce
at 878-4026 to book your
time for this service.
Watch for more infor-
mation over the coming
weeks with specifcs on
others who will be fea-
turing information and
screening s to help insure
a healthier Hutchinson
County.
Save the date for Hutchinson
County Health Fair
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
February 28
Laurie McAfee from the
Area Agency on Aging in
Amarillo will be presenting
an educational seminar on
Medicare Fraud and Abuse.
10 a.m., GPCH Board Room
March 1-2
Altrusa Club will hold its
Craft Show at the Aluminum
Dome Saturday and Sunday.
The show will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. on
Saturday and from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday.
Admission is free. Vendors
from over the area will fll
the Dome. The concession
stand will be open the entire
time with delicious snacks
available. Proceeds go to
support charitable causes in
the Hutchinson County.
March 6
Hutchinson County
Republican Women’s meet-
ing. Frank Phillips College
Gallery Room, 12 noon.
Speaker: Borger City Coun-
cilwoman Brandy Callahan
will speak on the Borger
Youth Advisory Council and
more. Call 273-8363 or
274-6903 for more informa-
tion
March 10-12
Texas Agrilife Extension
presents Ooh La La Days!
10 am-2 pm in the Club
Room of the Hutchinson
County Library in Borger.
$15 for 4-H members, $25
for non-members (ages 3rd-
12th grade). RSVP to the
Extension Offce by March
5th, 2014 878-4026 (there
are 25 spots, so RSVP soon!
Monday: Crafty Sewing -
Bring a t-shirt
Tuesday: Arts & Crafts
Wednesday: Fun Day!
Snacks provided each day,
bring your own lunch &
drink
March 14
The Red Hat Mamas will
meet at 11:30 a.m. at
Lorene’s Mexican Kitchen
Door prizes will be awarded.
Ladies, wear green for St.
Patrick’s Day!
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100
S. Hedgecoke, Borger. Call
273-5621 or 857-3947 for
more information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian
Church, 200 S. Bryan, 6 p.m.
Call 806-382-2449 or 806-
273-6017 for more informa-
tion.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist Church
Borger Fellowship Hall 9:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. child care
is provided. Call FBC 263-
5621 for information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medical
Field Employees in Hutchin-
son County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College Cafe-
teria in the Gallery Room For
more information call Aileen
Jackson at 274-9890or Betty
Jordon at 857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyteri-
an Church, 418 W. Coolidge,
8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more
information.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, second
foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6
p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you
write poetry and want to con-
nect with other poets to con-
nect with other poets, read
and get positive feedback we
would like to form a lunch
group and/or an evening
group. If interested please
call Mary Zan at 857-3670
for more information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for life
challenges, 6:30 p.m., That
One Place Community Cen-
ter, 212 E. Broadway, Fritch.
Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria Call
274-3321 for more informa-
tion.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9 a.m.
Call 886-0299 for more
information.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stinnett
Senior Citizen Building, 6:30
p.m. Call 878-2960 or 878-
3272 for more information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Ministry,
7 p.m. Call 857-3975 for
location.
Alibates Creek Indian Danc-
ers, 7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran
Church, 212 W. Jefferson.
Call 274-3239 for more
information.
VFW Post #1789 meets at
the VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room, 1 p.m. Call 467-5732
for more information.
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings, Op-
portunities Center, 11 a.m. to
noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce, 6:30
p.m. Call 806-878-4026.
Vietnam Veterans of America
Chapter 404, 403 S Cornell
in Fritch, 5:30 p.m. dinner
and 6:00 meetings. Call 857-
3950 for more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure screen-
ings, MAL’S Café, Stinnett,
8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Phillips Alumni Association,
Frank Phillips College Gal-
lery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post 0671
meets at 7:30 pm at the
American Legion post next
to the Aluminum Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art 10:30-
12 St. Andrews United Meth-
odist Church ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s welcome,
Doors open 5 pm, Cards sold
starting at 6 p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm, $14
each packet of 13 games or 6
papers for each of 13 games,
Additional papers half pack-
ets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more
information.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge, 7:30
p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost Chil-
dren Grief Support Group,
New U on Main Street, 7
p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more
information.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Second Thursdays
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen
Sunshine Club, 12 noon for
lunch followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7 p.m.,
305 N. Deahl. Call 273-7127
or see fellowshipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
Fritch Sunshine Club, 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Mennonite
Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
United Supermarket, 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class, 10
a.m., Golden Plains Commu-
nity Hospital Board Room.
Call 467-5718 or 467-5857
for more information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Call 878-2597 for
more information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor Home
Owners Assoc., 10 a.m.,
Club House.
Marine Corps League Haw-
thorne Det. #1349, 9 a.m.,
421 E. Broadway, Stinnett.
Young adults Christian
marriage class, Word of Life
Church, 9:45 a.m.Sundays,
Wednesdays, Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcotics
Anonymous, Valley Drive
west entrance, Cedar Street,
7:30 p.m. Call 806-570-
2028 or 857-4038 for more
information
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2014 Borger News- Herald
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
Age Defying
Serum
LUXIVA
®
Potent vitamin -
enriched serum
helps boost skin’s
natural defenses
Recipe of the Day
Looking for a hearty dish to warm up
your table this season? Look no further than
Tuscan Lasagna al Forno.
Tuscan Lasagna al Forno
For the Sugo:
Ingredients:
3/4 - 1 lb ground beef or ground Italian
sausage
1 red onion, diced
1 carrot, small diced
1 rib of celery, small diced
1-2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup DaVinci Chianti
2-3 cups tomato sauce
Pinch dried oregano
Pinch of allspice or pumpkin pie spice
Salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
In a heavy bottom skillet, heat a table-
spoon or two of olive oil over medium high
heat and saute the onion, carrot and celery
until nicely golden brown, almost caramel-
ized. Add the ground meat and garlic to the
soffrito (diced veggies) and cook until done,
breaking up any big pieces. The meat should
be small and somewhat minced.
Take the skillet off the heat and stir in the
wine, scraping up the bits of good stuff (fond)
on the bottom of the pan.
Stir in the tomato sauce, oregano and all-
spice or pumpkin pie spice and a pinch or two
of salt and pepper. Put the skillet back on the
heat and bring to a low simmer. Let the sauce
simmer while you prepare the bechamel.
Bechamel or White Ragu:
Ingredients:
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
6 tablespoons four
3 cups warm whole milk
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
In a large sauce pan melt the butter over
medium heat. When the butter is melted,
whisk in the four. Then slowly whisk in the
warm milk.
Continue whisking until your milk comes
to a simmer and begins to thicken. Turn the
heat down to prevent burning the sauce and
continue whisking until the sauce thickens.
Stir in the pinch of fresh grated nutmeg
and season to taste with salt and pepper.
You will want this bechamel (white ragu)
thicker than a bechamel that you might toss
with pasta. So if it feels heavy or thick that’s
OK. It’s perfect for the lasagna.
For the Lasagna:
Ingredients:
Fresh lasagna sheets, cooked - (enough to
fll a 9x13 baking dish)
3-4 cups sugo
3-4 cups bechamel
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
1/2 cup shaved pecorino Toscano
Chopped fresh Italian parsley for garnish
Directions:
Pre-heat the oven to 350 F.
Ladle a little sugo in the bottom of the
baking dish and line with pasta sheets. Ladle
the pasta sheets with bechamel, sprinkle of
parmesan and pecorino. Continue alternating
the bechamel and sugo until you’ve created
5-6 layers or used all your pasta sheets. Be
sure to save a cup of sugo for the top of the
lasagna.
Sprinkle the lasagna with the remaining
cheese, cover with foil and bake for about 15-
20 minutes or until the sides are bubbly.
Raise the heat to 400 F. Remove the foil
and cook the lasagna until the top is toasty
and cheese is golden brown, another 10 min-
utes or so. You may wish to put it under the
broiler for extra color.
Let the lasagna rest for about 10 minutes
before slicing. This will allow the bechamel
and cheese to frm for slicing.
Serve with a side of extra sugo and grated
Parmesan if desired.
The recipe for indulging in
Italian comfort cuisine at home
3
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FEBRUARY 25, 2014 Borger News- Herald
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4
TODAY IN HISTORY
1570 – Pope Pius V ex-
communicates Queen Eliza-
beth I of England.
1631 – François de Bas-
sompierre, a French courtier,
arrested by Richelieu’s orders.
1797 – Colonel William
Tate and his force of 1000-
1500 soldiers surrender after
the Last Invasion of Britain.
1821 – Greek War of In-
dependence: Alexander Ypsi-
lantis issues a proclamation at
Iași, announcing that he had
“the support of a great power”
(i.e. Russia).
1831 – Battle of Olszynka
Grochowska, part of Polish
November Uprising against
Russian Empire.
1836 – Samuel Colt is
granted a United States patent
for the Colt revolver.
1843 – Provisional Ces-
sion of the Hawaiian or Sand-
wich Islands established by
Lord George Paulet.
1848 – Provisional govern-
ment in revolutionary France,
by Louis Blanc’s motion,
guarantees workers’ right.
1856 – A Peace conference
opened in Paris after Crimean
War.
1866 – Miners in Cala-
veras County, California,
discover what is now called
the Calaveras Skull, human
remains that supposedly in-
dicated that man, mastodons,
and elephants had co-existed.
1870 – Hiram Rhodes Rev-
els, a Republican from Missis-
sippi, is sworn into the United
States Senate, becoming the
frst African American ever to
sit in the U.S. Congress.
1875 – Guangxu Emperor
of China began his reign, un-
der Empress Dowager Cixi’s
regency.
1901 – J. P. Morgan incor-
porates the United States Steel
Corporation.
1912 – Marie-Adélaïde,
the eldest of six daughters of
Guillaume IV, becomes the
frst reigning Grand Duchess
of Luxembourg.
1916 – World War I: the
Germans capture Fort Douau-
mont during the Battle of Ver-
dun.
1919 – Oregon places a
1 cent per U.S. gallon tax on
gasoline, becoming the frst
U.S. state to levy a gasoline
tax.
1921 – Tbilisi, capital of
the Democratic Republic of
Georgia, is occupied by Bol-
shevist Russia.
1928 – Charles Jenkins
Laboratories of Washington,
D.C. becomes the frst holder
of a television license from the
Federal Radio Commission.
1932 – Adolf Hitler ob-
tains German citizenship by
naturalization, which allows
him to run in the 1932 election
for Reichspräsident.
1933 – The USS Ranger
is launched. It is the frst US
Navy ship to be built solely as
an aircraft carrier.
1941 – February Strike:
In occupied Amsterdam, a
general strike is declared in
response to increasing anti-
Jewish measures instituted by
the Nazis.
1945 – World War II: Tur-
key declares war on Germany.
1947 – The State of Prus-
sia ceases to exist.
1948 – The Communist
Party takes control of govern-
ment in Czechoslovakia and
the period of the Third Repub-
lic ends.
1951 – The frst Pan Amer-
ican Games are held in Buenos
Aires, Argentina.
1954 – Gamal Abdel Nass-
er is made premier of Egypt.
1956 – In his speech On the
Personality Cult and its Con-
sequences Nikita Khrushchev,
leader of the Soviet Union de-
nounces the cult of personality
of Joseph Stalin.
1964 – North Korean
Prime Minister Kim Il-sung
calls for the removal of feudal-
istic land ownership aimed at
turning all cooperative farms
into state-run ones.
1964 – U.S. Air Force
launches a satellite employing
a US Air Force Atlas/Agena
combination from Point Ar-
guello (LC-2-3) in California
and from Cape Kennedy in
Florida.
1968 – Vietnam War: 135
unarmed citizens of Hà My
village in South Vietnam’s
Quảng Nam Province are
killed and buried en masse by
South Korean troops in what
would come to be known as
the Hà My massacre.
1971 – The frst unit of the
Pickering Nuclear Generating
Station, the frst commercial
nuclear power station in Can-
ada, goes online.
1980 – The government
of Suriname is overthrown by
a military coup which is initi-
ated with the bombing of the
police station from an army
ship off the coast of the na-
tion’s capital, Paramaribo
1986 – People Power
Revolution: President of the
Philippines Ferdinand Marcos
fees the nation after 20 years
of rule; Corazon Aquino be-
comes the Philippines’ frst
woman president.
1987 – Southern Methodist
University’s football program
is the frst college football
program to receive the Death
Penalty by the NCAA’s Com-
mittee on Infractions. It was
revealed that athletic offcials
and school administrators had
knowledge of a “slush fund”
used to make illegal payments
to the school’s football players
as far back as 1981.
1991 – Gulf War: An Iraqi
scud missile hits an American
military barracks in Dhahran,
Saudi Arabia killing 28 U.S.
Army Reservists from Penn-
sylvania.
1991 – The Warsaw Pact is
declared disbanded.
1992 – Khojaly massa-
cre: about 613 civilians are
killed by Armenian armed
forces during the confict in
Nagorno-Karabakh region of
Azerbaijan.
1994 – Mosque of Abra-
ham massacre: In the Cave
of the Patriarchs in the West
Bank city of Hebron, Baruch
Goldstein opens fre with an
automatic rife, killing 29 Pal-
estinian worshippers and in-
juring 125 more before being
subdued and beaten to death
by survivors.
2009 – Members of the
Bangladesh Rifes mutiny at
their headquarters in Pilkhana,
Dhaka, Bangladesh, resulting
in 74 deaths, including more
than 50 army offcials.
Opinion
February is scout month,
and it always reminds me
of the 18 boys that were in
my troop when I was scout-
master. On one particular
evening, we were just start-
ing scouts when a new boy
came in. He looked lost, so
I went over to greet him.
“May I help you?”
He nodded. “I was told
that a scout troop met here
on Tuesday nights, and I
was hoping to join them.”
“That would be us,” I
said, holding out my hand
to shake his. “I’m the
scoutmaster.”
He cautiously took my
hand. “But no one is wear-
ing a uniform.”
Just then, Gordy came
over. “Hey, David, come to
join us?”
David nodded. “This is
scouts, right?”
“Of course,” Gordy
replied. “What did you
think?”
“I wasn’t sure. No one
is wearing a uniform.”
Gordy laughed. “We got
more important things to
do than wear uniforms. We
wear them for each court of
honor, but not for camping,
rock climbing, hiking, or
anything fun.”
I smiled when I heard
Gordy say that. My boys
were farm boys. They
worked hard all week, and
scouting was their break
from work. I knew that
some people would frown
at me for not insisting uni-
forms be worn at every
activity, but I learned long
ago to assess the impor-
tance of my battles. Some
were worth fghting and
some were not, and to me,
there were more important
rules requiring a line to be
drawn.
David joined us for the
evening’s activities, and
seemed to enjoy himself. I
was teaching the boys win-
ter survival skills, and we
were talking about how to
safely build and use a snow
cave.
“Do you guys really go
camping in winter?” David
asked.
“Of course,” Gordy re-
plied. “We have the Klond-
ike Derby coming up the
weekend after this one. A
guy is only half a man if he
can’t survive outside in the
winter.”
David looked doubtful,
so I explained that if a per-
son was prepared, winter
camping was not only safe,
but could be a lot of fun.
We ended the evening
with a rousing game of
basketball, something we
usually did as a reward for
the boys’ diligence while I
taught them. When we fn-
ished, I went with David to
his home to visit with his
mother about getting him
registered.
David’s mom, Leanna,
welcomed me with a big
smile. “I’m so glad that Da-
vid has found a scout troop
to join,” she said. “He was
active in his troop in Cali-
fornia and has seemed lost
without them.”
“We’re glad to have him
with us,” I said, handing her
the registration paperwork
to fll out. “We are a very
active troop, and I think he
will have a lot of fun.”
She started flling out the
paperwork as she continued
to speak. “In California, I
think they went camping
every single month.”
I nodded. “Yes, we do,
too.”
She laughed. “Of course,
not in the winter.”
“But they do,” Da-
vid said. “They are going
camping a week from Fri-
day.”
Suddenly Leanna’s
smile disappeared. She
picked up the paper and
slammed it into my chest.
“That’s stupid. It is below
zero out there! I’m not let-
ting my son go camping in
this cold.”
“But, Mom . . . ,” David
started to complain.
“No!” she answered.
“And that is fnal!” She
then turned to me. “I can’t
believe you could be so ir-
responsible!”
“Scouting is about pre-
paredness and survival,”
I answered. “We train the
boys to survive in cold like
this. They need to learn to
deal with it because this is
where they live. What will
happen if your son is caught
out somewhere without
learning those skills?” She
continued to silently glare
at me, so I continued. “I
will be with them, and I
promise that the boys will
be fne. That’s what we pre-
pare them for.”
Leanna looked at her
son’s pleading face, then
at me, and, reluctantly, she
signed. But as I was leav-
ing, I heard her say to him,
“I think we should be care-
ful. I still think anyone that
would take boys winter
camping might be kind of
crazy.”
A Crazy Scoutmaster
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2012
Daris Howard
Life’s Outtakes
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Sudden and surprising changes
may take place at home or in
your family at this time. For
most, this will be a positive
thing. Stay light on your feet,
and be prepared to go with the
fow.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Unexpected short trips might
fall in your lap at this time.
Prepare for this by keeping bag
packed. This means you’re ready
for action.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Surprise opportunities to boost
your earnings might come your
way at this time. This could
entail a sudden job change or a
chance to make money on the
side. Stay alert.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
All kinds of sudden, fortunate
things can bless you now,
because lucky Jupiter is in your
sign getting a boost from Uranus.
Anything could happen.
LEO(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Hidden events can create
moments of revelation for you.
They might be an epiphany or
a slow dawning of awareness
of what your life is all about.
Sometimes the obvious is hard
to grasp.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
You might make a new friend
who is unusual, bizarre or avant-
garde. Whatever the case, this
person will expand your world
and make you feel younger.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Be prepared for chances to
boost your good name in the
public eye now. Something
unexpected will happen that
helps your reputation to shine!
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Sudden opportunities to
travel or get further education
or training might come to you
now. If so, your window of
opportunity will be brief, so act
fast!
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21)
Gifts, goodies and favors from
others will come your way now.
This might happen swiftly, so do
not dillydally. Just accept what is
yours and say, “Thank you.”
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan.
19)
Partnerships and friendships
might hold some surprises for
you now. Fortunately, they
will be pleasant. Singles could
meet someone older, richer or
worldlier.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18)
Look for ways to suddenly
improve your job. You might
get a better job, better duties or
better working conditions. Yay
me!
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20)
Unexpected vacations might
come your way now or chances
to explore opportunities in the
arts, sports or working with
children. Surprise firtations
could blossom into new
romance.
TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2014
Borger News- Herald Comics
5
Borger News- Herald
Sports
6
TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2014
By: Jessica Umbarger-Cummings
The Sanford-Fritch Varsity Eagles took on the Pampa
Harvesters in a double header on Saturday. The frst match-up
would be a close one for the Eagles but Pampa would prove to
be too much and pull out the win in seven innings, 4-6.
Pampa’s Gaines who pitched all seven innings lead the
game with strikeout’s racking up an impressive 13. Sanford-
Fritch’s Seth Hanifn would have four strike outs. Pampa
would get off to a fast start scoring bringing four runners
home in the 1st inning. The Harvesters would bring in two
more runners in the bottom of the 4th and 5th innings, mak-
ing their score 0-6. Sanford-Fritch would battle back in the
top of the seventh bringing 4 runners home, but Pampa would
prove to be much and take the win, 4-6.
In the second match-up between the teams, Sanford-Fritch
would fall 1-10 in four innings. Sanford-Fritch’s Ryan Blake-
ly and Nathan Zavala would pitch this game for the Eagles.
Eagles fall in Double
Header to Harvesters
Friday Saturday, and
Sunday Frank Phillips Lady
Plainsmen softball team
hosted the weekend tourna-
ment.
On Friday the girls went
up against Lamar Communi-
ty College. This frst game of
the weekend just didn’t start
off well for the Lady Plains-
men. LCC went home with
the win over a fnal score of
5-1.
Unfortunately the second
game on Friday did not end
well. El Paso Community
College headed home after
only 5 innings with the win
of 15-0.
Saturday’s games started
off a bit better for FPC. Dan-
ville Area Community Col-
lege intended to leave with
the win as well. Not the case
this time. FPC won this game
with a fnal score of 6 - 5.
Saturday’s game 4 also
only went 5 innings. Western
Nebraska Community Col-
lege made the long trip back
home celebrating their big
win over FPC with score of
11 - 0.
After an overnight rest,
Sunday’s game did run a
little smoother. The Lady
Plainsmen took on Dodge
City Community College
and got on the board again.
Just not enough to hold the
win. Dodge Cityt girls went
home to share the news of
their win with the fnal score
of 7 - 2.
FPC sofball win 1 out of 5
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Borger Bulldogs Tennis
team fnishes 1st
A tournament of Cham-
pions. The Borger Bulldog
Tennis team traveled to Lev-
elland to compete in this
point system tournament.
Aarron Madden went un-
defeated placing frst place
in both boys singles and dou-
bles. Micah Wilson was his
partner for the doubles.
Austin Ember won frst
place in line 6 for the boys
singles, while Courtney Duff
won frst place in the girls
singles.
The rest of the team all
placed second and third scor-
ing points for the team right
along with Daisy Rodriguez.
On the trip back to Borger
there were all together twen-
ty-four brand new individual
trophies coming home with
the team.
The Borger Bulldog Ten-
nis team placed second for
All Around Boys.
However, they also placed
FIRST in All Around Team
Championships! As I stated
earlier, Daisy Rodriguez and
the rest of the team scored all
the points to make this pos-
sible.
The tennis team will be
going to Amarillo this com-
ing weekend for another tour-
nament. This one may be a
little harder for the Bulldogs
as they will be cpompeting
with all 4A and 5A teams.
Congratulations to each
and every one of you.
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Monday’s Softball contest
between West Texas High
and River Road High that
was played at River Road
was a non-conferance game.
The girls on both teams
must have worked hard. The
score proves that.
West Texas High came
home happy about their win
over River Road with a fnal
score of 32 - 14.
Great job with that win
Comanches!
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
West Texas High
defeats River Road
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
(AP) — There was a moment
late in the Daytona 500 when
Dale Earnhardt Jr. had a mo-
ment to catch his breath. It
was clearly his race to lose
and the tension ran thick
through Junior Nation, all
the way into his car.
Steve Letarte, the crew
chief and cheerleader who
had rebuilt Earnhardt’s
crumpled confdence and
returned him to a champion-
ship contender, used the mo-
ment under caution to settle
his driver.
“Having fun?” Letarte
asked over the radio.
“Yeah, but it’s the big
prize, man. It’s hard to enjoy
it,” Earnhardt said, before he
paused. “I’m enjoying par-
ticular pieces of it, but the
entire experience is driving
me crazy.”
That’s the albatross that
was strapped to the back of
NASCAR’s most popular
driver as closed in on his
second Daytona 500 victory.
It had been 10 years since he
won his frst 500, and after
three runner-up fnishes the
last four seasons in a race
that had caused his family so
much heartache and joy, the
moment was overwhelming.
There’s so much pressure
on Earnhardt, who entered
the season-opening show-
case mired in a 55-race los-
ing streak dating to 2012.
He’d won just two races since
joining mighty Hendrick
Motorsports in 2008, and as
he closes in on his 40th birth-
day, he is still searching for
his frst Cup championship.
It’s been openly stated
by the suits at NASCAR
that when Junior wins, NA-
SCAR’s popularity surges.
So under that theory, if he
could just get it together, the
days of fat television num-
bers and sagging attendance
would certainly spike.
That’s a lot of pressure to
put on one guy, and it hit him
as he readied himself for the
homestretch Sunday night.
“It’s a big race and you
want to win it so badly, and
your team wants to win so
badly,” he said afterward.
“You realize at that moment
that there are countless peo-
ple watching on television
and there are countless peo-
ple sitting in the grandstands
with your shirts and hats on,
and your team is over on the
pit wall and your family back
home — there are so many
people pulling for you and
want to see you win. It’s a
heavy weight.”
This time, he delivered.
He emerged from a rain
delay of more than six hours
with the strongest car in the
feld. As other drivers strug-
gled to keep busy during the
lengthy break, Earnhardt said
his concern was not consum-
ing too much of the junk food
stored in his motorhome.
He knew what he had in
the No. 88 Chevrolet.
“I knew it was something
special,” he said. “I knew we
had enough race car. I was a
little bit nervous because the
pressure was on me because
there was plenty of car to do
it.”
Earnhardt handled every
challenge over the fnal 50
miles. He shook off Greg
Biffe, the peskiest foe, and
then Carl Edwards. Lined up
for a two-lap sprint to the fn-
ish, he found himself next to
one-time protege Brad Kesel-
owski, who had a car almost
as strong as Earnhardt’s.
But Earnhardt had team-
mate Jeff Gordon on his
bumper to help on the fnal
restart, and once he cleared
Keselowski it was essen-
tially over. Moves made by
other drivers in the pack ru-
ined Keselowski’s pursuit
and Denny Hamlin stormed
through the feld but didn’t
have the help he needed or
enough laps to mount a prop-
er charge.
Hamlin, who won two
races earlier in Speedweeks
and was going for the trifec-
ta, was dejected with second
place. But he noted the sig-
nifcance of the victory.
“Any time an Earn-
hardt wins at Daytona,” he
shrugged.
The late Dale Earnhardt
won 34 races at Daytona
International Speedway, but
his only 500 victory came in
1998 in his 20th try. He was
killed in an accident on the
last lap of the 2001 race, trig-
gered while he tried to pro-
tect a 1-2 fnish for Michael
Waltrip and his son, who
both drove for him.
Conspiracy has followed
Earnhardt Jr. since his fa-
ther’s death as fans wondered
if some of his biggest career
moments were freebies from
NASCAR during a time of
mourning. Third-place fn-
isher Keselowski believes
Daytona 500 win No. 2 can-
not be challenged.
“I think this particu-
lar race, there’s no drama.
There’s no feeling I think
anybody could legitimately
have that there’s voodoo
magic that he won,” Kesel-
owski said.
There was only euphoria.
NASCAR’s favorite son
won the biggest race and
earned the frst spot in the
playoffs under a new cham-
pionship format that rewards
winning. Hendrick Motor-
sports got at least one week
of respite from fans won-
dering why Earnhardt never
wins.
And Earnhardt, at least
for this week, got to remove
that albatross. And after f-
nally joining Twitter, he re-
warded his fans — more than
400,000 despite only four
tweets — by posting a Mon-
day morning selfe, standing
in front of the statue of his
father at Daytona:
“Look who I ran into at
the Daytona Experience.
Dad’s Happy!”
Dale Earnhardt’s
Daytona 500 win lifs ‘heavy weight’
LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP)
— Naadir Tharpe had 19
points to lead fve Kansas
players in double fgures, and
the ffth-ranked Jayhawks
held off Oklahoma 83-75 on
Monday night to wrap up a
share of their 10th consecu-
tive Big 12 championship.
Wayne Selden and An-
drew Wiggins added 15
points each, and Joel Em-
biid had 12 points and 13
rebounds for the Jayhawks
(22-6, 13-2), who poured off
the bench at the buzzer to
celebrate the latest addition
to their nation-leading 57
conference titles.
It might be the only one
for Wiggins and Embiid, the
dynamic freshman duo pro-
jected to be lottery picks if
they come out this season.
Wiggins has already stated
his intention to do so.
Cameron Clark had 18
points and Buddy Hield fn-
ished with 16 for the Sooners
(20-8, 9-6), who have lost 12
of their last 13 games against
the Jayhawks, including both
this season.
They had Kansas on the
ropes for most of this one.
After taking the lead mid-
way through the second half,
Kansas started to put the
hammer down, frustrating
Oklahoma into poor outside
shots and slicing through the
lane for easy layups.
Tharpe made it all hap-
pen, either scoring himself
or helping one of his team-
mates. The much-maligned
point guard fnished with
fve assists and only one
turnover.
Only two schools in men’s
Division I basketball have
won more consecutive con-
ference titles than Kansas:
UCLA captured 13 straight
from 1967-79 in the Pac-10,
and Gonzaga won 11 straight
in the West Coast Conference
from 2001-11.
The frst half Monday
night boiled down to an old-
fashioned Big Eight tussle.
The Jayhawks threw the
frst body punch, picking up
right where they left off in a
rout of Texas by taking a 15-4
lead. Oklahoma answered
with a few haymakers of its
own, going on a 13-2 charge
and eventually pulling ahead
27-25 with 5:26 left in the
half.
Selden took over down
the stretch, though, scoring
seven straight points to give
Kansas the lead back. Frank
Mason’s 3-pointer capped a
10-0 surge and made it 42-33
at halftime.
The Jayhawks, arguably
the deepest team in the Big
12, forged their lead despite
playing without a handful of
players due to foul trouble.
Wiggins, Tharpe, Perry El-
lis and Jamari Traylor all
had two fouls, and Connor
Frankamp was on the bench
with three.
Wiggins picked up his
third on the frst play of the
second half, when Ryan
Spangler drove to the bas-
ket for an and one. It was the
start of a 10-2 run that got the
Sooners back in the game.
Clark’s hot shooting and
a couple of timely 3-point-
ers by Hield gave Oklahoma
the lead, only for Kansas to
come back once more. Wig-
gins scored on a putback of
his own miss with 8:01 left
to give the Jayhawks a 60-
59 lead, and their advantage
grew to 69-63 a few minutes
later.
The Sooners kept fnding
answers. When Wiggins hit
a 3-pointer to make it 74-
66, Isaiah Cousins promptly
scored in the paint. When
Tharpe got a home-rim
bounce on a pull-up jumper,
Hield was there to hit a fall-
away 3-pointer to close with-
in 76-71 with 1:30 left.
Oklahoma simply ran
out of time, and as the fnal
seconds ticked off the clock,
another sellout crowd at the
Phog began to chant, “Ten
straight! Ten straight!”
No. 5 Kansas beats Oklahoma
83-75 for Big 12 title
TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2014
Borger News- Herald 7
Community
Stay
Informed
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
EarthTalk: Dirty Fuels
The Amarillo Little
Theatre is pleased to
present the very funny
play The Miss Firecrack-
er Contest as the fourth
production of the 2013-
14 Mainstage season!
Written by Pulitzer Prize
winning playwright,
Beth Henley, this show
is sure to be a hit with
ALT audiences.
The place is the small
Mississippi town of
Brookhaven, the time
a few days before the
Fourth of July. Carnelle
Scott (known locally
as “Miss Hot Tamale”)
is rehearsing furiously
for the Miss Firecracker
Contest—hoping that a
victory will salvage her
tarnished reputation and
allow her to leave town
in a blaze of glory. The
unexpected arrival of her
cousin Elain, a former
Miss Firecracker winner,
(who has walked out on
her rich but boring hus-
band and her two small
children) complicates
matters a bit, as does the
repeated threat of Elain’s
eccentric brother, Del-
mount, (recently released
from a mental institu-
tion) to sell the family
homestead and decamp
for New Orleans. But,
aided by a touchingly
awkward seamstress
named Popeye and sev-
eral other cheerfully nut-
ty characters, Carnelle
perseveres—leading to
a climax of unparalleled
hilarity, compassion and
radiant fireworks!
ALT has cast a phe-
nomenal cast of new-
comers and veteran ac-
tors for this production.
They include Stephanie
Adams, Amber Bur-
ton, Justin Loe, Deanna
Smiddy, Ryan Sustaita
and Jorden Whetstone.
Bobby Schaffer is Ar-
tistic Director with Kim
Shreffler as Assistant to
the Director.
This show is rated
PG.
Show dates are Febru-
ary 27, 28, March 1, 6, 7,
8 at 8:00 pm and March
9 at 2:30 pm.
Don’t miss this fun
show. Make your reser-
vations today!!
Tickets are available
at the Amarillo Little
Theatre Box Office at
2019 Civic Circle or by
calling (806) 355-9991.
Tickets may also be re-
served by e-mailing jo@
amarillolittletheatre.org
ALT is the place to
BE!
Amarillo Little Theatre presents:
The Miss Firecracker Contest
Dear EarthTalk:
What are “dirty fuels”
and why are they so
called? -- Bill Green, Se-
attle, WA
The term “dirty fuels”
refers to fuels derived
from tar sands, oil shale
or liquid coal. Just like
their more conventional
fossil fuel counterparts
such as petroleum and
coal, they can be turned
into gasoline, diesel and
other energy sources that
can generate extreme
amounts of particulate
pollution, carbon emis-
sions and ecosystem
destruction during their
lifecycles from produc-
tion to consumption.
“Because tar sands
[have] more sulfur, ni-
trogen, and metals in
[them] than conventional
oil, upgrading and refn-
ing [them] causes a lot
more air and water pollu-
tion and greenhouse gas
emissions,” reports the
Natural Resources De-
fense Council (NRDC),
a leading environmental
non-proft. “On a lifecy-
cle basis—that is, extrac-
tion all the way through
combustion—tar sands
cause about 20 percent
more global warming
pollution than conven-
tional oil,” adds NRDC.
“Oil shale and liquid coal
are even worse, causing
nearly 50 percent more
global warming pollution
and over double the life-
cycle emissions of con-
ventional oil…”
In North America, the
majority of such fuels
come from Canada’s vast
boreal forest, to where
tens of millions of birds
fock each spring to nest.
“Tar sands oil develop-
ment creates open pit
mines, habitat fragmen-
tation, toxic waste hold-
ing ponds, air and water
pollution, upgraders and
refneries, and pipelines
spreading far beyond the
Boreal forest,” reports
NRDC. “This develop-
ment is destroying habi-
tat for waterfowl and
songbirds that come from
all over the Americas to
nest in the Boreal.”
Beyond impacts at
the extraction sites, dirty
fuels cause pollution
problems all down the
line. For this reason, en-
vironmental leaders are
opposed to the proposed
Keystone XL pipeline
which, if approved and
built, would transport
tar sands fuels through
the Midwestern U.S. to
refneries in the Gulf of
Mexico.
“Refnery commu-
nities like Port Arthur,
Texas...are already un-
able to comply with their
air pollution regulations,
so dirtier fuel is the last
thing they need in their
refneries,” adds NRDC.
And while dirty fuels
may reduce our reliance
on foreign oil, they won’t
help reduce gas prices as
they are so expensive to
produce that gas prices
would have to be higher
than they already are in
order for them to be prof-
itable. “They also can’t
help with stabilizing gas
prices in the case of a
disruption to oil ship-
ments because each new
tar sands project requires
huge infrastructure and
capital investments, so
it takes years for new tar
sands projects to come on-
line—it’s not as though
there is loads of spare
tar sands oil just wait-
ing to be put through the
pipelines,” says NRDC’s
Elizabeth Shope.
“The fact is, we don’t
need these fuels,” she
adds. “We can reduce oil
consumption by increas-
ing fuel effciency stan-
dards, and greater use of
hybrid cars, renewable
energy and environmen-
tally sustainable biofu-
els. What’s called ‘smart
growth’—how we design
our communities—is also
a very important element
in meeting our transpor-
tation needs.
“North America
stands at an energy cross-
roads [and] we now face
a choice: to set a course
for a more sustainable
energy future of clean,
renewable fuels, or to de-
velop ever-dirtier sources
of transportation fuel de-
rived from fossil fuels—
at an even greater cost to
our health and environ-
ment.”
EarthTalk® is writ-
ten and edited by Roddy
Scheer and Doug Moss
and is a registered trade-
mark of E - The Environ-
mental Magazine (www.
emagazine.com). Send
questions to: earthtalk@
emagazine.com
reduce risk
protect value
Jim Hubbard is uniquely qualified to understand
your situation and help identify the right
coverage and plans to meet your needs.
Specializing in Crop Hail,
Farm & Ranch, Animal Mortality
and Multi Peril Crop Insurance
(grain sorghum/corn deadline date - March 15, 2014)
(cotton/wheat deadline date - September 30, 2014)
Jim Hubbard
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806.226.3331
jhubbard@naa|y.com
Wonderland Amuse-
ment Park is looking
for area kids and kids at
heart to join the WOW
Crowd!
Several fun-spirited
people will be selected
to be part of the 2014
WOW Crowd. Those
lucky few will appear in
Wonderland’s television
commercials, print ads
and billboards for the
2014 season.
“We’d really like to
see a face from every
town in the Panhandle,”
said Wonderland owner
Paul Borchardt. “Even
though we are located
in Amarillo, we know
visitors come to our park
from all around the area.
We think this would be a
great way to show them
we appreciate their pa-
tronage.”
This is the second year
that Wonderland Amuse-
ment Park has featured
the WOW Crowd in ad-
vertising and they hope
to continue the fun in the
coming years.
WOW Crowd hope-
fuls can enter by sending
their best WOW face,
along with their name,
contact information and
location to WOWus@
WonderlandPark.com.
Visit Wonderland
Park’s website at http://
www. wonderl andpark.
com, or check them out
on Facebook at http://
www. f a c e b o o k . c o m/
WOWWonderland
WOW Crowd casting call for
Wonderland Amusement Park
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
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HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
C
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r

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T
r
e
e
S
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r
v
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e
Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
NOW Taking Credit Cards!
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
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MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
BORGER NEWS-HERALDservice directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Kristie or Mikaela at 273-5611
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
WT Vapors
Great Selection of
eGo-C - Twist
Batteries - Tanks
Atomizers - Vapors
Accessories - Much More!!
722 Weatherly - Borger
www.wtvapors.com
806-274-8874
Like Us On FACEBOOK!!
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
109 S. Main
Borger
806-274-3474
The Body
Shop
Expert Body Repair & Painting
BODY SHOP
Breedlove’s
Auto FX
806-567-6967
Full Auto Detailing
319 Weatherly
AUTO DETAILING
TATTOOS AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
4106 Georgia St. • Amarillo
David Shannon
806-322-3688 • 806-679-3221
Cars • Harleys • Trucks
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
J&D Remodeling
• Tile • Drywal
• Paint (Inside/Out)
• Wod Flor
Refinishing
& Much More..
Free Estimates Call
David at 806-275-0841
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
REMODELING CAREGIVERS
JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
R
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o
f
n
g
, C
o
n
c
r
e
te
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
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k
,
F
lo
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r
in
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CONCRETE CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
1/2 Off Security
Deposit
For the Month
of February
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
On 2 & 3
Bedrooms
Apartments!
806-273-2766
The Good Book Says...
Ask and you shall receive, and
He has never let me down! I
am asking God to help me find
an honest financial partner to
recondition homes in the Borger
area. Money is secured by local
real estate. If you or someone you
know would be interested, please
contact: Charles Hogan
(806)395-6245
or email
charleshogan1@sbcglobal.net
HELP WANTED
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
DEAR ABBY: Can you
be sexually harassed/abused
by your spouse? My husband
talks dirty to me and grabs at
my breasts. I have repeatedly
asked him to stop, but he
doesn’t listen and continues
to do it. We have two small
kids at home, and by the time
they go to bed, I could care
less about being intimate.
His behavior disgusts me,
and to be honest, I don’t want
to have sex with him. I have
female problems and have
told him it hurts, but it makes
no difference to him. He
touches me in front of the
kids, and I have to slap his
hand away.
I can’t leave him because
I don’t have a car or income
for myself, nor do I have
family or friends close by.
I can’t go to his family be-
cause they see him in a dif-
ferent light. What would you
suggest, and is it harassment
-- and could I press charg-
es? -- LEAVE MY AURA
ALONE
DEAR AURA: You have
mentioned so many prob-
lems in your short letter that
it’s hard to know where to
begin. While your husband’s
attempts at foreplay are be-
yond clumsy and ineffective,
I can’t help but feel some
sympathy for him because it
appears you have him on a
starvation diet.
How long this can con-
tinue for either of you is
uncertain. Rather than try
to charge harassment, why
not schedule an appointment
with your gynecologist and
fnd out why having sex is
painful for you. It is not sup-
posed to be, and your doctor
may be able to help you re-
solve the problem. Marriage
counseling might also help,
because it’s clear you and
your husband aren’t commu-
nicating on any meaningful
level.
If these problems are not
resolvable, you can’t contin-
ue living like this and neither
can he. Because your family
isn’t nearby and you have no
transportation, call or write
them and let them know you
may need their help to return.
If they are unable to help you,
contact a domestic abuse
hotline. Unwanted sexual ad-
vances could be considered
harassment, and sex without
consent is rape.
Shopper Is Peeved By
Parents’ Let Kids Chew On
Merchandise
DEAR ABBY: It abso-
lutely frosts me when parents
head for the toy department
so their children will have
something to play with while
they shop. Then, after the kids
have spent time drooling,
teething, sneezing, etc., they
leave the dirty toys at the end
of the aisle for someone else
to buy.
Yesterday I saw a child
sucking on the paw of a
stuffed animal. When I com-
mented on how that must be
the child’s favorite toy, the
mother said it wasn’t theirs --
she was just keeping the little
boy quiet while she shopped.
Last week I stood behind
someone in the checkout line.
In her child’s mouth was the
ribbon from a Mylar balloon.
When the mother fnished
loading her groceries onto the
conveyor belt, she said, “Time
to put this back now!”
It’s my pet peeve: First the
germs they get from sucking
on this stuff, then the ones
everyone else is exposed to
from the child. And on top
of that there’s the stealing,
because I have seen children
break toys.
This is wrong, and we’re
all paying for it. Why can’t
these parents throw some-
thing in the diaper bag before
they leave home? -- PUT IT
DOWN! IN VIRGINIA
DEAR PUT IT DOWN:
Because the parents aren’t
doing their job -- they are
forgetful or lazy, and have
no consideration for the store
owners or other shoppers.
Sadly, parents like the ones
you have described raise
children who are just like
themselves.
Wife weighs charging coarse
husband with harassment
Dear Abby
--
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
THE BORGER NEWS-
HERALD SUGGESTS
that its readers take cau-
tion when calling an
area code beginning
with 809 or a prefix of
011. These are interna-
tional toll numbers and
you will be charged inter-
national long distance
rates. For more informa-
tion and assistance re-
garding the investigation
of work at home opportu-
nities and job lists contact
the Better Business Bu-
reau of South Texas, 609
S International Blvd., We-
slaco, TX 78596. (210)
968-3678.
340 APART. RENTALS
CONTRACTOR SPECIAL!
LIVING SPACE for 20-
40people. Please call 928-
9984 or(806)290-0354
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
BUYING JUNK CARS
wi th good ti tl es and scrap
iron (806)663-6907
290 MISC. WANTED
D I S H T V R E -
T A I L E R . S T A R T -
I N G $19.99/month
(for 12 mos.)
Broadband Inter-
net
starting
$14.95/month
(where availa-
ble.) Ask About
SAME DAY Instal-
lation!
CALL Now! 1-800-
593-2572
230 MISC. FOR SALE
TWIN SIZE BUNKBEDS
FOR sal e! Sti l l i n Pl asti c!
Call (806)595-0322
160 FURNISHINGS
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
i ng, anythi ng you want
done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
PROFESSIONAL HOUSE
CLEANING. MANY Years
Experi ence. Pl ease Cal l
(806)886-6965
110 WORK WANTED
BUSY DOCTORS offi ce
needs recepti oni st. Send
Resume to p.o.box 5130
Borger, Tx-79008
BUSY DOCTORS offi ce
needs part-ti me nurse.
Send Resume to p.o.box
5130 Borger, Tx-79008
090 HELP WANTED
Find what you are looking to buy or sell
in the Borger News-Herald Classifieds.
To place an ad call Jaime at (806) 273-5611
SELL YOUR APPLIANCES,
CARS, HOUSES AND MORE.
$23.
00
3 DAYS
1x1 display ad up to 20 words
SPECIAL
Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main St.
Borger, TX 79007
806-273-5611
BORGER NEWS-HERALD
CLASSIFIED PRICES
DISPLAY ADS:
$9 A COLUMN INCH
FOR ONE DAY (+ $7
EACH DAY AFTER)
BASIC ADS (10 WORDS OR LESS):
$30 - 1 WEEK
$52 - 2 WEEKS
+ $0.70 per word after 10 words
Place a classified for help want-
ed, work wanted, garage sales,
houses for sale/rent, appliances
for sale, and more with the
Borger News-Herald!
Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main St.
Borger, TX 79007
806-273-5611
BORGER NEWS-HERALD
SUBSCRIBE TO THE
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
3 Months - $24
6 Months - $45
12 Months - $90
SENIOR RATES:
3 Months - $19.50
6 Months - $39
12 Months - $78
Find out what is
happening in your
community!
Panhandle Gun
& Knife Show
cooïaç /o
9o-çc-
June 7th & 8th
For Booth Information Call 806-273-5611
and ask for Stephanie Hooper!
Mechanic
Needed:
CoreTerra
Operating is looking
to fill a mechanic’s
position. Must
have experience
in truck, rig and
heavy equipment
repair. Welding and
electrical experience
is preferred.
Employee medical
paid after 90 days.
Apply in person at
2601 W. Kentucky
Ave, Pampa, TX.
(806) 688-9291
Borger ISD Transportation
Now accepting applications for
Full and Part-Time
School Bus Drivers
Mechanic/Technicians
Apply www.borgerisd.net
Need a
Part Time
Maintenance
person for a
new 48 unit
apt. complex.
Apply in person
at 400 E. 10th
St., Borger, Tx.
Large 1 bdrm apartment.
Stove, refrigerator,
AC & Some furniture.
Lighted off-street parking.
Nice quiet neighborhood.
$475, includes utilities.
(806) 273-3343
DEALER’s IS NEEDING A WARE-
HOUSE/COUNTER SALES MUST BE
21 OR OLDER, HAVE VALID DL APPLY
IN PERSON @ 214 N. CEDAR
Large 3 Bedroom
Home Available for
Contractors, Only
$650 per person
including utilities.
Available Saturday
March 1st.
Call 806-273-5557
for details.
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
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$9.07/hr Group Home
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DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
Experience Oilfield
Roustabout Wanted
Near Masterson.
Pay is $13/hr &
up depending
upon experience.
Water truck exp. a
plus! Perm. f/t w/
pd. benefits after
probationary period.
MUST HAVE TX DL!
CDL a Plus! Please
call (806)935-7563.
Hiring a
MACHINIST
with at least
2 years
experience.
Applicants can
Apply in person
at Disco
1400 N. Main
Brierwood Apts.
For Rent
1, 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Castle Dr. Apts.
For Rent
3 bed / 1 bath
Fenced Yard
Call: 273-3982
LABORERS,
SOLDER
TECHNICIANS,
PAINT
SPECIALISTS
NEEDED. Must
have a mechanical
background,
pass background
screenings, & pass all
drug test types. Apply
in person @ 115 W 1st
Street – Fuzzy’s.
10
TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Pictures
Around Town with Don Rice
Girl Scouts Sadie Hamiltion and
Brianna Vass sell Girl Scout Cookies
Boy Scouts visited the Borger News-Herald on Saturday
to see how the printing process works
Borger Bulldogs slide in to to first while
competeing with Dalhart.
Frank Phillips College softball pitcher during the
tournament of games this past weekend.
A great group of West Texas High School fans !
James Reasor and his rock climbing vehicle
ready for the infamous “Sand Drags.”
A pitcher for West Texas High School in
Saturday’s game against Bushland
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