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New hospital set to open next week

October 18, 2011

The new Golden Plains Community Hospital is set to open! A public open house will be held this Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and the facility will start treating patients on Monday, Oct. 24. PHOTO BY DON RICE

The new Golden Plains Community Hospital is set to open next week!
Dennis Jack, CEO of Golden Plains Community Hospital, spoke to the Borger Rotary Club recently about the progress of the new facility. The moving of items from the old facility to the new facility will be taking place this week, with most of the moving taking place this Thursday and Friday.
On Saturday, Oct. 22, a public open house will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tours will be taking place throughout the hospital during those hours.
Jack said during the public open house, citizens will be asked to pick up a BINGO card as they come in, and will take that card to various stations throughout the facility to find out what services the hospital offers. When the card is completed, it can be turned in for the opportunity to win an IPad.
“We want you to hear about all the things we have at the hospital,” he said.
He said the hospital will have a 64-slice CT. He said the CT the hospital currently has works well, but is slow in its operation. The new CT can do a scan from the top of the head to the ankles in 15 seconds.
“Not only can it do it much quicker, but the quality of the pictures is absolutely phenomenal,” Jack said. “What we can do with those pictures once we get them is absolutely phenomenal. We can do 3-D reconstruction of any part of you.”
He said when patients come in to the emergency room with abdominal issues, a lot of times a scan will be needed that requires them to ingest contrast. With the new equipment, Jack said there will be times the contrast will no longer be necessary. The patient can also receive treatment faster because the results will come in much quicker.
Jack said the new hospital will also have a new radiology and fluoroscopy room. The equipment allows a patient to stand on his or her feet while an X-Ray is being taken.
“It allows us to do what is called weight bearing X-Rays. If we suspect you have a broken bone, sometimes it doesn’t show when you’re non-weight bearing,” he said. “If we can get you upright, take the X-Ray, lay you back down, and take the X-Ray again, we can get a comparison. Those bone fractures that are sometimes often hard to see become much more discernible for the X-Ray technicians and the radiologists.”
The hospital also has state-of-the-art operating rooms. Around each OR table, there is a thing known as laminar air flow. Air will be pushed around the patient who is on the table, and the air will go down and out of the room so infections don’t come into the operating room environment and slow down the recovery time of the patient.
There is also a digital camera system with two large monitors in the OR that will allow the doctor to view the work he is doing as it is taking place. The signal from the operating room will also be integrated with the radiology signal to pull up X-Rays as needed during an operation.
All of the patient rooms have 36-inch doors in the bathrooms, and all open outwards. All bathrooms have a sink, toilet, and shower or tub for the patient’s convenience.
The hospital has four LDRP (Labor, Delivery, Recovery, and Postpartum) rooms for expectant mothers. An expectant mother can give birth to her baby, recover, and watch nurses take care of her child without ever leaving the room. To make it more comfortable for the family, Murphy beds are placed in the rooms for those needing rest.
All of these rooms have Jacuzzi tubs in the bathrooms. Right now, the hospital does not have the staff or the capabilities to do water births, but if someone were interested, officials would be willing to discuss it with them.
“I know it’s a big thing in some parts of the world, but I don’t see it being a real requirement in Borger, unless we’re missing some trend that has happened,” Jack said.
Each LDRP room has a large closet to store all of the medical equipment. Once the baby is born, the room will look much more like a bedroom when the equipment is put away.
“We’re going to make it a very nice experience,” Jack said. “A lot of the moms choose to have what we call ‘rooming in’ so that babies don’t sleep in the nursery.”
He also said there is a four-room nursery for babies, along with an isolation room for babies who may be fighting some sort of illness or infection.

(Keep watching the Borger News-Herald this week for more information on the new hospital!)

Source 
Borger News Herald
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