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Monday, February 17, 2014

February 17, 2014

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AMARILLO — The
Amarillo District of the
Texas Department of
Transportation (TxDOT)
is preparing for heavier-
than-normal traffc lev-
els at the Canadian River
Bridge on US 87/287 for
the annual “Sand Drags”
off-road event Febru-
ary 22 and February 23,
2014.
The annual event at-
tracts thousands to the
Canadian River bottoms,
but this year’s event will
be held in the area of a
major bridge reconstruc-
tion project. The south-
bound Canadian River
Bridge on US 87/287
has been removed, and a
new bridge is being built.
Traffc has been reduced
to one lane in each direc-
tion over the northbound
span of the bridge. The
project will cause con-
gestion and delays during
next weekend’s event.
TxDOT will have vari-
able message boards in
place north and south of
the bridge reminding mo-
torists to travel with cau-
tion and to be aware of
traffc exiting and enter-
ing US 87/287 from the
event. Those attending
the event from Amarillo
will be able to turn right
at the entrance, located
just to the south of the
existing bridge. How-
ever, when leaving the
event, all traffc will be
required to turn right and
head north over the exist-
ing bridge. A turn-around
will be located about a
mile north of the bridge
for those attendees wish-
ing to travel south back to
Amarillo.
Those attendees com-
ing from the north will
be required to cross the
existing bridge and use
the turn-around located
about a mile south of the
bridge, then head north to
the event entrance. When
leaving, those attendees
wishing to travel north
will turn right and contin-
ue to their destination.
Attendees will be lim-
ited as to where they can
travel around the bridge
site, and the construction
zone will be fenced off.
However, a narrow cor-
ridor will be provided for
off-road vehicle to pass
through.
Law enforcement will
be patrolling the area in
an effort to help control
the expected heavy traf-
fc. Those who attend the
event are urged to use ex-
treme caution, and to be
patient driving in and out
of the event gate.
Daily 50 Cents
Weekend 75 Cents
Your Local Weather
Fri
2/14
58/39
A few clouds
from time to
time. High
58F. Winds
NNE at 15 to
25 mph.
Sat
2/15
76/37
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
upper 30s.
Sun
2/16
75/50
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
low 50s.
Mon
2/17
60/40
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
low 40s.
Tue
2/18
71/44
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 70s and
lows in the
mid 40s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
“I can’t imagine anything
worse than being required
to have fun”
Scott Westerfeld
Stay
informed
of local news, weather,
sports, and other fun
and interesting events
around
Hutchinson County at
www.BorgerNewsHerald.com
Index
Obituaries
Comm. Calendar
Opinion
Comics
Service Directory
Classifeds
Sports
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
DPS Announces ‘Sand Drags’
traffic enforcement plans
Dr. Robertson, DDS
101 N McGee St
Borger, TX 79007
(806) 274-2285
Neta
Henderson
Scan here with QR Reading App, or
visit BorgerNewsHerald.com
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news and the latest sports scores!
Don’t
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Week Ahead in Sports
Recipe of the Day!
(Left to right) Becky Perry, Joan Carder, Nancy Bodziak, Lida Whitehead, Marleen McKinney and Kimi Harbin prepare for Opportunities
Inc.’ Stew Dinner and Bake Sale fund raiser which was held over the weekend. - Photo by Don Rice
Opportunities Inc. holds annual
Stew Dinner and Bake Sale Fund Raiser
Moving forward while remembering the past...Serving Hutchinson County since 1926
Borger News-Herald
Vol. 89, No. 41, 14 Pages
Monday, February 17, 2014
MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 17, 2014 Borger News- Herald 2
Obituaries
Local Weather
Temperatures will take a tumble in the wake of this morning’s cold front. Even
though bright skies will prevail all day, highs will only manage to climb to near 60
degrees. Winds will be stronger in the morning, blowing from the north at 15-25
mph before coming around to the southeast later on and decreasing to the 10-20 mph
range.
From StormSearch 7 meteorologist Alyssa Pawlak
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Headlines
from the
1940’s Decade
Book NOW ON
SALE -
$
15.00
Come in and get your copy today!
The Borger News-Herald
207 N. Main
Borger, Tx 79007
The Heroes of
Hutchinson countY
Hutchinson County and
small town society are fa-
mous for their close-knit
communities and a spirit of
generosity and solidarity.
Some people exemplify
this archetype. We know
who they are, because they
are the ones who catch us
when we are falling, or who
inspire us to race faster,
reach farther, and build big-
ger. They are the beams that
support us and the fuel that
keeps us moving. They are
in our churches and they are
in our clubs. They are our
professors, our teachers,
our mentors, our bosses,
our neighbors. They are our
heroes.
Our Heroes affect daily
life in Hutchinson county in
ways big and small, and in
ways some might overlook
while we busy ourselves
with our routines. They af-
fect our jobs, they affect
our kids, they affect their
neighborhoods. They vol-
unteer, they reach out, or
maybe they are just friendly
and dependable.
We, the Borger News-
Herald, want to recognize
them.
As part of a new fea-
ture, The BNH will begin
to highlight those among
us who embody the spirit
of heroism and make them-
selves valuable to our com-
munity. Each week we will
feature a local resident who
makes a tangible impact in
the county. It could be a
high-profle person, like a
well-known university fg-
ure, a successful business
leader, or someone who’s
logged thousands of volun-
teer hours with a local orga-
nization, but it doesn’t have
to be. Our Hero of Hutchin-
son County could be some-
one who fnds a small, may-
be unnoticed, way to make
a large impact.
The way we do this will
be unique. Our newsroom
will choose a resident to
feature each week, focus-
ing on how the person has
shown themselves to be a
true Hero among us, and
has positively infuenced
the county. We will talk to
the person’s friends, fam-
ily, and coworkers, fellow
church members – anyone
who might help us con-
struct a ftting tribute to our
subject. We won’t, how-
ever, interview the person
being featured. Ideally, the
one featured wouldn’t even
know about it until the story
is published.
Our hope is to pleasantly
surprise each of those we
feature with a story that tells
how they make a difference
in this county through the
eyes of those they most
impact. To do this success-
fully, we need your help.
We want to know who you
think we should feature
in our weekly Heroes of
Hutchinson County piece.
Please e-mail the names of
anyone you would like to
nominate, along with a brief
description and the ways
they make a difference in
the community, to Editor@
BorgerNewsHeral d. com
with the subject line: He-
roes of Hutchinson County.
We are your community
paper, and we want this to
be another way to highlight
Hutchinson’s greatest asset
– its people.
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
Rebecca “Becky” Timmens, 72, went to be
with the Lord on February 14, 2014 in Fritch.
Memorial services will be at 11:00 AM Wednesday, Feb. 19,
2014, at the First Baptist Church in Fritch with Rev. Danny
Courtney, pastor, offciating. Cremation and arrangements are
by Carmichael-Whatley Funeral Directors of Pampa.
Mrs. Timmens was born June 28, 1941 in Spanishburg, West
Virginia. Becky was a resident of Amarillo for 20 years be-
fore moving to Fritch 12 years ago. She married Terry Tim-
mens on March 29, 1978 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She was a
homemaker and a devoted grandmother. She was preceded in death by her parents, C. G. and
Effe Bell; a son, Johnny Allen Belcher; three grandchildren, Rebecca Smith, David Belcher
and Johnny Allen Belcher, Jr; and 12 brothers and sisters.
Survivors include her husband, Terry Timmens of the home; four daughters, Billie Ruth Tay-
lor and husband Earl of Keystone, West Virginia, Lydia Hethcox of Fritch, Terri Childress and
husband Tom of Weatherford, and Angela Adornetto of Follett; two sons, Greg “Cowboy”
Belcher and companion Amy Menefeld of Fritch, and Chuck Timmens and wife Pearl of Dub-
lin; a brother, John C. Bell and wife Janice of Hernando, MS; a sister-in-law, Timara Graves of
Arkansas; 21 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.
Memorials may be made to Accolade Hospice, 1224 N. Hobart, Pampa, Texas 79065.
Sign the on-line guest register at www.carmichael-whatley.com
According to 18Th Dis-
trict Commander, William
Dannheim of The American
Legion, Department of Tex-
as, Amarillo’s Hanson Post
54 will be the site of the
Spring convention sched-
uled for Saturday, March
8th, 2014. Dannheim stated
that this particular meeting
would be extremely special
because of the presence of
many State and National
leaders. Attending will
be: Alternate National
Executive Committeeman
and Past State Commander
Butch Sparks of Pearl-
and, State Commander Jim
Fleming of Anna, State SAL
Commander Bill Kuehner
of Benbrook, 4th Division
Commander Ron Pietzsch
of Roscoe, 4th Division
Auxiliary President Caro-
lyn Dutton of Weatherford,
Past State Vice Commander
Lynn Sparks of Pearland
and State Training Commit-
tee Chairman Fred Rogers
of Frisco. Also planning
to attend are several Past
District and Division Com-
manders and Presidents.
The event will begin at
8:00am with a special Can-
non Salute To The Fallen
and remarks from key lead-
ers. Hanson Post 54 Com-
mander Charles Frenzel
has invited the Mayor of
Amarillo to welcome the
delegates. Commander
Dannheim will oversee the
event and lead the offcial
American Legion sessions.
President Dutton will over-
see the Auxiliary session .
The Sons of The American
Legion will meet with the
Legionnaires.
The entire afternoon will
be dedicated to the Ameri-
can Legion Extension In-
stitute which is a four hour
training session instructed
by State Training Chairman
Fred Rogers who is one of
only eight certifed instruc-
tors in the State. Barry
Schoenhals of Darrouzett
who chaired the state train-
ing committee for the past
two years, explained that
this level of training has
never been conducted in the
18th District and to have
the chairman instructing the
session is even more mean-
ingful. Schoenhals went on
to explain that the training
committee was established
three years ago to develop
programs and curriculum
that would advance The
American Legion through
training and awareness.
The offcial business
session will consider the
approval of a newly re-
vised District Constitution
and By-Laws and a reso-
lution to create a District
Oratorical Scholarship and
a method to fund it and
the existing Eagle Scout
Scholarship and support the
General Fund as well. Del-
egates will also elect new
District Offcers, who will
serve two year terms. “It
will be a very busy day”:
Commander Dannheim ex-
plained, “ but I’m extreme-
ly excited about this event
and what it will represent.
Commander Frenzel and
Hanson American Legion
Post 54 have done a mar-
velous job in planning it.”
18th District meetings
occur every six months
and create a forum for Post
delegates to convene, train
and offer reports on Post
activities. The American
Legion is the nation’s larg-
est and most infuential
organization of wartime
veterans and was chartered
by congress in 1919 with a
purpose to support Children
and Youth, Veteran Affairs
and Rehabilitation, Ameri-
canism and a Strong Na-
tional Defense. The 18th
District is one of fve in the
4th Division, 23 in the State
of Texas and comprises the
top 28 counties of the Texas
Panhandle and Northern
Rolling Plains with Posts in
Amarillo, Borger, Stratford,
Memphis, Booker, Perry-
ton, Darrouzett, Claude,
Parmer County, Dimmitt,
Tulia, Higgins, Nazareth,
Childress, Vega, Shamrock,
Hedley, Hereford, Wheeler,
Matador, Canadian, Miami
and Dumas.
American Legion
to Convene in Amarillo
The Hutchinson County
United Way of Day of Car-
ing will held on April 26,
2014.
Day of Caring is a day
when volunteers choose to
give their time and services
to work on a one-time ser-
vice project in an effort to
impact our community’s
needs with tasks that they
are unable to perform
themselves. Projects are
dependent upon the man-
power available.
If you or someone you
know is elderly or disabled
and in need of help with
minor home improvement
projects, such as:
Home Repairs
Gutters Cleaned
Winterizing Home For
Elderly or Disabled
Small Painting Project
Yard Clean Up
House Keeping
Carpentry & Odd Jobs
All jobs will be limited
to four hours of work.
Jobs are limited, the fol-
lowing types of work will
not be approved:
Work requiring permits
Bathroom remodeling
Large Paint Jobs
Roofng
Gas lines
Electrical
Plumbing
Tree Trimming
Minor Fence Repair
Only
Work on rental prop-
erty
If you would like to
submit a project, please
call (806) 274-9424.
before the March 17,
2014 deadline. Call early,
only 30 job requests are
being taken.
United Way accepting
submissions for Day of Caring
Emma Christine Kuykendall
Gladewater -- Services for Emma Christine Kuyk-
endall, 80, will be held on Thursday, February 20, 2014, at 11
A.M. at Croley Funeral Home Chapel in Gladewater. Burial
will be in Gladewater Memorial Park.
Born on May 4, 1933, in Gilmer, Texas, to Marvin Ed-
gar and Emma Lee Davis, she died on Saturday, February 15,
2014, in Borger, Texas.
She married Harold Dean Kuykendall in 1953, and he
preceded her in death in 1998.
Christine worked as a nurse in Gilmer and Gladewater
for forty years before her retirement. She was a committed
Christian and taught Sunday School classes for many years.
She moved from Gladewater to Tyler in 1999, then to Amarillo in 2005 to be near fam-
ily, and to Borger in 2009.
She is survived by her brother, Edgar Durand Davis and wife Barbara of Borger;
nephew, Brant Davis and wife Gail of Amarillo; niece, Christy Harms and husband Clint of
Amarillo; a grandnephew, Hayden; grandniece, Lynzi; special caregiver, Monica Ibarra; and
many friends.
She was preceded in death by her husband, her parents, and a brother, Eddie Wayne.
No formal visitation is scheduled.
February 20
The Hutchinson County
Retired School Personnel As-
sociation will meet at Frank
Phillips College. Lunch will
be available in the cafeteria
at 11:30 and the program will
follow at 12:30 in the Gallery
Room. The program will be
presented by Gail Chambers,
Healthcare Chairperson, on
the topic of Jamestown- the
Starving Time. This prom-
ises to be an interesting and
intriguing presentation about
an historical event in our his-
tory. All retired public school
employees are invited and
encouraged to come.
February 28
Laurie McAfee from the Area
Agency on Aging in Amarillo
will be presenting an educa-
tional seminar on Medicare
Fraud and Abuse. 10 a.m.,
GPCH Board Room
March 1-2
Altrusa Club will hold its
Craft Show at the Aluminum
Dome Saturday and Sunday.
The show will be open from
9:00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. on
Saturday and from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday.
Admission is free. Vendors
from over the area will fll
the Dome. The concession
stand will be open the entire
time with delicious snacks
available. Proceeds go to
support charitable causes in
the Hutchinson County.
Weekly Meetings
Mondays
Prayer for the Nation, First
Baptist Church chapel, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, Borger. Call 273-
5621 or 857-3947 for more
information.
Borger Football Booster
Club, 7 p.m., Field House.
Borger Tri-City Al Anon
group, First Christian Church,
200 S. Bryan, 6 p.m. Call
806-382-2449 or 806-273-
6017 for more information.
First Mondays
Democratic Party, 7 p.m.
Opportunities Center, 930
Illinois. Call 274-2194 for
more information.
1st and 3rd Mondays
MOPS, mothers of pre-
schoolers international,
meets at First Baptist Church
Borger Fellowship Hall 9:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. child care
is provided. Call FBC 263-
5621 for information.
2nd Monday
Reunion of Retired Medical
Field Employees in Hutchin-
son County
11:30 A.M.
Frank Phillips College Caf-
eteria in the Gallery Room
For more information call
Aileen Jackson at 274-9890or
Betty Jordon at 857-5709
Mondays & Thursdays
Into Action Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyteri-
an Church, 418 W. Coolidge,
8 p.m.
Call 898-4607 for more infor-
mation.
Second Mondays
Senior Adult Game Night,
First Baptist Church, 100 S.
Hedgecoke, 6 p.m.
Hutchinson County Ge-
nealogical Society, American
Red Cross, 614 Weatherly,
7:30 p.m.
Hutchinson County Child
Welfare Board, noon, second
foor of Borger Bank.
Borger Band Booster Club,
BHS auditorium foyer, 6 p.m.
Tuesdays
Calling all poets....if you
write poetry and want to
connect with other poets to
connect with other poets, read
and get positive feedback we
would like to form a lunch
group and/or an evening
group. If interested please
call Mary Zan at 857-3670
for more information
Caprock Nursing &
Rehabilitation - Join us for
donuts and conversation
every Tuesday in the lobby
8:30am, 900 College Ave.
AANA support group for life
challenges, 6:30 p.m., That
One Place Community Cen-
ter, 212 E. Broadway, Fritch.
Call 275-0183.
Rotary Club, noon, Tem-
porarily held in Plainsmen
Room at FPC Cafeteria Call
274-3321 for more informa-
tion.
Borger Creative Arts Club,
Opportunities Center, 9 a.m.
Call 886-0299 for more infor-
mation.
First & Third
Tuesdays
Stinnett Golden Spread
Grandmothers’ Club, Stinnett
Senior Citizen Building, 6:30
p.m. Call 878-2960 or 878-
3272 for more information.
Second & Fourth
Tuesdays
Community Prayer Ministry,
7 p.m. Call 857-3975 for
location.
Alibates Creek Indian Danc-
ers, 7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran
Church, 212 W. Jefferson.
Call 274-3239 for more infor-
mation.
VFW Post #1789 meets at the
VFW Hall at 7:30 p.m.
Second Tuesdays
Journey, an Alzheimer’s
support group, Golden Plains
Community Hospital Board
Room, 1 p.m. Call 467-5732
for more information.
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings, Op-
portunities Center, 11 a.m. to
noon.
4-H Club River Breaks
Shooting Sports, Borger
Chamber of Commerce, 6:30
p.m. Call 806-878-4026.
Vietnam Veterans of America
Chapter 404, 403 S Cornell in
Fritch, 5:30 p.m. dinner and
6:00 meetings. Call 857-3950
for more information.
Accolade Home Care,
no-cost health screenings,
10 a.m. to noon, County
Courthouse. Call 665-9700
for more information.
Third Tuesdays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure screen-
ings, MAL’S Café, Stinnett, 8
a.m. to 9 a.m.
Phillips Alumni Association,
Frank Phillips College Gal-
lery Room, 7 p.m.
American Legion Post 0671
meets at 7:30 pm at the
American Legion post next to
the Aluminum Dome
Wednesdays
Borger Area Ministerial
Fellowship, 8 a.m., Golden
Plains Community Hospital
Board Room.
Sanford Alcoholics Anony-
mous, 301 E. Davis, 8 p.m.
Call 857-2267 for more infor-
mation.
Borger Noon Lions Club,
noon, FPC Cafeteria.
Dance, Drama and Art 10:30-
12 St. Andrews United Meth-
odist Church ends 8-7-13
Thursdays
Bingo! at the Borger Elks
Lodge. Everyone’s welcome,
Doors open 5 pm, Cards sold
starting at 6 p.m.
First number at 6:30 pm, $14
each packet of 13 games or 6
papers for each of 13 games,
Additional papers half pack-
ets for $7.
First Thursdays
Hutchinson County Repub-
lican Women, noon, FPC
Gallery Room
Call 273-8363 for more infor-
mation.
First & Third
Thursdays
Unity Masonic Lodge, 7:30
p.m.
First Thursdays
Parents Who Have Lost Chil-
dren Grief Support Group,
New U on Main Street, 7
p.m.
Call 275-1430 for more infor-
mation.
Second Thursdays
Northwest Amateur Radio
Club, American Red Cross,
614 Weatherly, 7 p.m.
Second Thursdays
Fridays
Kiwanis Club, noon, Frank
Phillips College Gallery
Room.
Fritch Senior Citizen Sun-
shine Club, 12 noon for lunch
followed by games.
Celebrate Recovery, 7 p.m.,
305 N. Deahl. Call 273-7127
or see fellowshipborger.com.
Second Fridays
Golden Plains Home Health
Care, blood pressure and
blood sugar screenings,
Fritch Sunshine Club, 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Parkinson’ Disease Support
Group, Perryton Mennonite
Church, 2821 S. Ash,
Fritch Senior Citizens Club
potluck dinner, business
meeting, games at noon.
Interim Home Health Care,
free blood pressure and blood
sugar screenings, United Su-
permarket, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Fourth Fridays
Diabetes Education class, 10
a.m., Golden Plains Commu-
nity Hospital Board Room.
Call 467-5718 or 467-5857
for more information.
Saturdays
Stinnett Clothing Closet,
Church of Christ, 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Call 878-2597 for more
information.
First Saturdays
Lake Meredith Harbor Home
Owners Assoc., 10 a.m., Club
House.
Marine Corps League Haw-
thorne Det. #1349, 9 a.m.,
421 E. Broadway, Stinnett.
Young adults Christian mar-
riage class, Word of Life
Church, 9:45 a.m.Sundays,
Wednesdays, Fridays
Keep It Simple Narcotics
Anonymous, Valley Drive
west entrance, Cedar Street,
7:30 p.m. Call 806-570-2028
or 857-4038 for more infor-
mation
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Submit non-proft organization items by calling 273-5611, e-mail to
feature@borgernewsherald.com, fax to 273-2552 or bring to Borger News-Herald at 207 N. Main.
MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 17, 2014 Borger News- Herald
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIOS
The Place for the Beautiful Face
274-6131 DOWNTOWN BORGER 512 N. MAIN
Foaming Cleanser
Normal/Dry
For Dry and
Normal/Dry skin types.
Richly concentrated
foaming cleanser gently
removes makeup and
impurities, leaving skin
feeling soft, supple, clean
and refreshed. Features
moisturizing botanicals.
Recipe of the Day
Few foods are as universally beloved
as meatballs. There’s something about
the combination of rich meat and bread
crumbs rolled up into a perfect bite-sized
ball that appeals to people of all ages.
One of the great things about meat-
balls is their versatility. Meatballs can
be served as an appetizer, a side dish or
the main course. Meatballs’ versatility
also extends to their ingredients. For ex-
ample, the following recipe for “Goulash
Meatballs,” from Rachael Anne Hill and
Tamsin Burnett-Hall’s “The Powerfood
Cookbook” (Ryland, Peters & Small)
isn’t the traditional meatball recipe, but
it’s delicious nonetheless.
Goulash Meatballs
Serves 6
Sauce
- 2/3 onion, very fnely chopped
- 1 cup chicken broth
- 2 garlic cloves, crushed
- 1 red and 1 green bell pepper, de-
seeded and diced
- 2 teaspoons paprika
- 14 ounces canned chopped toma-
toes
- 1 tablespoon tomato paste
- Sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper
Meatballs
- 1/3 onion, very fnely chopped
- 1 pound, 2 ounces extra lean pork
mince
- 1 slice whole-grain bread, processed
to crumbs
- 1 teaspoon paprika
- 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
- 1 teaspoon dried sage
To serve
- 5 ounces whole-wheat spaghetti
- 1 cups shredded green cabbage
- 1 tablespoons low-fat sour cream
Start the sauce by cooking the onion
in 1/4 cup of the broth in a covered casse-
role for 4 to 5 minutes or until softened.
Stir in the garlic, peppers and paprika
and cook for 1 minute, then add the to-
matoes, tomato paste, and the remaining
broth. Season and simmer, uncovered,
for 10 minutes.
While the sauce is cooking, mix the
meatball ingredients together with sea-
soning and shape into 24 small balls.
Brown the meatballs in 2 batches in a
nonstick frying pan, then add to the sauce
and simmer for 20 minutes.
Cook the spaghetti in a large saucepan
of lightly salted boiling water for 7 min-
utes, then stir in the cabbage and cook
for another 5 minutes. Drain and divide
the pasta and cabbage between warmed
bowls. Spoon the meatballs and sauce
over the pasta and top each serving with
a teaspoon of sour cream.
A delicious take
on an old favorite
3
Do YOU have a recipe that you’d like to see
featured in our “Recipe of the Day” section?
Drop your submissions by the Borger News
Herald at 2nd and Main, or e-mail them to
Feature@borgernewsherald.com
MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 17, 2014 Borger News- Herald
Are you interested in writing a column
for the newspaper? Let us know!
Send your ideas to
editor@borgernewsherald.com
and they could be considered for publication!
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4
TODAY IN HISTORY
364 – Emperor Jovian dies
after a reign of eight months.
He is found dead in his tent
at Tyana (Asia Minor) en
route back to Constantinople
in suspicious circumstances.
1370 – Northern Cru-
sades: Grand Duchy of
Lithuania and the Teutonic
Knights meet in the Battle of
Rudau.
1411 – Following suc-
cessful campaigns during the
Ottoman Interregnum, Musa
Çelebi, one of the sons of
Bayezid I, becomes Sultan
with the support of Mircea I
of Wallachia.
1500 – Duke Friedrich
and Duke Johann attempt
to subdue the peasantry of
Dithmarschen, Denmark, in
the Battle of Hemmingstedt.
1600 – The philosopher
Giordano Bruno is burned
alive, for heresy, at Campo
de’ Fiori in Rome.
1621 – Myles Standish is
appointed as frst commander
of Plymouth colony.
1753 – In Sweden Febru-
ary 17 is followed by March
1 as the country moves from
the Julian calendar to the
Gregorian calendar.
1801 – An electoral tie be-
tween Thomas Jefferson and
Aaron Burr is resolved when
Jefferson is elected President
of the United States and Burr
Vice President by the United
States House of Representa-
tives.
1814 – War of the Sixth
Coalition: The Battle of
Mormans.
1819 – The United States
House of Representatives
passes the Missouri Compro-
mise for the frst time.
1838 – Weenen massacre:
Hundreds of Voortrekkers
along the Blaukraans River,
Natal are killed by Zulus.
1854 – The United King-
dom recognizes the indepen-
dence of the Orange Free
State.
1863 – A group of citi-
zens of Geneva founded an
International Committee
for Relief to the Wounded,
which later became known
as the International Commit-
tee of the Red Cross.
1864 – American Civil
War: The H. L. Hunley be-
comes the frst submarine to
engage and sink a warship,
the USS Housatonic.
1865 – American Civil
War: Columbia, South Caro-
lina, is burned as Confeder-
ate forces fee from advanc-
ing Union forces.
1871 – The victori-
ous Prussian Army parades
through Paris, France after
the end of the Siege of Paris
during the Franco-Prussian
War.
1904 – Madama Butterfy
receives its première at La
Scala in Milan.
1913 – The Armory Show
opens in New York City, dis-
playing works of artists who
are to become some of the
most infuential painters of
the early 20th century.
1933 – The Blaine Act
ends Prohibition in the Unit-
ed States.
1944 – World War II: The
Battle of Eniwetok Atoll be-
gins. The battle ends in an
American victory on Febru-
ary 22.
1944 – World War II:
Operation Hailstone begins.
U.S. naval air, surface, and
submarine attack against
Truk Lagoon, Japan’s main
base in the central Pacifc,
in support of the Eniwetok
invasion.
1949 – Chaim Weizmann
begins his term as the frst
President of Israel.
1959 – Project Van-
guard: Vanguard 2 – The frst
weather satellite is launched
to measure cloud-cover dis-
tribution.
1964 – In Wesberry v.
Sanders the Supreme Court
of the United States rules that
congressional districts have
to be approximately equal in
population.
1964 – Gabonese presi-
dent Leon M’ba is toppled
by a coup and his rival, Jean-
Hilaire Aubame, is installed
in his place.
1965 – Project Ranger:
The Ranger 8 probe launches
on its mission to photograph
the Mare Tranquillitatis re-
gion of the Moon in prepara-
tion for the manned Apollo
missions. Mare Tranquillita-
tis or the “Sea of Tranquil-
ity” would become the site
chosen for the Apollo 11 lu-
nar landing.
1968 – In Springfeld,
Massachusetts, the Naismith
Memorial Basketball Hall of
Fame opens.
1972 – Sales of the Volk-
swagen Beetle exceed those
of the Ford Model-T.
1974 – Robert K. Preston,
a disgruntled U.S. Army pri-
vate, buzzes the White House
in a stolen helicopter.
1978 – The Troubles: The
Provisional IRA detonates an
incendiary bomb at the La
Mon restaurant, near Belfast,
killing 12 and seriously in-
juring 30.
1979 – The Sino-Viet-
namese War begins.
1980 – Mount Everest, 1st
Winter Ascent by Krzysztof
Wielicki and Leszek Cichy.
1992 – Nagorno-Kara-
bakh War: Azerbaijani troops
massacre 70–90 Armenian
civilians in the village of
Qaradağlı
1995 – The Cenepa War
between Peru and Ecuador
ends on a cease-fre brokered
by the UN.
1996 – In Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, world champi-
on Garry Kasparov beats the
Deep Blue supercomputer in
a chess match.
1996 – NASA’s Discov-
ery Program begins as the
NEAR Shoemaker space-
craft lifts off on the frst mis-
sion ever to orbit and land on
an asteroid, 433 Eros.
2003 – The London Con-
gestion Charge scheme be-
gins.
2006 – A massive mud-
slide occurs in Southern
Leyte, Philippines; the off-
cial death toll is set at 1,126.
2008 – Kosovo declares
independence.
2011 – Libyan protests
begin. In Bahrain, security
forces launched a deadly pre-
dawn raid on protesters in
Pearl Roundabout in Mana-
ma, the day is locally known
as Bloody Thursday.
Opinion
I was almost 17, and
the Valentine’s Day girls’
choice dance was to be
my first date. I had not yet
been on a date, because,
when it came to dealings
with those of the opposite
gender, I was extremely
timid.
There would be four of
us together - my date, her
friend, her friend’s date,
and myself. I was the only
one with access to a car,
so I would be driving.
The problem was that
the car I had access to
was getting older and had
some problems. The big-
gest problem was that the
transmission was going
out. When the car would
start out from a stopped
position, the transmis-
sion would jump into 2nd
gear, and then drop back
to first gear, then to 2nd,
then back to 1st, and so
on, until it got up to about
30 miles per hour. At that
point, it would finally stay
in one gear and the driv-
ing would smooth out.
This problem caused the
car to lurch and buck like
a bronc coming out of the
gate at a rodeo.
I had informed the oth-
ers in our group about this,
and they said they were
okay with it, especially
since it was the only car
available.
At school on Friday,
the day before the big
dance, my date came and
checked once more to
make sure I would have
a car. When I told her I
would, she smiled her
beautiful smile. “It will be
fun. We are going to have
a wonderful dinner with
sparkling grape juice and
everything.”
After she left, I turned
to my friend, Lenny, who
was with me. “What is
sparkling grape juice?” I
asked.
“It’s like wine,” he an-
swered.
“Like wine?”
My naiveté must have
shown in the concerned
look on my face, because
he laughed. “Don’t worry;
it’s not alcoholic. It just
tastes like wine, bites
like wine, and smells like
wine.”
“Okay,” I said, still not
sure.
We did have a lot of
fun the night of the dance.
The girls had spent the
day preparing the food,
and it was very good.
The sparkling grape juice
was delicious, and we all
drank plenty, though all
the bubbles in it made us
feel a bit queasy. Finally,
it was time to go to the
dance.
I tried to ease the car
out onto the road as care-
fully as I could, hoping it
would go smoothly, but
the car was quite rebel-
lious and would have none
of it. It bucked, jerked,
and chugged. The slosh-
ing, bubbly grape juice in
our stomachs made them
churn. My date’s friend
said, “I think I am going
to barf.”
Luckily, she didn’t,
and everyone soon felt
better as the car smoothed
out for the long ride into
town. But there was one
more place we had to
come to a complete stop.
After we stopped there,
I once more, carefully,
started forward. But even
more than before, the
car bucked, jumped, and
lurched. I felt sick, but
the others were having an
even harder time.
Just as the car was set-
tling down, I saw red and
blue lights flashing in my
rear view mirror. I pulled
over, and the police of-
ficer came up and shined
his flashlight in my face.
He then swung it around
to look at the others in the
car who were swallow-
ing air to keep from los-
ing their dinner. He swung
the light back to me, and
spoke gruffly. “I saw how
you drove away from that
stop sign. Have you been
drinking?”
“No, officer,” I said.
He looked at me suspi-
ciously, then said, “Well, I
can see you are all dressed
to go to the dance. I won’t
make you walk a line. Just
let me smell your breath.”
That was when I re-
membered Lenny’s line
about how sparkling
grape juice smelled like
wine. I quickly tried to
explain about the car’s
transmission and the spar-
kling grape juice. When I
finished, he was grinning.
“All right,” he said. “I
think you can go.”
“Thanks for under-
standing,” I replied.
“Oh, I believe you,”
he said, laughing. “No
one that was drunk could
make up a story half that
good. I can’t wait to share
this one with the other of-
ficers.”
And with that, he let us
go, and we headed on our
way, with our car stagger-
ing its way to the dance.
Valentine’s Day Problems
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2012
Daris Howard
Life’s Outtakes
BEETLE BAILEY
ZITS
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
HI AND LOIS
ASTROGRAPH
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
A friend or someone in a group
might be critical of you today.
Or perhaps you feel intimidated
by this person. Either way, don’t
let this get you down. Tomorrow
is a better day.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
This is a poor day to ask
authority fgures for permission
or approval, because they will
likely reject you because people
are quick to criticize today. (It’s
a grumpy day.)
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Your efforts to study something
might meet with obstacles today.
Similarly, travel plans might
get bogged down with rules and
regulations. Ditto for all your
activities. Oh well.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
News from your bank
or someone else about
shared property, debt, taxes,
inheritances and insurance
matters might be bleak. No
money! This is a discouraging
day; wait until tomorrow.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Because people are inclined to
be critical of each other today,
conversations with partners and
close friends might be a bummer.
Just say something nice.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Co-workers are not
encouraging, and bosses are
downright discouraging today.
It’s one of those days. It’s not a
good day to ask for cooperation
or permission.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Children feel like an increased
responsibility today. This
happens sometimes. Romantic
relationships are a bit sour as
well. Just grin and bear it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
This is not an ideal day to talk
to authority fgures in the family
(parents or older relatives)
because they will be critical and
discouraging. It is what it is.
Postpone these discussions until
tomorrow.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to
Dec. 21)
You might fall into worry mode
today, which is not good for your
sign! Sagittarians need to be
optimistic and physically active
to survive.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan.
19)
Financial matters and cash fow
might discourage you today. This
is a poor day to pitch new ideas
at work or ask other people for
money. People are tightfsted.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18)
Tackle heavy metal work that
requires disciplined thinking
today. Your critical faculties are
sharp, and you will excel doing
routine, detail-oriented work.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20)
This is an excellent day for
research, because you will not
overlook anything. Nothing is
too much trouble, because you
want to do the job well. Plus,
you want results.
MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 17, 2014
Borger News- Herald
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DEAR ABBY: My husband
and I have been married for
three years. I trust him with my
whole heart. He is the sweet-
est man I know. Lately, I have
been wanting to know more
about his brother. My husband
hasn’t said much about him
other than he was murdered in
prison about 10 years ago.
I’m not saying that he and
his family are lying, but I did
some research on the Web and
came across multiple websites
about my husband’s brother.
Yes, he was in prison, but I’m
not sure he was actually mur-
dered there. Some details are
better left unsaid.
I know, of course, that you
can’t believe everything you
read on the Internet, but there
is more than one Google page
with a lot of information.
I want to talk to my hus-
band and fnd out what re-
ally happened and try to get
to know his brother, but I’m
scared he will get angry and
even shut me out, and I don’t
want that to happen. Please
give me some advice on what
to do. I just want some straight
answers -- no more sweeping
it under the carpet. -- IN THE
DARK IN OHIO
DEAR IN THE DARK:
There is always a risk when
someone goes poking around
the family closet and starts rat-
tling the skeletons. I suggest
you be frank with your hus-
band. Tell him you were curi-
ous about his brother, went on
the Internet, found some sur-
prising information and would
like some honest answers. If
you trust him with your whole
heart, then his response will tell
you all you need to know.
DEAR ABBY: I am a wid-
ow with fve daughters. The
youngest is 8, and the others
are in their late teens and early
20s. I am self-employed, work
from home and very involved
in my kids’ lives.
I have a boyfriend I have
been seeing for the last 18
months. I spend the night with
him two or three times a month,
which involves less than a 24-
hour stay.
I would like to have an
extended weekend or a short
vacation with him, but he is
balking. He says I shouldn’t be
away from my baby that long.
He grew up with a very distant
mother and had an unhappy
childhood. My daughter spends
a lot of time with me, but still
enjoys her “sister time.”
How can I get him to real-
ize that my being away for a
few days would recharge me
and make me a better mom?
-- BADLY IN NEED OF A
BREAK
DEAR BADLY IN NEED:
If you haven’t already pointed
out to this man that his child-
hood was far different than the
one you have provided for your
children, then you should.
I am somewhat concerned
that he is giving you parenting
advice, since nowhere in your
letter did you mention that he
has any children. It occurs to
me that he may have his own
reasons for not spending more
time with you than he does, and
if I’m right, you need to get to
the bottom of what they are --
because I don’t think he’s giv-
ing you the whole story.
DEAR ABBY: My husband
goes into a tirade if anyone
has a taste of food or a bread
roll before a meal is properly
served. He goes off on every-
one -- even a child who has had
to wait because the meal is late
or they just love light rolls.
We have great respect for
your answers. He threatened to
write you, so I called his bluff.
What do you think about this?
-- LOSING MY APPETITE
IN VIRGINIA
DEAR LOSING: I think
your husband appears to be ex-
cessively controlling. For him to
expect hungry people to sit at a
table with food and not partake
of it is unrealistic, unless it’s a
formal dinner party. Children
should be taught proper table
manners, but to force a hungry
child to sit at a table with bread
on it for fear of a tirade is, in my
opinion, abusive.
People sometimes overreact
the way your husband does be-
cause they have low blood sug-
ar. Could this be his problem?
Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Write
Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
What teens need to know about
sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along
with peers and parents is in “What
Every Teen Should Know.” Send
your name and mailing address,
plus check or money order for $7
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Teen
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping
and handling are included in the
price.)
Curious wife seeks truth
about a mysterious death
Dear Abby
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274-2142
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Dam and surrounding
areas – Must possess a
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Borger News- Herald
Sports 8
MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 17, 2014
Send us your Fan Pics:
sports@borgernewsherald.com
LOCAL SPORTS POSTERS
NOW AVAILABLE:
• Borger Bulldogs Football & Volleyball
• West Texas Comaches Football & Volleyball
• Sanford-Fritch Football Eagles Football & Volleyball
• FPC Plainsmen Volleyball
$15.
00
EACH
COME BY & GET YOURS AT
THE BORGER NEWS-HERALD
On Friday FPC lost to
Northern Oklahoma College.
Game one’s fnal score was
0-8, NOC. Game two was
2-4 NOC.
Frank Phillips College
hosted McCook Community
College on Saturday, in a
softball game.
The frst game they played
, the Lady Plainsmen won
with a fnal score of 11-9.
WP:
Austin Murillo (1-0)
R: Kelly Ayala (3);
Trinidad Barrera (1);
Ashley Hight (3);
Bernadette Garcia (3)
RBI:
Ashley Hight (1);
Bernadette Garcia
(5);
Lesa Murphy (3);
Tiffany Britton (1)
HR:
Bernadette Garcia (1)
(First Collegiate HR)
Not bad for the frst game.
Great job girls!
Then the second game
was played, unlike the frst.
Unfortunately, the Lady
Plainsmen lost this game to
McCook with the fnal score
of 7-6. Although FPC only
lost by one little point.
LP:
Austin Murillo (1-1)
R:
Erica Chasco (1);
Ashley Hight (2);
Bernadette Garcia
(2);
Des’ree Wainright
(1)
RBI:
Erica Chasco (1);
Bernadette Garcia
(2);
Lesa Murphy (1);
Tiffany Britton (1)
It may have been a loss,
but it was a super close game.
Great job again ladies.
On Sunday’s games
against Trinidad, FPC won
the frst game with a fnal
score of 7-6 and the second
game FPC also wins with a
score of 6-2.
Go Lady Plainsmen!
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
FPC’s long weekend of games started on Friday
SPORTS
MONDAY, APRIL 15
TUESDAY, APRIL 16
FRIDAY, APRIL 19
SATURDAY, APRIL 20
BORGER TRACK @ CANYON - 1-3A/2-3A AREA MEET
FPC BASEBALL VS. ODESSA COLLEGE - 12:00 (DH)
BORGER SOFTBALL (V) VS. RIVER ROAD - 4:30 (JV AFTER)
FPC SOFTBALL VS. CLARENDON COLLEGE - 5:00 (DH)
FPC BASEBALL VS. ODESSA COLLEGE - 12:00 (DH)
BORGER BASEBALL (V) VS. RIVER ROAD - 12:00
FPC SOFTBALL @ CLARENDON COLLEGE - 1:00 (DH)
BORGER BASEBALL (JV) VS. RIVER ROAD - 2:30
WTHS BASEBALL (V) VS. BOOKER - 4:30
BORGER GIRLS GOLF @ LUBBOCK - REGIONALS
BROUGHT TO YOU BY:
W. H. HANK LANDERS, M.D.
Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine
600 S. Cedar, Ste. 400
Borger, TX • 806-274-3645
GO BULLDOGS!
THE WEEK AHEAD IN
MONDAY, February 17
Borger vs Randall (softball pre-game) @ 4:30
Borger vs Shallowater in Dimmitt High School @ 8pm
(Basketball Playoff)
Frank Phillips vs Clarendon @ 5:30 & 7:30 (Home) BB
TUESDAY, February 18
Bulldog Tennis @ Amarillo Small School
WEDNESDAY, February 19
Frank Phillips @ Garden City (Baseball/Softball)
THURSDAY, February 20
FPC Basketball vs South Plains(Away)
Bulldog Tennis @ SPCHEA (Levelland)
FRIDAY, February 21
Bulldog Tennis @ SPCHEA(Levelland)
SATURDAY, February 22
Frank Phillips vs Redlands CC(Home) Noon
SUNDAY, February 23
Thursday the Comanches
won their game against Per-
ryton with a fnal score of
10-9.
Looks like they are going
to keep it up. Saturday’s game
was a huge win for West Tex-
as High School(2-0).
The Comanches soft-
ball team ran all over River
Road(0-1) in a non-con-
ferance game. West Texas
walks away winners with a
fnal score of 14 - 4.
Way to go Comanches!
Great job.
Deanna Bejarano
Sports Editor
Comanches scalped
River Road
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
(AP) — With the famed No.
3 on his car and memories of
the late Dale Earnhardt fresh
in his mind, Austin Dillon
took the fabled number out
of hibernation and straight to
the top at Daytona.
Dillon reawakened the
days of The Intimidator and
proved he can handle the
spotlight thrust on his ride in
the 3, winning the pole Sun-
day for the season-opening
Daytona 500.
He took the top spot with
a lap at 196.019 mph in NA-
SCAR’s season opener in a
car Richard Childress has re-
fused to feld at NASCAR’s
top level since Earnhardt’s
fatal accident on the last lap
of the 2001 race.
But with his 23-year-old
grandson ready to move to
the Sprint Cup Series, Chil-
dress allowed Dillon to use
the number widely associ-
ated with the seven-time
champion. Earnhardt won 67
races, six championships and
the 1998 Daytona 500 driv-
ing the No. 3.
Dillon was a kid when
he posed for a picture with
Earnhardt in Victory Lane
following his breakthough
1998 win.
He’ll have many more
memories from this mile-
stone, like the congratulatory
handshake he received from
Richard Petty when qualify-
ing ended.
NASCAR’s family roots
run deep, so Childress never
had to leave the family tree
to fnd the right driver for the
number.
Dillon has been using it
in NASCAR national com-
petition since 2009, when he
made his Truck Series debut
in the No. 3. He won the
Truck championship in 2011
driving the No. 3 for Richard
Childress Racing, and the
Nationwide title last season
in the same number.
So Childress knew — he
always knew and has insisted
that Earnhardt gave his bless-
ing long before his death
— that Dillon could use the
number if he ever made it to
Cup.
Dillon doesn’t take the re-
sponsibility lightly.
“Everybody wants to see
this number perform well,
and that’s what my goals
are,” Dillon said. “I love get-
ting in that race car and driv-
ing it. I think once we get
through some of these races
here at the beginning of the
year, everything will sink in
and I’ll get comfortable and
be able to have some fun.”
It’s the fourth time the No.
3 has won the pole for the
Daytona 500. Buddy Baker
did it in 1969, Ricky Rudd in
1983 and Earnhardt in 1996.
Martin Truex Jr., driving
a Chevrolet for Furniture
Row Racing, qualifed sec-
ond with a lap at 195.852
mph. Truex’s engine is built
by Earnhardt-Childress Rac-
ing, giving the company a
sweep of the Daytona 500
front row.
“Obviously, without that
thing under the hood, we
wouldn’t be where we are,”
said Truex, who won the
Daytona 500 pole in 2009
with an ECR engine when he
drove for Earnhardt Ganassi
Racing.
The rest of the feld is set
Thursday through a pair of
qualifying races, but Chil-
dress and the ECR engines
are strong: They had fve cars
in the top 12 on Sunday.
Childress knew he had a
shot at the pole, if not with
Dillon then from another one
of his four Richard Childress
Racing entries. All were fast
in January testing, and again
in two Saturday practice ses-
sions.
But it was Hendrick Mo-
torsports driver Dale Earn-
hardt Jr., the frst driver to
make his qualifying attempt,
who set the pace early and
held down the provisional
pole for most of the session.
RCR drivers Brian Scott and
Paul Menard failed to bump
Earnhardt, and it was surpris-
ingly Ford driver Greg Biffe
who fnally did it as the 33rd
driver to take his turn.
Ryan Newman then took
his shot for RCR and missed,
and Dillon was the next driv-
er out.
He shot to the top of the
board and his grandfather
pumped his fst in celebration.
He then nervously watched
as the fnal 10 drivers made
their runs, and gave another
fst-pump in celebration.
“We wanted to come
down here and put on a good
show with the 3, and to have
another ECR engine with
Furniture Row on the front
row, we couldn’t be more
proud,” Childress said.
So could he fnally relax?
“The pressure is always
on when you’ve got grand-
sons racing for you,” said
Childress, who thanked all
the sponsors who “believed
in this young kid, who took
a chance on him.”
Austin Dillon puts No. 3
on pole for Daytona 500
BC-AP Sportlight Feb. 17
1923 — Cy Denneny of
the Ottawa Senators becomes
the NHL’s all-time scorer.
Denneny scores his 143rd
goal to surpass Joe Malone
in a 2-0 win over the Mon-
treal Canadiens.
1924 — Johnny
Weissmuller sets a world
record in the 100-yard free-
style swim with a time of
52.4 seconds.
1926 — In a tourna-
ment at the Carlton Club in
Cannes, France, Suzanne
Lenglen beats Helen Wills
6-3, 8-6 in their only tennis
match against each other.
1928 — Sweden’s Gillis
Grafstrom defends his 1920
and 1924 Olympic fgure
skating title with Austrian
Willy Bockl fnishing in sec-
ond place as he did four years
earlier.
1941 — Joe Louis knocks
out Gus Dorazio in the sec-
ond round at the Convention
Hall in Philadelphia to de-
fend his world heavyweight
title.
1967 — Philadelphia’s
Wilt Chamberlain hits the
frst of what would become
an NBA record 35 consecu-
tive feld goals without a
miss.
1991 — Ernie Irvan,
helped by Dale Earnhardt’s
continuing misfortune in
NASCAR’s top stock car
race, wins the Daytona 500
under a caution fag.
1992 — Raisa Smetanina
wins a gold medal with the
Unifed Team in the 20-kilo-
meter cross-country relay to
set the career Winter Olym-
pic Games medal record with
10. Smetanina, 3 9, also be-
comes the oldest champion
and the frst to win a medal in
fve straight Winter Games.
1994 — San Antonio’s
David Robinson records the
fourth quadruple-double in
NBA history with 34 points,
10 rebounds, 10 assists and
10 blocks in the Spurs’ 115-
96 win over Detroit.
1998 — The U.S. wom-
en’s hockey team wins the
sport’s frst-ever Olympic
gold medal. Sandra Whyte
scores on an empty-netter
with 8 seconds left to give
the United States a 3-1 vic-
tory over Canada.
1999 — Australia’s Susie
O’Neill shatters swimming’s
oldest record, breaking the
200-meter butterfy world
mark with a time of 2:05.37
in a World Cup short-course
meet at Malmo, Sweden.
O’Neill broke the record
of 2:05.65 set by Mary T.
Meagher of the United States
in 1981.
2001 — Arnold Palmer,
71, becomes the frst player
to shoot his age in a PGA
Tour event since Sam Snead
did 22 years ago. Palmer
fnishes the fourth round of
the Bob Hope Classic with a
1-under 71. Joe Durant sets
a 72-hole record of 29 under
for a fve-shot lead. Durant,
with rounds of 65-61-67-66,
breaks the 72-hole record for
relation to par set by John
Huston in the 1998 Hawaiian
Open.
2007 — Kenenisa Bekele
of Ethiopia sets a world re-
cord for the indoor 2,000
meters with a time of 4:49.99
at the Norwich Union Grand
Prix, beating a 9-year-old
mark of Haile Gebrselassie.
Gebrselassie set the mark
of 4:52.86 in February 1998
at the same National Indoor
Arena.
2007 — Miami’s Jason
Kapono ties a record with 24
points to beat stars Gilbert
Arenas and Dirk Nowitzki
in the 3-Point Shootout. Bos-
ton’s Gerald Green caps All-
Star Saturday with an acro-
batic leap over a table to win
the Slam Dunk contest.
2008 — Ryan Newman
snaps an 81-race winless
streak, using a huge push
from teammate Kurt Busch
to give car owner Roger Pen-
ske his frst Daytona 500 vic-
tory.
2008 — Ray Allen scores
28 points, making three
straight 3-pointers in the f-
nal 3:15, and LeBron James
adds 27 as the East, widely
considered the NBA’s weak-
er half, beat the Western
Conference 134-128 in the
All-Star Game.
2010 — Americans Lind-
sey Vonn and Julia Mancuso
capture gold and silver, re-
spectively, in the women’s
Olympic downhill at Van-
couver, British Columbia.
It’s the frst time since 1984
that the United States cap-
tures the top two steps in a
women’s alpine skiing event.
The second multi-podium
performance of the day goes
to Shani Davis who takes
the gold and Chad Hedrick
who grabs bronze in men’s
1000-meter speedskating.
Davis is the frst U.S. male
speedskater to successfully
defend his Olympic title.
Shaun White wins gold in
the snowboard halfpipe to
become the third American
male to successfully defend
an Olympic gold medal,
joining Dick Button (fgure
skating, 1948 and 1952) and
Davis.
2013 — Danica Patrick
wins the Daytona 500 pole,
becoming the frst woman to
secure the top spot for any
Sprint Cup race.
2013 — Kevin Durant
scores 30 points, MVP Chris
Paul has 20 points and 15 as-
sists, and the Western Confer-
ence beats the East 143-138
in the NBA All-Star game.
Sportlight
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