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Monday March 24, 2014

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March 24, 2014

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Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Freya
Burnside
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents “Life is short;
smile while you still
have teeth.”
Mallory Hopkins
Stay
informed
of local news, weather,
sports, and other fun
and interesting events
around
Hutchinson County at
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Sports
Community
Service Directory
Classifeds
Pictures
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Local Masons help
Hutchinson County kids
prevent tooth decay
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
Like us on Facebook for breaking
news and the latest sports scores!
Don’t
Miss
EarthTalk
A Word, Please
with June Casagrande
and
The Week Ahead in
Sports
Inside!
Nearly 400 frst graders
at four elementary schools
in Borger, Fritch, Stinnett,
and Skellytown recently
received free prevent tooth
decay kits through the Fan-
tastic Teeth Fan Club. D.
C. Taylor of Billy Dixon
Masonic Lodge and Mike
Webb of Unity Masonic
Lodge led members in as-
sembling and delivering
kits to the schools.
The Fantastic Teeth
Fan Club, sponsored by
Masonic Home and School
of Texas, strives to prevent
suffering from toothaches,
reduce missed school days
due to dental problems, and
cut costs for dental treat-
ment.
Prevent tooth de-
cay kits contain: a tooth-
brush, toothpaste, dental
foss, healthy teeth sticker,
two-minute timer (optimal
brushing time), Tips for
Healthy Teeth educational
info for parents in both
Spanish and English, and a
summary of MHS services.
According to Oral
Health In America: A Re-
port of the Surgeon Gen-
eral, tooth decay is the sin-
gle most common chronic
childhood disease—fve
times more common than
asthma and seven times
more common than hay
fever. Poor children are
affected by this epidemic
more frequently than other
children, with nearly 12
times more restricted-activ-
ity days due to dental issues
than children from higher-
income families. With more
than 1.5 million Texas chil-
dren living in poverty, there
is a great need for preven-
tive dental care.
Dental problems
also directly affect success
for children, with more than
51 million school hours lost
each year to dental-relat-
ed illness. Teachers have
judged both classroom per-
formance and classroom
behavior to be signifcantly
poorer among children in
need of dental care. Pain
and suffering due to un-
treated dental disease can
also lead to problems in eat-
ing and speaking.
Masonic Home and
School of Texas (MHS) is a
non-proft organization with
a history of helping chil-
dren across Texas for more
than 100 years. Contact
MHS by calling toll-free
1.877.203.9111; sending an
email to info@mhstx.org;
or by visiting the website,
www.mhstx.org.
Submitted
Sponsored By: Golden Plains Community
Hospital - 100 Medical Dr,
Borger, TX 79007 - (806) 467-5700
DAILY GOOD DEED
Take a walk
instead of
driving today
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 70, 10 Pages
Monday, March 24, 2014
Mobile Vet Center to
Visit Hutchinson County
Free Health Fair
Amarillo Mobile
Vet Center will be at
the Hutchison county
free health fair located
at Frank Phillips Col-
lege BCAC 1301 W.
Roosevelt Borger TX on
April 10, 2014 between
the hours of 9:00 AM and
3:00 PM to provide edu-
cation about readjustment
counseling services of-
fered at Vet Centers. All
War Zone Vets qualify for
counseling services. Ac-
tive duty personnel and
War Zone Vets with Post
Traumatic Stress Disorder
or Military Sexual Trau-
ma may receive care at
any Vet Center or MVC.
We provide 3 sessions to
Non-War Zone Vets for
information and referrals.
Certain families of ac-
tive duty service men and
women who have died
while on active duty may
qualify for bereavement
services. Other services
offered include:
Individual, group, and
family readjustment coun-
seling to assist active duty
service members in mak-
ing a successful transition
from combat, to garrison,
or civilian life.
Post-traumatic stress
disorder (PTSD) treat-
ment and help with other
related problems that af-
fect functioning within
the family, work, school
or other areas of everyday
life.
Military sexual trauma
counseling for active duty
service members of both
genders.
Service members and
Veterans will be required
to provide documentation
by their third visit indi-
cating they have served
in a combat or war zone
to continue counseling. A
copy of one of the follow-
ing documents will meet
this requirement: DD214,
deployment demobiliza-
tion order, enlisted record
brief, offcer record brief,
or an award citation in-
dicating service member
served in a combat zone.
These services are also
available to family mem-
bers of active duty com-
bat service members as
well as family members
of combat Veterans.
For more information
please contact the Ama-
rillo Vet Center, 3414
Olsen Blvd, Amarillo TX
79109. Phone: 806-354-
9779
In addition to its regu-
lar operating hours Mon-
day-Friday, from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m., the Amarillo
Vet Center has extended
hours three nights a week
(Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday) until 8 p.m.
Submitted
Your Local Weather
Mon
3/24
60/31
Some clouds
in the morn-
ing will give
way to
mainly sunny
skies for the
afte.
Tue
3/25
60/39
Sunny. Highs
in the low
60s and lows
in the upper
30s.
Wed
3/26
64/48
Windy with
some sun,
scattered
thunder-
storms.
Thu
3/27
76/37
Windy with a
mix of sun
and clouds.
Fri
3/28
65/34
More sun
than clouds.
Highs in the
mid 60s and
lows in the
mid 30s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
Left: John Garrard
of VFW Post 1789
presents a check for
$500.00 to Selena Mc-
Clellen of Living Wa-
ters in Borger
Far left: John Gar-
rard of VFW Post 1789
donatesa check for
$500.00 to Jim WiIl-
liams representing
the Sanford Volunteer
Fire Department
VFW Post #1789 donates to SVFD and Living Waters
MONDAY,
MARCH 24, 2014 Borger News- Herald
2
Obituaries
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
The community wide
health fair will be held on
Thursday, April 10th and
will be a free event for
area residents. This year’s
health fair will feature sev-
eral new demonstrations
as well as free screenings
and information booths.
All are designed to help
attendees have a better un-
derstanding about health
care and health and safety
practices.
New demonstrations
will feature a child safety
seat check. The person at-
tending should have their
safety seat in their vehicle
and the installation of the
seat will be checked for
installation accuracy. In
order to take part in this
demonstration, appoint-
ments will be necessary
and may be made by call-
ing the Texas Agri Life
Offce at 806-878-4026.
There will also be a limit-
ed number of seats which
will be made available for
free. Participants again,
must call for an appoint-
ment and must have their
vehicle present for instal-
lations of the seat and also
the child who will be oc-
cupying the seat.
Xcel Energy will be
present with the Electrical
Arching Demonstration
which is intended to teach
awareness of electrical
safety. This demonstra-
tion will run at various
times throughout the day.
Teen Texting and Driv-
ing will be a simulated ac-
tivity which will focus on
the dangers of texting and
driving. This is not lim-
ited to teens but to all to
gain an understanding of
the critical dangers of tex-
ting while in the driver’s
seat.
Drunk Driving will
be featured in a simulated
activity to help those par-
ticipating experience the
effects of a drunk driver.
Many booths featur-
ing screenings and health
information will be pro-
vided throughout the day.
The health fair will open
at 8:30 a.m. for fasting
blood draws and will end
at 2:30 p.m. Mark your
calendar and make plans
to attend this informative
day designed to improve
your health and safety
knowledge.
Health Fair to feature
new demonstrations
Submitted
Kristly Slough, County Extension Agent, demonstrates the correct way to install a child safety
seat. This service will be available at the Health Fair, April 10th, by appointment only. Call 806-
878-4026 to book a time.
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Local Weather
Temperatures below average are going to continue to be the trend across the
High Plains as we begin the new work and school week. Expect highs to journey
into the upper 50s by late day under a bright sky. A weak cold front will drop
through in the afternoon swinging our southwesterly morning winds at 10-20
mph around to the northeast. Winds speeds will briefy ramp up to the 15-25
mph with the passage of the front before settling back down in the evening.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Brian James
Randy Earl Miller, 55, passed away Sunday,
March 23, 2014.
Funeral service will be held 10 am Wednesday, March
26, 2014 in the Minton Memorial Chapel. Burial will fol-
low in Westlawn Memorial Park under the direction of Minton
Chatwell Funeral Directors. The family will receive guests on
Tuesday at the funeral home from 5-7pm.
Randy was born August 1, 1958 in Borger to Earl and
Sammie Miller. He was a mechanic for Phillips Petroleum
Company for 35 years. Randy married the love of his life,
Cindy Dobbs, on December 27, 1979 in Fritch. He taught
Shotokan Karate, was a 2nd degree black belt and enjoyed scuba diving. Randy was a mem-
ber of Hutchinson County Sheriff’s Posse. He had a passion for tinkering, riding his Harley
Davidson Ultra, dirt bikes, driving hot rods or anything with a motor. Randy was also a gun
enthusiast and lovingly known as Pops to his grandkids.
Survivors include his wife, Cindy of the home; sons, Jered Miller and his wife, Carrie,
Judd Miller and his wife, Candice all of Amarillo; three grandchildren, Maverick, Shiah and
Raedyn; and sister, Kathie Sarchet of Amarillo.
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Marjorie Ann Long, 84, passed away Satur-
day, March 22, 2014.
Funeral service will be held 3 pm Tuesday, March 25, 2014
at Celebration Family Church in Fritch. Burial will follow
in Westlawn Memorial Park under the direction of Minton
Chatwell Funeral Directors of Borger. In lieu of fowers her
memory may be honored with a gift to BSA Hospice of Pam-
pa, 800 N Sumner St, Pampa, Texas 79065.
Marjorie was born March 7, 1930 in Vernon, Texas to Hen-
ry and Thelma Ross. She married G.W. Long on October 28,
1947 in Vernon.
She is preceded in death by her parents; grandson, Doug Long; and sister, Vonnie Talor.
Survivors include her husband, G.W. of the home; children, Ronald Long and his wife
Debra, Debbie Jennings and her husband, Mike, Susan Holland and her husband, Joe, Delwin
Long and his wife, Lyndol all of Borger; thirteen grandchildren; sixteen great grand children;
one great great grandchild due to arrive in June; brother, H.L. Ross and his wife, Shirley of
Decatur, Texas; sister, Myrtle Willliams and her husband, Dee of Eldorado, Texas.
J.R. Elton Triplett was born December 18, 1926
in Healdton, Oklahoma and died March 21, 2014, at 87 years
of age. J.R. was preceded in death by his mother, Lilly Mae
and his father, Lawson Triplett; sisters, Lucille and Mable;
brothers, Loys (Buck), Elzie (Doc) and Kenneth.
J.R. began school in Tishomingo, Ok and the family moved
to Olustee, Ok when he was in the third grade. He grew up
loving hunting and fshing.
In June 1945, J.R. entered the Army and received training
at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas and Camp Maxey at Paris, Texas.
He served in Pacifc Theater of Operations. His unit, the 46th
Engineers Construction Battalion arrived in Yokohama Harbor and was sent to Sendai, Japan.
Later they were sent to Tokyo to help with reconstruction. His decorations and citations in-
clude Asiatic-Pacifc Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal and Army of Occupation
Medal.
After getting out of the Army he went back to Altus and worked for Wilson and Co. In
1951, he married Elsie Cain and they continued to live in Altus. In 1955, Elsie and J.R. moved
to Fritch, Texas, where he went to work for Natural Gas Pipeline Company. In December
1955 their daughter, Sheila Yvonne was born. Elsie died in 1956.
In 1957, J.R. married Jewell Lookadoo of Fritch who had two children, Linda and Frank.
Jewell also work for Natural Gas and they both continued to work there until they retired.
Jewell and J.R. were married for 53 years until her death on January 26, 2011. J.R. and Jewell
made a great team as community and church volunteers. There was never a job too big or too
small for them to tackle. If there was a need within the community of Fritch, they were there
to lend a hand. In 1994, Jewell and J.R. were chosen by KVII Channel 7 television in Ama-
rillo as members of their “Seven Who Care” volunteer team. These volunteers were chosen
from a list submitted by members of their community. J.R. had a high energy level and with a
hammer, nails and saw could build almost anything any organization needed.
J.R. is survived by his daughters, Sheila Mick and her husband, Terry of Briscoe, TX and
Linda Lookadoo of Fritch; also his son, Frank Lookadoo and his wife, Mary from Mineola,
TX. He has six living grandchildren and numerous great grandchildren, plus nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral service will be held at 10 am Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at Calvary Baptist Church
in Borger. Burial will follow at 12 noon in Memorial Park Cemetery in Amarillo under the
direction of Minton Chatwell Funeral Directors of Fritch. The family will receive guests on
Monday, March 24, 2014 from 6-8 pm at the funeral home in Fritch. Memorials may be made
to Alzheimer’s Association, 1400 Wallace Blvd., Amarillo, TX 79106.
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Minton • Chatwell
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
274-7333
Betty Lou Deaton, 85, passed away Friday,
March 21, 2014.
Funeral service will be held Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at
2:00 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Borger, Rev. Andy Dietz,
1st Baptist Groom, will offciate. Burial will follow at West-
lawn Memorial Park under the direction of Minton Chatwell
Funeral Directors of Borger.
Betty was born July 10, 1928 in Ada, Oklahoma to Wil-
liam and Beatrice Grisham. She married Verlie Deaton on
June 15, 1946 in Ada, Oklahoma.
She is preceded in death by her parents; brother, Bill Grisham; and two nieces.
Survivors include her husband, V.E. of the home; sons, Gary Deaton and his wife, Edwina
of Oklahoma City, Leslie Deaton and his wife, Diane of Fritch; daughter, Donna Mesneak and
her husband, Jimmy of Fritch; ten grandchildren, Alan and Trayce Mesneak, Aaron Mesneak,
Cindy and Steve Fullbright, Drew and Kandi Deaton, Ben and Jami Deaton, Rachel Deaton;
eleven great grandchildren, Lauren, Andrew, Zach, Carson, Truman, Grace, Isabella, Reese,
Rigby, Barrett and Raylee.
The family will be gathering at 8746 Hwy 136.
April 5
Kiwanis Club of Borger
will host their annual
Pancake Breakfast from 6
am to noon in the Frank
Phillips College Cafeteria.
Take outs available. Con-
tact Denise Klotz for more
information at 395-3468
April 10
Hutchinson County Health
Fair, 9 am to 2:30 pm at
the Frank Phillips BCAC,
1301 W. Roosevelt St.,
Free admission, fasting
blood sugar screenings
starting at 8:30 am
April 28-May 7
American Red Cross Life-
guarding Training Courses,
6 pm - 8:30 pm at the
BCAC. Call Susie Graves
at (806) 878-2537 or (806)
584-6512 for a spot!
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100
S. Hedgecoke, Borger. Call
273-5621 or 857-3947 for
more information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian
Church, 200 S. Bryan, 6
p.m. Call 806-382-2449
or 806-273-6017 for more
information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist
Church Borger Fellowship
Hall 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. child care is provided.
Call FBC 263-5621 for
information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medi-
cal Field Employees in
Hutchinson County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College
Cafeteria in the Gallery
Room For more informa-
tion call Aileen Jackson at
274-9890or Betty Jordon
at 857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Pres-
byterian Church, 418 W.
Coolidge, 8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more
information.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100
S. Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Genea-
logical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, sec-
ond floor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6
p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you
write poetry and want to
connect with other poets to
connect with other po-
ets, read and get positive
feedback we would like to
form a lunch group and/
or an evening group. If
interested please call Mary
Zan at 857-3670 for more
information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for
life challenges, 6:30 p.m.,
That One Place Com-
munity Center, 212 E.
Broadway, Fritch. Call
275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria
Call 274-3321 for more
information.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9
a.m. Call 886-0299 for
more information.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stin-
nett Senior Citizen Build-
ing, 6:30 p.m. Call 878-
2960 or 878-3272 for more
information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Minis-
try, 7 p.m. Call 857-3975
for location.
Alibates Creek Indian
Dancers, 7 p.m., Trinity
Lutheran Church, 212 W.
Jefferson. Call 274-3239
for more information.
VFW Post #1789 meets at
the VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden
Plains Community Hos-
pital Board Room, 1 p.m.
Call 467-5732 for more
information.
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure and blood sugar
screenings, Opportunities
Center, 11 a.m. to noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce,
6:30 p.m. Call 806-878-
4026.
Vietnam Veterans of
America Chapter 404, 403
S Cornell in Fritch, 5:30
p.m. dinner and 6:00 meet-
ings. Call 857-3950 for
more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure screenings, MAL’S
Café, Stinnett, 8 a.m. to 9
a.m.
Phillips Alumni Associa-
tion, Frank Phillips Col-
lege Gallery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post
0671 meets at 7:30 pm
at the American Legion
post next to the Aluminum
Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospi-
tal Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more
information.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art
10:30-12 St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s wel-
come, Doors open 5 pm,
Cards sold starting at 6
p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm,
$14 each packet of 13
games or 6 papers for each
of 13 games,
Additional papers half
packets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more
information.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge,
7:30 p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost
Children Grief Support
Group, New U on Main
Street, 7 p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more
information.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen Sun-
shine Club, 12 noon for
lunch followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m., 305 N. Deahl. Call
273-7127 or see fellow-
shipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home
Health Care, blood pres-
sure and blood sugar
screenings, Fritch Sun-
shine Club, 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Sup-
port Group, Perryton
Mennonite Church, 2821
S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens
Club potluck dinner, busi-
ness meeting, games at
noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
United Supermarket, 9
a.m. to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class,
10 a.m., Golden Plains
Community Hospital
Board Room. Call 467-
5718 or 467-5857 for more
information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Call 878-2597 for
more information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor
Home Owners Assoc., 10
a.m., Club House.
Marine Corps League
Hawthorne Det. #1349, 9
a.m., 421 E. Broadway,
Stinnett.
Young adults Christian
marriage class, Word
of Life Church, 9:45
a.m.Sundays, Wednesdays,
Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcot-
ics Anonymous, Valley
Drive west entrance, Cedar
Street, 7:30 p.m. Call 806-
570-2028 or 857-4038 for
more information
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
MONDAY,
MARCH 24, 2014
Borger News- Herald
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274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
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3
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I were both mar-
ried previously. We have
been together for seven
years.
When we first started
dating, we would some-
times go to one of the ca-
sinos after dinner as a fun
outing. We never spent
much money and went
only occasionally. Our
game of choice was the
slot machine.
Over the last few years,
it seems like the casino
has taken over our lives.
We go there to the exclu-
sion of almost everything
else and spend money we
can’t afford to lose. We
both have the mentality
that the “big win” is right
around the corner.
How can we break
this habit? It’s causing
unbearable financial and
emotional stress in our
marriage. I’m afraid it
won’t last another year. --
IN OVER MY HEAD IN
NEW YORK
DEAR IN OVER
YOUR HEAD: In case
you are not aware, there is
a name for the habit you
and your husband have
acquired. It’s “compulsive
gambling,” and it’s an ad-
diction in much the same
way as the abuse of alco-
hol or drugs. Fortunately,
you have finally reached a
point where you have re-
alized this “fun outing” is
out of control.
Gamblers Anonymous
can help you break this
destructive cycle. It’s a
12-step program based on
the principles of Alcohol-
ics Anonymous. Its mem-
bers support one another
by sharing their strength
and experiences with one
another. The website is
www. gambl er s anony-
mous.org.
Many people have ex-
perienced what you’re go-
ing through, and this well-
established organization
has helped them. To locate
a meeting near you, visit
the website or check your
telephone directory.
DEAR ABBY: My mom
and stepfather are divorc-
ing. They were married
for 25 years. He was al-
ways a great father figure
to me and has been a very
active grandfather to my
children. The reason for
the divorce is his infidel-
ity and the disrespect he
has shown my mother.
We are his only fam-
ily, and he wants to be
involved with us as if
nothing is different,
even showing up at fam-
ily gatherings. I want to
be loyal to my mother --
and I do feel he betrayed
us -- but I still recognize
that he has also been good
to me and the kids. He
doesn’t deserve to be cut
out of our lives. How does
one handle a situation like
this? -- SEEING THE BIG
PICTURE
DEAR SEEING: Your
stepdad may want to pre-
tend that nothing is dif-
ferent, but something IS
different. He hurt your
mother so badly they will
no longer be married.
If you want to be loyal
to your mother and still
have a relationship with
him, then you need to
have a talk with him. Ex-
plain that because he is
no longer married to your
mother, he will no longer
be invited to family gath-
erings where your mother
will be present. Be sure to
tell him you regard him
with affection, but will be
seeing him separately for
the foreseeable future.
Fun Outings at the Casino Become Costly Compulsion
Dear Abby
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
It is time for Borger
to select a Citizen of the
Year.
For 23 years the Borg-
er Chamber of Commerce
has honored a local citi-
zen by selecting them as
Citizen of the Year. The
general public is encour-
aged to submit nomina-
tions for this award.
A nominee may be
from an organization or
from the community at
large. Nominations must
be submitted stating the
reason(s), accomplish-
ments and merits of the
nominee. The nomina-
tion may be submitted
with the person’s ac-
complishments in one
document or several may
write to the accomplish-
ments.
All nominations must
be submitted to the Borg-
er Chamber of Commerce
at 613 N. Main no later
than Noon on Friday,
March 14th.
Nominations may
also be mailed to P. O.
Box 490, Borger, Texas
79007, or may be e-
mailed to borgercham-
ber@amaonline.com or
faxed to 806-273-3488.
An awards committee
will make the selection
for the honor.
Helping nominate a
person for Citizen of the
Year is a wonderful way
to applaud that person for
the work they have done
in our community.
For more information
on submitting a nomi-
nation, please call the
Borger Chamber of Com-
merce at 274-2211. The
Citizen of the Year will
be announced at the An-
nual Chamber of Com-
merce Banquet on Thurs-
day, March 27, at the
BCAC on the Frank Phil-
lips College Campus.
Borger Chamber of Commerce
seeking Citizen of the Year nominations
MONDAY,
MARCH 24, 2014
Borger News- Herald
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Mail letters to:
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4
Opinion
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2012
Note: The views and opinions expressed on this page are solely the views and
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the Borger News-Herald or any of its employees.
TODAY IN HISTORY
1603 – James VI of Scot-
land also becomes James I of
England, upon the death of
Elizabeth I.
1663 – The Province of
Carolina is granted by char-
ter to eight Lords Proprietor
in reward for their assistance
in restoring Charles II of
England to the throne.
1707 – The Acts of Union
1707 is signed, offcially
uniting the Kingdoms of
England and Scotland to cre-
ate the Kingdom of Great
Britain.
1721 – Johann Sebastian
Bach dedicated six concer-
tos to Christian Ludwig,
margrave of Brandenburg-
Schwedt, now commonly
called the Brandenburg con-
certos, BWV 1046-1051.
1765 – American Revolu-
tion: The Kingdom of Great
Britain passes the Quartering
Act that requires the Thirteen
Colonies to house British
troops.
1829 – Catholic Emanci-
pation: The Parliament of the
United Kingdom passes the
Roman Catholic Relief Act
1829, allowing Catholics to
serve in Parliament.
1832 – In Hiram, Ohio a
group of men beat, tar and
feather Mormon leader Jo-
seph Smith.
1837 – Canada gives Af-
rican Canadian men the right
to vote.
1860 – Sakuradamon in-
cident: Assassination of Jap-
anese Chief Minister (Tairō)
Ii Naosuke.
1878 – The British frigate
HMS Eurydice sinks, killing
more than 300.
1882 – Robert Koch an-
nounces the discovery of
mycobacterium tuberculosis,
the bacterium responsible for
tuberculosis.
1885 – Sino-French War:
Chinese victory in the Battle
of Bang Bo on the Tonkin-
Guangxi border.
1896 – A. S. Popov makes
the frst radio signal trans-
mission in history.
1900 – Mayor of New
York City Robert Anderson
Van Wyck breaks ground for
a new underground “Rapid
Transit Railroad” that would
link Manhattan and Brook-
lyn.
1907 – The frst issue
of the Georgian Bolshevik
newspaper Dro is published.
1922 – Irish War of Inde-
pendence: In Belfast, North-
ern Irish policemen break
into the home of a Catholic
family and shoot all eight
males inside.
1927 – Nanking Incident:
Foreign warships bombard
Nanjing, China, in defense
of the foreign citizens within
the city.
1934 – United States Con-
gress passes the Tydings–
McDuffe Act allowing the
Philippines to become a self-
governing commonwealth.
1944 – Ardeatine mas-
sacre: German troops mur-
der 335 Italian civilians in
Rome.
1944 – World War II: In an
event later dramatized in the
movie The Great Escape, 76
Allied prisoners of war begin
breaking out of the German
camp Stalag Luft III.
1946 – The British Cabi-
net Mission, consisting of
Lord Pethick-Lawrence, Sir
Stafford Cripps and A. V.
Alexander, arrives in India
to discuss and plan for the
transfer of power from the
British Raj to Indian leader-
ship.
1958 – Rock’N’Roll teen
idol Elvis Presley is drafted
in the U.S. Army.
1959 – The Party of
the African Federation is
launched by Léopold Sédar
Senghor and Modibo Keïta.
1965 – NASA spacecraft
Ranger 9, equipped to con-
vert its signals into a form
suitable for showing on do-
mestic television, brings
images of the Moon into or-
dinary homes before crash
landing.
1972 – The United King-
dom imposes direct rule over
Northern Ireland.
1973 – Kenyan athlete
Kip Keino defeats Jim Ryun
at the frst-ever professional
track meet in Los Angeles.
1976 – In Argentina, the
armed forces overthrow the
constitutional government of
President Isabel Perón and
start a 7-year dictatorial pe-
riod self-styled the National
Reorganization Process.
Since 2006, a public holiday
known as Day of Remem-
brance for Truth and Justice
is held on this day.
1980 – Archbishop Óscar
Romero is killed while cel-
ebrating Mass in San Salva-
dor.
1986 – The Loscoe gas
explosion leads to new UK
laws on landfll gas migra-
tion and gas protection on
landfll sites.
1989 – Exxon Valdez
oil spill: In Prince William
Sound in Alaska, the Exxon
Valdez spills 240,000 barrels
(38,000 m3) of petroleum af-
ter running aground.
1993 – Discovery of
Comet Shoemaker–Levy 9.
1998 – Jonesboro mas-
sacre: Mitchell Johnson
and Andrew Golden, aged
11 and 13 respectively, fre
upon teachers and students
at Westside Middle School
in Jonesboro, Arkansas; fve
people are killed and ten are
wounded.
1998 – A tornado sweeps
through Dantan in India kill-
ing 250 people and injuring
3000 others.
1999 – Mont Blanc Tun-
nel fre kills 39 people.
1999 – Kosovo War:
NATO commences aerial
bombardment against Yugo-
slavia, marking the frst time
NATO has attacked a sover-
eign country.
2000 – S&P 500 index
reaches an intraday high of
1,552.87, a peak that, due
to the collapse of the dot-
com bubble, it will not reach
again for another seven-and-
a-half years.
2003 – The Arab League
votes 21-1 in favor of a reso-
lution demanding the im-
mediate and unconditional
removal of U.S. and British
soldiers from Iraq.
2008 – Bhutan offcially
becomes a democracy, with
its frst ever general election.
Are you interested in writing a column
for the newspaper? Let us know!
Send your ideas to
editor@borgernewsherald.com
and they could be considered for publication!
Note: The Borger News-Herald cannot offer
compensation to columnists at this time.
Your Column Here!
Most of the questions
people ask me are easy. Can
you use “nauseous” as a syn-
onym of “nauseated” to mean
“sick feeling”? The answer is
right in the dictionary under
the listing for “nauseous,”
and that answer is yes. Is it
true you’re not supposed to
end a sentence with a prepo-
sition? No, that’s a myth, as
any grammar reference from
Fowler’s to Strunk and White
will quickly prove. Can you
use “their” to refer to a sin-
gular person even though it’s
supposed to be plural? Again,
the answer is right in the dic-
tionary. Yes, according to the
entry for that word, you can.
But recently I had to feld
some questions that aren’t so
easy. They came via a Twitter
chat hosted by Copyediting.
com and attended mostly by
working copy editors. A lot
of their questions eschewed
the easy “can you?” business
to focus on a tougher ques-
tion: Should you?
Take for example “their,”
which one user asked about.
As noted above, the diction-
ary allows its use as a singu-
lar. So you can say, “Every
attendee should lock their
car” with the normally plural
“their” referring to the singu-
lar “attendee.”
But should you? That’s
another matter entirely. Most
people who know their stuff
would probably agree that
“his or her” is better in this
sentence. So a lot of edi-
tors, myself included, would
change that to read “Every
attendee should lock his or
her car.” But in passages
where the need for a gender-
neutral pronoun comes up
a lot, this approach gets old
fast. You can only say “he or
she,” “his or hers” and “him
and her” so many times in
a single paragraph before
it becomes a mess working
against the reader. In these
cases, I answered, every edi-
tor has to make a judgment
call, factoring in context,
readability, the formality of
the piece and the sensibilities
of the target reader.
Sentence-ending preposi-
tions pose another “should
I?” conundrum for editors.
It’s a myth that you can’t
end a sentence with a prepo-
sition, but it’s a very wide-
spread myth. So when you
do, some people will think
you’re wrong. That could ex-
plain the following passage,
which I came across in the
Los Angeles Times: “Pasa-
dena techies band together
to relaunch the city as a tech
hub with which to be reck-
oned.” See how the editor
or writer fipped around the
well-known term “to be reck-
oned with” so the preposition
“with” wouldn’t come at the
end? Interesting choice. Cer-
tainly not one I would have
made. But it illustrates how
the “should I?” question
plagues everyone.
Perhaps the biggest
“should I?” conundrum in
English involves “whom”
and its cousin “whomever.”
The pronoun “whom,” ex-
perts agree, is reserved for
formal writing and speech.
But those experts don’t defne
“formal.” They leave that up
to us. If you deem a written
piece to be informal, there’s
nothing wrong with using
“who” as an object pronoun,
as in “The man, who we will
call Joe, gave a report.” In
more formal contexts, that
would be “whom.”
But “whom” is risky. If
you start using it, you should
be consistent throughout the
piece. And when “whom” or
“whomever” appears in the
middle of a sentence, the av-
erage writer doesn’t realize
he may be in over his head.
For example, here’s a sen-
tence penned by a friend of
mine: “A free meal and much
gratitude goes to whomever
volunteers.” My friend made
the mistake of thinking that
“whomever” is the object of
the preposition “to.” It’s not.
The object of the preposition
is the whole clause that fol-
lows, complete with the verb
“volunteers.” Clauses need
subjects. So “whoever,” a
subject pronoun, would have
been correct. “Whomever,”
an object pronoun, was not.
Had my friend just gone
for the less formal “who-
ever,” he would have gotten
it right by accident. So if the
“should I?” question involves
“whom,” the answer is: Only
if you’re sure you know how
to use it.
-- June Casagrande is
the author of “It Was the
Best of Sentences, It Was the
Worst of Sentences.” She can
be reached at JuneTCN@
aol.com.
A Word, Please
June Casagrande
Guest Columnist
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
This is your strong time
because the Sun is in your sign.
You can replenish your energy
and attract good situations and
powerful people to you.
TAURUS (April 20 to May
20)
It’s totally appropriate to
work behind the scenes for the
next few weeks. That’s because
it’s your time to plan your next
year.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Remember to seek others
out. Work with others. Help
others. This is because all your
associations with other people
will beneft you. This applies
for the next several weeks.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
In the month ahead, you will
easily make a great impression
on bosses, parents, teachers
and VIPs. You won’t have to
do anything special to please
them. Grab this opportunity!
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Look for ways to get further
education and training in the
next month. How can you
broaden your horizons through
travel and meeting different
people?
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
You’ll be surprised at how
intense you feel about things
for the next few weeks. This
could be hot for romance
but dicey for disputes about
property.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Remember that you need
more rest in the next few
weeks. Learn what you
can about your closest
relationships.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov.
21)
Act on your desire to get
better organized because this is
what you want to do. You want
to have a home for everything
and everything in its place. Get
busy!
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21)
The next few weeks are party
city for you. Enjoy playful
times with children, sports
events, vacations, the arts,
movies, the theater and fun,
entertaining diversions.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to
Jan. 19)
Your focus continues to be
on home, family and domestic
matters for the next several
weeks. Interaction with a
parent could be signifcant.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18)
This is a busy time for you
now and in the next several
weeks. You’ve got places to
go, things to do and people to
see. Some of you will read and
write more than usual as well.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20)
Although you’re focused on
money and earnings in the next
few weeks, at a deeper level
you are wondering about your
values. What really matters?
You have to know this in order
to make wise decisions.
MONDAY,
MARCH 24, 2014
Borger News- Herald Comics
5
Borger News- Herald
Sports
6
MONDAY,
MARCH 24 2014
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
SPORTS
MONDAY, APRIL 15
TUESDAY, APRIL 16
FRIDAY, APRIL 19
SATURDAY, APRIL 20
BORGER TRACK @ CANYON - 1-3A/2-3A AREA MEET
FPC BASEBALL VS. ODESSA COLLEGE - 12:00 (DH)
BORGER SOFTBALL (V) VS. RIVER ROAD - 4:30 (JV AFTER)
FPC SOFTBALL VS. CLARENDON COLLEGE - 5:00 (DH)
FPC BASEBALL VS. ODESSA COLLEGE - 12:00 (DH)
BORGER BASEBALL (V) VS. RIVER ROAD - 12:00
FPC SOFTBALL @ CLARENDON COLLEGE - 1:00 (DH)
BORGER BASEBALL (JV) VS. RIVER ROAD - 2:30
WTHS BASEBALL (V) VS. BOOKER - 4:30
BORGER GIRLS GOLF @ LUBBOCK - REGIONALS
BROUGHT TO YOU BY:
W. H. HANK LANDERS, M.D.
Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine
50 Medical Drive
Borger, TX • 806-274-3645
GO BULLDOGS!
THE WEEK AHEAD IN
MONDAY, March 24
Borger Golf in Dumas
TUESDAY, March 25
WEDNESDAY, March 26
THURSDAY, March 27
West Texas High Boys/Girls Golf TBD
West Texas High Tennis @ Spearman
FRIDAY, March 28
Track Rocket Relays @ Wellington (Area Schools)
Hereford Invitational Track @ Hereford
Tennis Sandie Cup In Amarillo
SATURDAY, March 29
Borger Baseball @ HOME Noon, 2:30, 5:30
Borger Softball @ HOME 10 am
SUNDAY, March 30
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Our Lady Plainsmen
had a great weekend
West Texas High wins again
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Frank Phillips College
softball tem took on El Paso
Community College Friday
in El Paso, Texas. What a
long trip. But it was worth
it since the girls came home
with the win!
Their frst game was a win
with the fnal score of FPC
7 and EPCC 4. Some of the
games highlights and top
players are...
WP: Kendra Sinclair (2-
7)
RBI: Kelly Ayala (2),
Trinidad Barrera, Erica
Chasco, Des’ree Wainright
SB: Lesa Murphy, Kelly
Ayala, Trinidad Barrera,
Bernadette Garcia, Erica
Chasco, Des’ree Wainright
(2), Danielle Acevedo, Vic-
toria Amaya (2)
The Lady Plainsmen team
was 10/12 in stolen bases
which is a single game re-
cord for FPC!
Then game two proved
to be an even better win for
Frank Phillips College with
a fnal score of FPC 8 and
EPCC 2. Here are some of
the highlights and top play-
ers of this game....
WP: Victoria Amaya (1-
3)
RBI: Lesa Murphy, Ashley
Hight (2), Bernadette Garcia
(2), Des’ree Wainright
SB: Lesa Murphy, Berna-
dette Garcia (2), Erica Chas-
co, Victoria Amaya (2)
FPC on the day was 16/19
on stolen base attempts which
is a single day record.
Frank Phillips College has
a record of 7-20, 3-3 in con-
ference after these games.
Saturday’s games in El
Paso also went well for the
Lady Plainsmen.
The frst game only lasted
six innings and Frank Phil-
lips left the feld with the win
at 9-1.
WP: Kendra Sinclair (3-
7)
RBI: Erica Chasco (3),
Danielle Acevedo (2), Ber-
nadette Garcia (2), Ashley
Hight
Saturday’s second game
just didn’t go as well for the
Lady Plainsmen. The fnal
score of 5-12 in the sixth in-
ning turned the win over to
EPCC.
LP: Kendra Sinclair (3-8)
RBI: Lesa Murphy, Kelly
Ayala
They only had one stolen
base on the day today which
ties the Frank Phillips Col-
lege season record of 57 in
one season.
West Texas High School
softball team played host
to McLean in a conferance
game on Saturday.
The Lady Comanches
have been having a stupen-
dous season! The girls have
been giving it their all and is
sure is paying off for them.
If they can keep this up, they
could be the top in district.
The top performers in
this game was... Erin Sum-
mers with 2 for 2 3 RBI’s
... Mackenzie Bevins also
with 2 for 2 2 RBI’s ... Dan-
ielle Heater again with 2 for
2 2RBI’s 7 strike-outs and
gave up 2 hits .... and Jordan
Tucker with 2 for 2 2 RBI’s.
Great job girls in winning
this conferance game with
the fnal score of 16 - 1.
The Borger High School Lady Bulldog varsity soccer team played a great
game on Saturday against Canyon. The frst half and part of the second half
was when they played their best.
They did a good job in moving the ball up the feld. Canyon made an ad-
justment by adding a stopper to their formation in an attempt to try to stop the Lady Bulldogs high powered
offence. They still had trouble dealing with the speed of our Bulldogs wings. They did have a little trouble at
one time with their midfeld not creating speed and bunching up.
They were able to score in the frst half with a goel by Victoria Nunez. She juked a defender and then shot
the ball between the second defenders legs to score! The frst half of the game, the Ladies came out and played
very good and well organized.
The second half of the game the girls came out the same way but they just could not fnd the back of the
net. They had a ton of shots that just would not go in. Then at the end of the game Canyon managed to get
some shots in our goal, this happed after one of our defenders come out with a injury, and some lucky bounces
that they got. Tate stepped up and was able to stop every shot that came her way. Our starting goalie only had
about 3 shots on her the 50 minutes that she played. The fnal score of this game ended up being Borger 1 and
Canyon 0.
The Lady Bulldogs will face Lubbock Monterey in the playoffs. They are still working on the date, time,
and location. This week the team will focus on fxing the few break downs they had and focus on the upcom-
ing game. The girls are ready and very excited of extending their season. Their coach Jose Morales is thrilled
to be their coach and very proud of his team of soccer girls. They are a 3A school competing with the 4A
schools. The girls understand that it is going to be tough but they also know that no one else works has hard
as we do to be the best soccer team that we can be.
This win over Canyon has helped the team secure the third place in district behind number 1- Amarillo
high, and number 2 Randall. Borger 1 - Canyon 0
Sending out a huge Congratulations to our Borger Lady Bulldog varsity soccer team!
Borger girls soccer team are moving on up
Sanford-Fritch baseball team took on Boys Ranch on Sat-
urday. This must have been a tough game as the Eagles fall
to Boys Ranch with a fnal score of the Eagles at 3 and Boys
Ranch at 14. Leaving the Eagles Varsity at 4-7. Sanford-
Fritch plays Boys Ranch again today at 4pm.
From the looks of the following results, the Borger track and feld team had a good day in
Dalhart. Caleb Dickson alone won 5 gold medals! Caleb Dickson and Tomarius Embers went
1-2 in the 200 posting top 10 area times 4x200 relay ran one of the fastest times in the state
to date, (rankings will be compiled by Monday and posted but Coach Hall has no doubt they
are top 5 atleast).
Results Dalhart Classic Invitational Track Meet 3/21/14
Girls Team Totals- 3rd Place 61 points
Long jump- 6th Morgan Gray
Triple jump- 3rd Bryn Francis
Shot Put- 2nd Dana Dickson
Discus- 5th Makayla Brisco
High jump- 6th Raven Rubalcalba
3200- 5th Hallie Harris
4x100- 3rd Claire Karr, Markesha Haines, Chloe Dickson, Blanca Urquidi
800- 5th Jasmine Rodriguez
4x200- 4th Chloe Dickson, Daniella Ramirez, Meryl Williams, Selene Urquidi
400- 6th Emily Espe
200- 3rd Blanca Urquidi
4x400- 3rd Jasmine Rodruguez, Emily Espe, Blanca Urquidi, Selene Urquidi
Junior Varsity Boys Team Totals- 2nd 137
High Jump- 4th Malcom Hernandez, 6th Eya Lewis
Long Jump- 1st Malcom Hernandez
Triple Jump- 3rd Eya Lewis
Discus-4th Bryce Day
3200- 4th Joe Rodriguez
4x100-2nd Nick Gunn, Alex Shoptease, Tyree Judd, Dontae Chambers
800- 2nd Dontae Chambers
110 Hurdles- 4th Malcom Hernandez, 5th Eya Lewis
100- 1st Alex Shoptease, 3rd Nick Gunn
4x200- 2nd Tyree Judd, Corbin McGill, Maverick Wilkinson, Alex Shoptease
400-3rd Braden Watson, 5th Brandon Olivas
300 Hurdles- 1st Eya Lewis, 3rd Malcom Hernandez
1600- 5th Joe Rodriguez
4x400- 1st Malcom Hernandez, Braden Watson, Dantae Chambers, Eya Lewis
Varsity Boys Team Totals- 2nd 135 points
Triple Jump- 1st Caleb Dickson
Long Jump- 1st Caleb Dickson
Discus- 2nd Colton Jones
Shot Put- 3rd Colton Jones
Pole Vault- 1st Colton Derouren
4x100-2nd Tyler Baker, Vincent Herron, Colton Beaty, Tomarius Embers
100- 2nd Dion Blakemoore, 3rd Tyler Baker, 5th Ishmil Stefanski
4x200- 1st Vincent Herron, Dion Blakemoore, Tomarius Embers, Caleb Dickson
200- 1st Caleb Dickson, 2nd Tomarius Embers
4x400- 1st Vincent Herron, Dion Blakemoore, Colton Beaty, Caleb Dickson
Sanford-Fritch falls to Boys Ranch
Borger kicking up dust in Dalhart
MONDAY,
MARCH 24, 2014
Borger News- Herald
Community
7
The community wide
health fair will be held
on Thursday, April 10th
and will be a free event
for area residents. This
year’s health fair will fea-
ture several new demon-
strations as well as free
screenings and informa-
tion booths. All are de-
signed to help attendees
have a better understand-
ing about health care and
health and safety prac-
tices.
New demonstrations
will feature a child safety
seat check. The person at-
tending should have their
safety seat in their vehicle
and the installation of the
seat will be checked for
installation accuracy. In
order to take part in this
demonstration, appoint-
ments will be necessary
and may be made by call-
ing the Texas Agri Life
Office at 806-878-4026.
There will also be a limit-
ed number of seats which
will be made available for
free. Participants again,
must call for an appoint-
ment and must have their
vehicle present for instal-
lations of the seat and also
the child who will be oc-
cupying the seat.
Xcel Energy will be
present with the Electrical
Arching Demonstration
which is intended to teach
awareness of electrical
safety. This demonstra-
tion will run at various
times throughout the day.
Teen Texting and Driv-
ing will be a simulated ac-
tivity which will focus on
the dangers of texting and
driving. This is not lim-
ited to teens but to all to
gain an understanding of
the critical dangers of tex-
ting while in the driver’s
seat.
Drunk Driving will be
featured in a simulated
activity to help those par-
ticipating experience the
effects of a drunk driver.
Many booths featur-
ing screenings and health
information will be pro-
vided throughout the day.
The health fair will open
at 8:30 a.m. for fasting
blood draws and will end
at 2:30 p.m. Mark your
calendar and make plans
to attend this informative
day designed to improve
your health and health
and safety knowledge.
Health fair to feature
new demonstrations
Kristly Slough, County Extension Agent, demonstrates
the correct way to install a child safety seat. This service will be available at
the Health Fair, April 10th, by appointment only. Call 806-878-4026 to book a time.
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
– The New York Times
called the New York The-
atre Ballet “an invaluable
company” for their com-
pelling work onstage and
their commitment as evan-
gelists for Dance. The
storied dance company
will perform a program of
scenes from classic works,
including Cinderella
(Prokofiev) and Sleeping
Beauty (Tchaikovsky),
at the M.K. Brown Civic
Auditorium in Pampa on
Thursday, April 3, 2014 at
7:30 p.m. Season tickets
for the four concert series
are $40/adult. Single tick-
ets for this performance
are $20. Season sub-
scriptions include recip-
rocal tickets for concerts
in Borger and Plainview,
Texas and Liberal, Kan-
sas. For more information
call 806-665-9432.
Live On Stage, Inc.
and Pampa Community
Concert Association will
also sponsor a student
outreach performance by
New York Theatre Ballet
as part of their ongoing
commitment to support
arts education in the com-
munity.
Founded in 1978 by
Diana Byer, the New York
Theatre Ballet is one of the
most widely seen compa-
nies in the United States.
New York Theatre Ballet
(“NYTB”) is dedicated to
inspiring a love of dance
and enriching diverse au-
diences through its perfor-
mances of contemporary
and classic chamber bal-
let masterpieces for adults
and innovative one-hour
ballets for children. The
troupe commonly per-
forms in smaller towns
and venues as part of their
focus on new audiences
and under-served children;
they are often the first
dance performance expe-
rience for many guests.
The Pampa Community
Concert Association has
been presenting interna-
tionally acclaimed artists
to the community since
1944. This all-volunteer
nonprofit organization is
committed to enriching
the cultural life in the Tex-
as Panhandle through live
performances. Thanks to
the generosity of Patrons
and Corporate Members,
these concerts can be of-
fered at affordable, family
friendly prices.
The New York Theatre Ballet to
Perform in Pampa, Texas on April 3
Dear EarthTalk: What
is the environmental im-
pact of those “K-Cups”
everyone seems to be using
nowadays to make coffee at
both home and offce?
-- Chris
B., Stamford, CT
K-Cups—those little
one-serving coffee con-
tainers that allow people to
brew one cup at a time in a
specially designed Keurig
brewing machine—are all
the rage these days. Each
K-Cup is made up of a
plastic outer container with
one cup’s worth of ground
coffee and a small flter in-
side, capped off with a foil
lid. They go into Keurig
brewing machines which
pierce the bottom of the K-
Cup with a nozzle that then
forces hot water through
the coffee grounds and fl-
ter, and then out into the
drinker’s cup. K-Cups and
the Keurig brewers are con-
venient and require little to
no clean-up while produc-
ing gourmet quality coffee
for a fraction of the price
that a retail coffee shop
would charge.
Environmentalists’ beef
with the Keurig system is
in the single-use, non-recy-
clable nature of the packag-
ing, given the implications
for our waste stream. The
individual parts of a K-Cup
(plastic, paper and foil)
could theoretically be re-
cycled on their own, but the
combination is too small
and messy for recycling fa-
cilities to be able to sort. So
our only choice is to throw
the whole K-Cup pack,
lock stock and barrel, into
the garbage. Each pound of
coffee consumed sends 50
K-Cups to the landfll. And
with upwards of 17 million
U.S. households and offces
possessing Keurig brewers
these days, billions of K-
Cups are already ending up
in landflls every year.
Keurig Green Moun-
tain, the company behind
the K-Cup revolution, is on
the case about the bad en-
vironmental reputation it is
developing over the issue.
As a frst step, it launched
its Grounds to Grow On
program in 2011 whereby
offce customers can pur-
chase K-Cup recovery bins
and fll them up with spent
K-Cups. When the boxes
are full, they are shipped to
Keurig’s disposal partner,
which turns the used cof-
fee grounds into compost
and sends the rest out to be
incinerated in a “waste-to-
energy” power plant. Crit-
ics point out, though, that
waste-to-energy is hardly
green given the airborne
pollutants released from in-
cinerator smokestacks and
the fact that, in the words of
Julie Craves of the Coffee
& Conservation blog, re-
cycling is the enemy of the
never-ending stream of gar-
bage needed to feed waste-
to-energy facilities.
In 2012, Keurig Green
Mountain, realizing it still
had a lot of work to do
on sustainability matters,
undertook a lifecycle as-
sessment across its prod-
uct lines—and set ambi-
tious sustainability targets
to achieve by 2020. Chief
among them is to make all
K-Cups 100 percent recy-
clable. Other goals include
ensuring responsible sourc-
ing for all its primary agri-
cultural and manufactured
products, reducing life-
cycle greenhouse gas emis-
sions of its brewed beverag-
es by 25 percent compared
to the 2012 baseline, and
achieving zero waste-to-
landflls its manufacturing
and distribution facilities.
Those who love the
Keurig system but are ready
to forego the environmental
guilt sooner than 2020 do
have some options. Julie
Craves reports that used
K-Cups can actually be re-
flled with ground coffee
and reused. An easier op-
tion might be buying a reus-
able K-Cup—most of them
are made out of plastic with
a stainless steel mesh fl-
ter. Still the best choice for
the environment, however,
might be getting the old
traditional coffee pot out
of storage and brewing up
several cups at once—just
like the old days.
CONTACTS: Keurig
Green Mountain, www.
keuriggreenmountain.com;
Coffee & Conservation
Blog, www.coffeehabitat.
com.
EarthTalk® is writ-
ten and edited by Roddy
Scheer and Doug Moss and
is a registered trademark
of E - The Environmental
Magazine (www.emaga-
zine.com). Send questions
to: earthtalk@emagazine.
com.
EarthTalk: Keurig
“K-Cup” Coffee Containers
Amarillo Mobile Vet
Center will be at the Hutchi-
son county free health fair
located at Frank Phillips
College BCAC 1301 W.
Roosevelt Borger TX on
April 10, 2014 between the
hours of 9:00 AM and 3:00
PM to provide education
about readjustment coun-
seling services offered at
Vet Centers. All War Zone
Vets qualify for counseling
services. Active duty per-
sonnel and War Zone Vets
with Post Traumatic Stress
Disorder or Military Sexual
Trauma may receive care at
any Vet Center or MVC. We
provide 3 sessions to Non-
War Zone Vets for informa-
tion and referrals. Certain
families of active duty ser-
vice men and women who
have died while on active
duty may qualify for be-
reavement services. Other
services offered include:
Individual, group, and
family readjustment coun-
seling to assist active duty
service members in making
a successful transition from
combat, to garrison, or ci-
vilian life.
Post-traumatic stress
disorder (PTSD) treatment
and help with other related
problems that affect func-
tioning within the family,
work, school or other areas
of everyday life.
Military sexual trauma
counseling for active duty
service members of both
genders.
Service members and
Veterans will be required to
provide documentation by
their third visit indicating
they have served in a com-
bat or war zone to continue
counseling. A copy of one
of the following documents
will meet this requirement:
DD214, deployment demo-
bilization order, enlisted
record brief, offcer record
brief, or an award citation
indicating service member
served in a combat zone.
These services are also
available to family mem-
bers of active duty combat
service members as well as
family members of combat
Veterans.
For more information
please contact the Amaril-
lo Vet Center, 3414 Olsen
Blvd, Amarillo TX 79109.
Phone: 806-354-9779
In addition to its regular
operating hours Monday-
Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., the Amarillo Vet Cen-
ter has extended hours three
nights a week (Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday)
until 8 p.m.
Amarillo Mobile Vet Center visits
Hutchinson County Free Health Fair in
support of VA2VETS Outreach Initiative
BORGER NEWS-HERALDservice directory
To place your ad in the Service Directory call Kristie or Mikaela at 273-5611
Top-O-Texas Plumbing
FAX: 806-350-7981
Call:1-800-693-3406
New Water, Sewer & Gas Lines
Leaks Repaired
No Mileage or Travel Charge
55 Years of Experience
“Call A Professional”
Texas Master Plumber License: M-20046 WSPS
Best Prices
-T
h
e
W
a
t
e
r
H
e
a
t
e
r
B
a
r
g
a
i
n
H
o
u
s
e
HOT! HOT! HOT!
Complete TreeService
•Removing & Topping
•Bucket Truck • Stump
•Grinder • Free Estimates
•Senior Discounts
806-857-3131
C
a
r
t
e
r

s
T
r
e
e
S
e
r
v
i
c
e
Plumbing,
Heating & Air
Conditioning
Kenny Landers, Owner
806-898-4607
NOW Taking Credit Cards!
LIC.# TACLA29426E
LIC.# M40138
Texas State Board of Plumbing
Examiners 800-845-6584
P.O. 1171 • Borger, Tx 79008
H
K

s
MACS TOWING
OWNER & OPERATOR
MARK HOPE
PHONE: 806-878-8444
CELL: 806-274-0767
Serving Stinnett and the
Surrounding Areas
SERVING THE BORGER
AREA FOR OVER 30 YEARS
CALL:806-878-2812
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Greg’s
1415 W. Wilson • Borger • 806.273.1406
Complimentary Breakfast & Dinner
Free Wireless Internet
Satisfaction Guaranteed
HOTEL
Texas Inkslingers
Tat too Studio
Est. 1993
Nationally Publ ished
mal e &femal e Artists
State &City Licensed
(806) 935- 7433
316 N. Dumas Ave.
Dumas TX
Find us on Facebook!
CONSTRUCTION/CARPET
PENACO BUILDERS &
RED CARPET CENTER
REMODELING, CUSTOM BUILDING, CONCRETE,
ROOFING, DECKS, MASONRY, CARPET-VINYL
LAMINATE-WOOD-TILE-CERAMIC FLOORING
One Stop Services
920 N. Cedar - Borger - (806) 273-2728 - JR Pena, Owner
penacobuilders.com redcarpetcenter.com
M&R
Tree
Full Scale Tree Service
& Weed Control Co.
Insured/Senior Discounts
Tree Feeding • Lawn Winterization
15% Off Month Of OCTOBER
Call (806) 273-2370
E-CIGS
WT Vapors
Great Selection of
eGo-C - Twist
Batteries - Tanks
Atomizers - Vapors
Accessories - Much More!!
722 Weatherly - Borger
www.wtvapors.com
806-274-8874
Like Us On FACEBOOK!!
OPENS @ 7:30am
• Family owned & operated
• Maintaining superior service
• 4 groomers on staff = no wait
Boarding Available:
1-25 lbs. $12/day
26-50 lbs. $14/day
over 50 lbs. $17/day
421 E. 10th St.
(806) 273-2724
Like us on Facebook!
HOOCHY POOCHY
GROOMING PARLOR
& BOARDING
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES
NEW HOMES IN BORGER
Penn Avenue Properties
Now Selling New Residential
Homes • Duplexes & Four Plexes
25 City Lots To Choose From!
Call Today - 806-341-7170
stanleyafranks@gmail.com
Mon-Fri 9 am to 7 pm
Sat 11 am to 4 pm
806-275-9952
M
u
c
h
M
o
r
e
!
!
A
n
d
M
u
c
h
.
.
.
.
.
APPAREL & TANNING
TATTOOS
BRAKES &
ALIGNMENT
BY APPOINTMENT
HARVEY
TIRE CO.
806-273-5861
305 Carolina•Borger
AUTO PARTS
330 Weatherly St.
Borger, Texas
AUTO PARTS AUTOMOTIVE
BOB’S BAIL BONDS
806-274-9333
SE HABLA ESPANOL
We get your feet back on the street
with professional & friendly service!
LO SACAMOS DE LA CARCEL RAPIDO, CON SERVICIO PROFESIONAL Y AMABLE.
4106 Georgia St. • Amarillo
David Shannon
806-322-3688 • 806-679-3221
Cars • Harleys • Trucks
BAIL BONDS CARS • HARLEYS • TRUCKS
C/H&A PLUMBING
Rusty Sims, Owner - TACLB27830E
Office: 806-878-2229
Cell: 806-231-7393
We accept VISA & MC
WEST TEXAS
FREE ESTIMATES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
+Service All Brands
+New Equipment Installation
+Blow-In Attic Insulation
+Over 20 Years Experience
C/H&A
PLUMBING
APPLIANCE REPAIR
TOWING TREE SERVICE
TLC Caregivers
Open Hands • Warm Hearts
806-274-9112
Experienced Professional Care Providers
106 W. 6th • Borger, Tx 79007
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS AND APPLICATIONS
CAREGIVERS
R
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f
n
g
, C
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e
t
e
,
R
e
m
o
d
e
lin
g
, T
ile
w
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r
k
,
F
lo
o
r
in
g
a
n
d
m
o
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e
..
C
a
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y
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e
s
t
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!
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) 2
4
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7
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V
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C
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JH CONCRETE
We specalize in all types of concrete!
•Stamp & Stain Concrete
• Stamp Concrete
• Concrete Slab
• Concrete Building
• Side Walks & Driveways
& Much More!
Licensed & Insured
Call For Free Estimate
806-382-5408
PENACO
BUILDERS
Specializing in concrete
We do:
Stamping
Staining
Retaining Walls
Sidewalks
Driveways
Masonry
Stucco
References available.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Call JR Pena @
806-898-4799
CONCRETE CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
TREE SERVICE
DOG GROOMING/BOARDING
APARTMENTS
Adobe Ranch Apartments
1/2 Off Security
Deposit
For the Month
of March
400 E. 10th St. • Borger
On 2 & 3
Bedrooms
Apartments!
806-273-2766
The Good Book Says...
Ask and you shall receive, and
He has never let me down! I
am asking God to help me find
an honest financial partner to
recondition homes in the Borger
area. Money is secured by local
real estate. If you or someone you
know would be interested, please
contact: Charles Hogan
(806)395-6245
or email
charleshogan1@sbcglobal.net
HELP WANTED
Advertise Your
Business
On This
Page Call
806-273-5611
Look No Further than here for
all your service needs!
Check Out our website
www.borgernewsherald.com
DISH NETWORK
JUMP INTO
WHOLE-HOME
ENTERTAINMENT
AUTHORIZED RETAILER
$
19
99
PROMOTIONAL
PRICES START AT
mo
FOR 12 MONTHS
WITH 24-MONTH
COMMITMENT
OFFER ENDS 6/12/14 RESTRICTIONS APPLY. CALL FOR DETAILS
DBS Satellite Your local retailer.
Call Ken Watson (806) 865 - 3877
ALL OFFERS REQUIRE CREDIT QUALIFICATION.
--
BORGER NEWS-HERALDclassifieds page
To place your ad here call Jaimee at 273-5611
TELEPHONE AND CAT. 5
wi ri ng and repai r, work-
done, 40+ years experi -
ence, telephone installation
and repai r cal l (806)274-
3100
TELEPHONE/TV
490 AUTO SALES
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising
i n thi s newspaper i s sub-
j ect to the federal fai r
housi ng act of 1968
whi ch makes i t i l l egal to
adverti se “any prefer-
ence, l i mi tati on or di s-
cri mi nati on based on
race, col or, rel i gi on,
handi cap, fami l y status,
sex or nati onal ori gi n, or
an i ntenti on to make any
such preference, l i mi ta-
tion or discrimination.”
Thi s newspaper wi l l not
knowingly accept any ad-
verti si ng for real estate
which is in violation of the
l aw. Our readers are
hereby i nformed that al l
dwel l i ngs adverti sed i n
thi s newspaper are avai l -
able on an equal opportu-
nity basis.
3 BEDROOM house
(806)595-0285 FOR
SALE!!
410 CITY PROPERTY
THE BORGER NEWS-
HERALD SUGGESTS
that its readers take cau-
tion when calling an
area code beginning
with 809 or a prefix of
011. These are interna-
tional toll numbers and
you will be charged inter-
national long distance
rates. For more informa-
tion and assistance re-
garding the investigation
of work at home opportu-
nities and job lists contact
the Better Business Bu-
reau of South Texas, 609
S International Blvd., We-
slaco, TX 78596. (210)
968-3678.
390 BUS. OPPORTUNITY
2 BR, CONTRACTOR
RATES. Furni shed. Bi l l s
Pai d. (806)857-1296, or
(806)857-2436
320 HOUSES FOR RENT
2010 GLASTRON GT-180
EVINRUDE 115 E-TEC
Li ke New, Warranty,
$16,500 (806-395-3593)
230 MISC. FOR SALE
COUCH, LOVESEAT,
AND RECLINER for sal e.
(806)857-3257
160 FURNISHINGS
WE DO ODD JOBS, paint-
i ng, anythi ng you want
done we can do i t. 806-
382-3330
110 WORK WANTED
NEXGEN-PAVING
NOW-HIRING
Labor &Operator
Must Have Valid DL
Call 806-935-4866
DO YOU need a steady
j ob? Looki ng for: machi -
ni sts, heavy equi pment
mechani cs and fi el d wel d-
ers. We offer hol i day pay,
heal th i nsurance and va-
cati on. Appl y at PAYTON
MACHINE & SUPPLY at
3100 S. Cedar Street, 8-
12/1-5 M-F.
090 HELP WANTED
010 SPECIAL
$ 9 9 S T A R T S
Y O U R P H A R -
M A C Y benefits
business!
Turnkey system
generates on-
going
residual in-
come! Train-
ing, Support,
& free family
Dental/Vision/
Hearing
program.
877-308-7959
X224 www.ben-
efitallian-
ceinc.com
010 SPECIAL--
001 Legals
005 Public Notice
009 RV Parks
010 Special
015 Auctions
020 Garage Sale
040 Personals
050 Lost & Found
070 Business Solutions
090 Help Wanted
110 Work Wanted
120 Child Care
130 Educational
140 Antiques
150 Home Furnishings
190 Livestock & Supplies
200 Pets & Supplies
230 Miscellaneous For
Sale
250 Boats & Supplies
280 Motorcycles &
Bicycles
290 Miscellaneous
Wanted
300 Want to Rent
310 Rooms For Rent
320 Houses For Rent
321 Houses For Lease
330 Mobile Home
Rentals
340 Apartment Rentals
380 Miscellaneous
Rentals
390 Business Opportunities
410 City Property For
Sale
420 Other Cities Property
470 Pickups, Trucks,
Trailers
480 Recreational
Vehicles
490 Automotive Sales
500 Mobile Home Sales
525 Appliance Repair
750 Firewood
800 Lawn Care
875 Telephone/TV
890 Tree Service
895 Used Cars/Trucks
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF HEARING
BEFORE THE BUILDING STANDARDS COMMISSION
ATTENTION: Owners / Heirs / Lien holders
On Thursday, April 3, 2014, at 3:00 p.m., in the City Council
Room of City Hall, 600 N. Main, the Building Standards
Commission will conduct a Public Hearing concerning
substandard buildings on the following property:
Conduct a Public Hearing for Review on the following property:
A. 306 E Adams, Lot 6, Block 2, Isom Addition
B. 511 W Jackson, Lot 7, Block 35, Isom Addition
C 3111 Fairlanes Blvd, Lot Building 1-16, Bunavista
Units 4 & 5 Addition
D. 1100 N Hedgecoke, Lot 1, Block 5, Phillips
Addition
E. 1023 Coble, Lot 10 & 26’of 11, Block 11, Phillips
Addition
F. 801 S. McGee, Lot W/10’ of 11 & 12, Block 24,
Isom Addition
G. 125 W Grand, Lot W/2 of 13 & 14, Block 13, Isom
Addition
Conduct a Public Hearing on the following property:
A. 312 Veta, Lot 7, Block B, North Hills Addition
B. 622 Madison, Lot 6, Block 38, Isom Addition
All interested persons are hereby notified.
CITY HALL IS WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE. ENTRY IS
ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE BUILDING. EQUIPMENT
PROVIDED FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED.
Rentals Available
Large 4 BDR Home
Utilities Included
Contractors
Welcome!
Call
806-273-5557
HUGE SHOP
For Sale/Lease
Over 17,000
sq. ft. - Call
806-886-5847
Need a
Part Time
Maintenance
person for a
new 48 unit
apt. complex.
Apply in person
at 400 E. 10th
St., Borger, Tx.
TAX SERVICE
Glenda
Brownlee
628 Whittenburg
274-2142
DOUG BOYD
MOTOR CO.
BUY HERE!
PAY HERE!
Hwy. 70 at 60
Pampa, Tx
806-669-6062
NO CREDIT CHECK!
OVER 150
Vehicles In
Stock!
Pick-ups · Vans
Cars · SUV's
See entire stock of vehicles at
www.dougboydmotors.com
Formerly Texas Panhandle Mental Health Mental Retardation
More Jobs @ www.texaspanhandlecenters.org
Apply at www.texaspanhandlecenters.org/employment or
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$9.07/hr Group Home
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School Bus Driver
The Borger ISD Transportation Department
is accepting applications for full time
and part time school bus driver positions.
Applicants must be 18 years of age, hold
or be able to obtain a class “B” CDL with
the “P” and “S” endorsements, pass a
medical examination, drug screen, and
have an acceptable driving record. Apply
online at www.borgerisd.net or call the
Transportation Department (806) 273-1012.
Panhandle Gun
& Knife Show
cooïaç /o
9o-çc-
June 7th & 8th
For Booth Information Call 806-273-5611
and ask for Stephanie Hooper!
 nh ndle Gun & KniIe Show
S tuvd y  nd Sund y June 7
th
& 8
th
 tthe Dome
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Cont ct ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
Address ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ Crty ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ St te ¸¸¸¸¸ Zrp ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
Busrness Phone ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ l x ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
Booth InIovm tion
Booth sp ce: Booth Sp ce rs prrced per 8' t bles. T bles must be ovdeved below iI you need them.
Ch i vs will not be pvovided. All booths must be ve dy by 10:00  . m. S tuvd y movning. You m y
set up Fvid y Itevnoon. Persons workrng your booth wrll be requrred to h ve n entry br celet.
Br celets c n be prcked up  t the ome durrng setup.
Booth  nd t ble Needs ···· Vevy Impovt nt ···· le se Fill Out This Section
_______ Booth sp ce pev d y----------------------------------------------------$50.00
_______ Booth sp ce plus t ble pev d y ---------------------------------------$60.00
T bles (How m ny 8' T bles Will You Need?) Qu ntity _____ ($10.00 e ch)
ELECTRICITY IS LIMITEDAND ONLYAVAILABLE IN DESIGNATED AREAS
····IFYOU DO NEED ELECTRICITY, LEASE LET ME KNOW ________····
·······DO NOT LEAVE THIS AREA BLANK·······
E ch exhrbrtor wrll be responsrble for the rnst ll tron nd m rnten nce of therr own drspl y. All guns wrll need to
be unlo ded nd str p run through the b rrel. All mmunrtron must be rn boxes. Inst ll tion will begin t 12
p.m. on Fvid y, June 6th  nd must be completed by 10:00 .m. S tuvd y movning June 7
th
. Secuvity will
be pvovided st vting Fvid y thvough Sund y. rsm ntlrng wrll be completed by 5 p.m. Sund y June 8
st
. The
fternoon of the show BNH wrll not be responsrble for rtems left rn the burldrng fter the event.
Applrc nt's Srgn ture: ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸   te: ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
Complete  vticip ti on Fovm No L tev th nM y 15, 2014 to: Bovgev News-Hev ld,
Attn: Steph nie Hoopev
.O. Box 5130, Bovgev, TX 79007  hone: 806-273-5611 F x: 806-273-2552
Em i l: hoopev¿bovgevnewshev l d.com
10
MONDAY,
MARCH 24, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Pictures
Volunteers help roll meat balls to prepare for the dinner.
Volunteers prepare meat for meat balls.
Curt Brancheau and Ben Mosley add spices to the mix.
Around Town with Don Rice
preparing for 59th Annual St. John’s Spaghetti Dinner
Walk Keller and Ralph Batenhursten.
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PCM Borger news-Herld 3x10.indd 1 11/11/13 12:53 PM
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