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McDonald Qualifies For U.S. Open; Women Excel In School

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 5:37pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – What a splash Ally McDonald is making as professional golfer.

Bulldogs Land La. Tech Transfer Xavian Stapleton

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 5:18pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – After spending his freshman campaign at Louisiana Tech, Xavian Stapleton has decided to return to his home state to finish out his collegiate career.

Robson Named Cape Cod Baseball League Player of the Week

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 4:55pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Mississippi State outfielder Jacob Robson was named Cape Cod Baseball League Player of the Week, the league announced Monday.

Prescott, Jones and Redmond On Watch Lists For National Awards

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 11:00am
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Mississippi State senior quarterback Dak Prescott was named to the watch list for the 79th edition of the Maxwell Award, the Maxwell Football Club announced Tuesday.

Sosebee taking funny to Lovington

Twisted Rodeo - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 9:46am
 Springdale, Ark.; Cheyenne, Wyo.; Dodge City, Kan.; and Lovington, N.M. He returns to Lovington to work this year's Lea County Fair and Rodeo.

Rodeo clown Cody Sosebee interacts with fans during a recent rodeo in Guymon, Okla. This month features a busy part of his schedule, moving from one large rodeo to another: Springdale, Ark.; Cheyenne, Wyo.; Dodge City, Kan.; and Lovington, N.M. He returns to Lovington to work this year’s Lea County Fair and Rodeo.

LOVINGTON, N.M. – Much has changed around the Lea County Fair and Rodeo since the last time Cody Sosebee was the entertainer inside Jake McClure Arena.

“The Lovington rodeo has a lot of chrome on it now and is really bright and shiney,” said Sosebee, who will be the rodeo clown and entertainer during the five nights of rodeo action, beginning with the Lea County Xtreme Bulls on Tuesday, Aug. 4, and continuing through the full rodeo performances from Wednesday, Aug. 5-Saturday, Aug. 8. All performances begin at 7:30 p.m.

“It’s a lot different now than it was then. The rodeo has finally been recognized as one of the best, and they have Xtreme Bulls and Pete Carr’s bucking stock. It’s really a special rodeo.”

That it is. The Lea County rodeo has been nominated as the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Large Outdoor Rodeo of the Year each of the past two seasons. That’s quite an honor for an event that’s in the same class as the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days and the Pendleton (Ore.) Roundup.

“That’s a super good committee, and you can tell they’ve worked their butts off to make a good rodeo even better,” he said. “When they came to tell me they were excited to have me coming back, it really was a great thing for me. I love that rodeo.”

The rodeo committee isn’t the only entity that’s been honored with nominations and awards. Sosebee is a five-time nominee for PRCA Clown of the Year and a two-time finalist for Comedy Act of the Year. He will be a big part of the action that is orchestrated by Pete Carr Pro Rodeo, the primary livestock producer that’s been nominated for Stock Contractor of the Year in 2013-14.

“You get to work with an A team of personnel and an A team list of stock,” he said. “Anytime you get to work with people who excel in their field, it only makes me that much better.”

In addition to his clowning nomination, the former competitor also has been nominated for the PRCA Comedy Act of the Year two of the past three seasons. But there’s much more to Sosebee than meets the eye. Over his lifetime, he’s competed in nearly every rodeo event possible and was at the top of his game in bareback riding.

It’s part of the life growing up in a family that was heavily involved in rodeo. His father was a pickup man, so Sosebee has been part of the sport as long as he can remember.

“I got into clowning by accident by filling in for guys,” said Sosebee, who also owns a barbecue restaurant in his hometown of Charleston, Ark., just 25 miles east of Fort Smith, Ark. “I didn’t know where I was going to go with my rodeo career when I quit riding barebacks, and it turned into a good living. I get to see the world.

“I live in a community with one four-way stop, and I get to go to a lot of great places where as soon as you pull into town, you are considered a rock star for a week.”

A born competitor, the clown has made the adjustments he needed to get the true fix after a lifetime of being part of the contest.

“I’ve always been a competitor in anything I did, from football to basketball to when I was in freestyle bullfighting,” he said. “I miss putting my hand in the riggin’ and nodding my head to be 80 points to win the rodeo, but I’m a realist. I’m 43 years old. While most of the guys I rodeoed with have slowed down and have found jobs, I get to be in the arena and get to make a living in rodeo doing something I love.”

Sosebee also plays to his strengths. Bigger than many in the game, he showcases a true athleticism that is rarely seen among men of his stature. It’s comedy at the purest level.

“Having the ability to laugh at myself is probably my biggest strength,” he said. “I don’t take anything too serious. When I’m watching a comedian, the funniest thing I see is when they’re honestly open and having a good time. I want the fans to see that I’m a real person and I’m having fun, and they can have fun with me.”

That’s why Sosebee has excelled as one of the premier rodeo clowns in the game. That’s why the volunteer committee is bringing him to town. It’s another key reason the Lea County Fair and Rodeo is always at the top of the game.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Former Diamond Dawg Papelbon Named MLB All-Star For Sixth Time

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 11:37pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Former Mississippi State pitcher Jonathan Papelbon was named to the 2015 Major League Baseball National League All-Star team, MLB announced late Monday night.

Bulldogs Among Nation’s Best In Final NCAA Attendance Rankings

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 5:04pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Another season attendance record has placed Mississippi State women's basketball among the nation's best in the final attendance rankings released by the NCAA Monday.

Prevent Water Damage And Cut Insurance Costs

Lifestyles - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 8:32am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Water damage is the second most common reason for homeowners to file claims with their insurance companies; only home fires are associated with more damage and more claims. Water damage can stem from a variety of sources, including leaking water heaters, ruptured washing machine hoses, leaky pipes and failed plumbing systems. These leaks can cause flooding that can stain ceilings, warp floors and destroy personal property anywhere in the home.

Another consequence of leaks and water damage: mold. Indoor mold is an additional source of damage that, according to the Insurance Information Institute, costs the average $3,000 to $4,000; while water damage combined with mold yields homeowner insurance claims ranging from $15,000 to $30,000.

Mold can damage walls, stain ceilings, ruin carpeting and damage home ventilation systems.

Mold also has the potential to damage personal items, including personal electronics, clothing with sentimental value (such as a wedding dress) and fine art.

Not only is mold almost impossible to remove, it contributes to poor air quality in the home, which can cause health problems for homeowners with allergies or asthma. Even non-allergic individuals may experience skin and eye irritation or respiratory problems in moldy environments. Although visible mold can be cleaned from walls, and moldy rugs can be replaced, homeowners with mold problems must consider how to reduce or control the moisture content in the home.

An automatic water shut-off system can help stop mold before it starts by identifying leaks before they lead to major water damage. One example of such a system, FloLogic, acts as a circuit breaker for home plumbing. The System shuts off the water when it detects a leak, whether it is a pinhole leak, running faucet or malfunctioning appliance causing a flood. The FloLogic System automatically shuts off the water and alerts the homeowner with an alarm so the leak can be identified and repaired as soon as possible, limiting the water damage.

Homeowners who install and use a system such as FloLogic may be able to avoid the costly insurance claims associated with water damage. Some homeowners' insurance companies recognize the benefits of such systems and may offer discounts to homeowners who install devices to protect against water damage.

Visit www.flologic.com for more details about how the FloLogic System works.

How to Sit Through a Movie in Comfort

Lifestyles - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 8:27am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Movies have always fascinated Americans. They are a way to escape reality (if only for a couple of hours), a place to stay cool on hot summer days, a typically pure, unadulterated enjoyment.

Cinemas are now capitalizing on this from of entertainment by boasting reserved seating, fancier food than your standard popcorn and soda, and best of all, adult beverages -- all for a high-end price.

The rise of "dine-in" theaters aims to put the traditional dinner-and-a-movie all in the same place, instead of making people rush from one venue to another.

"It's a way for theater owners to capture that revenue and keep it there instead of seeing it go down the mall," Patrick Corcoran, vice president and chief communications officer for the National Association of Theatre Owners, told USA Today in an interview.

However, even with all the bells and whistles that are part and parcel of many movie theaters, there are still things you may want to bring to make your experience that much more pleasurable, as well as do's and don'ts to attending your favorite flick.

Do Bring an Extra Sweater

Movie theaters tend to get cold (which is why they're a great place to go in the summer), so bringing a long-sleeve shirt, or light sweater or jacket, is never a bad idea. You can also forego it if the theater temperature suits you.

Silence Your Phone

Out of respect to those around you, don't forget to turn your phone to vibrate, or better yet, turn it off completely. This way, you won't be tempted to see if anyone has texted you.

Don't Start a Conversation

While people have their thoughts on any given movie or scene, or want to opine with their date about whodunit, keep the chit-chat to a minimum. Even over the superior sound systems used in movie theaters today, voices still carry.

Portable Accessories

If you are a smokeless tobacco user, you might want to consider purchasing a portable spittoon. Look at it this way: taking a bottle or cup to a luxury theater is not a viable option (especially if it's a first date). But portable spittoons, such as those created by FLASR (OTCQB:FLSR), are discreet and, according to Everett Dickson, CEO of FLASR, "allows users to enjoy smokeless tobacco in public unobtrusively, without unwanted attention." To this end, the company's new 4-ounce pocket spittoon lets users open and shut it with just one hand. And FLASR's original tobacco flask has an advanced closing mechanism, ensuring that it stays closed when not in use, eliminating the possibility of spills and leaks.

For more information, visit www.flasr.com. Market listing: FLASR (OTCQB: FLSR).

FMX team to jump into Dodge City

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 5:28pm
The members of Wisconsin Freestyle MotoCross will be part of the action during this year's Dodge City Roundup Rodeo, set for Wednesday, July 29-Sunday, Aug. 2, at Roundup Arena. (PHOTO COURTESY WIFMX)

The members of Wisconsin Freestyle MotoCross will be part of the action during this year’s Dodge City Roundup Rodeo, set for Wednesday, July 29-Sunday, Aug. 2, at Roundup Arena. (PHOTO COURTESY WIFMX)

DODGE CITY, Kan. – Cody Cavanaugh, Mike Keiper and Josh Mertens have different thoughts on horsepower than most who are involved with the 2015 Dodge City Roundup Rodeo.

They are an integral part of Wisconsin Freestyle Motocross, which will be one of the featured pieces of entertainment during the five performances of the rodeo, set for 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 29-Sunday, Aug. 2. The three athletes will put on a spectacular display of freestyle motocross jumps inside Roundup Arena.

“We’re pretty excited about working that event,” said Cavanaugh, the founder of WIFMX, based in Neenah, Wis. “We always like going to new places. You get to meet the rodeo committee members and usually make good friends that way. It’s also nice for us to see a different culture.”

The WIFMX players all have extensive motocross experience. Now in their third year as a specialty act in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, Cavanaugh and staff travel the rodeo trail putting on shows that expose some amazing feats on the backs of motorcycles.

“One of the things that make our show unique is that quite a few of us can ride motorcycles and jump four-wheelers,” he said. “I like the way we’re diverse in that way.”

It’s just another big piece of the entertainment pie that is Roundup Rodeo, which was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2012. It already is a key stop on the ProRodeo trail and will feature hundreds of the top contestants in the game. By combining with WIFMX, the volunteer rodeo committee that produces the annual event is just increasing the value for fans.

“We take a lot of pride in having the very best in rodeo,” said Dr. R.C. Trotter, chairman of the committee. “We have world champions in every performance of our rodeo, and we wanted to bring something else to the table for our great fans to enjoy.

“A lot of people come back to our rodeo year after year, and we always want to give them something special to enjoy. I believe having Cody Cavanaugh and his group here will really help make this year’s rodeo even better.”

Though his primary focus is on riding motorcycles, Cavanaugh grew up in a rodeo family. His parents were raised in South Dakota, and his father grew up on a farm and was part of rodeo as a roper and barrelman.

“When my parents moved to Wisconsin, we had horses on the farm right away, and we still have a horse-drawn carriage business we still run,” he said. “We have a hobby farm with petting-zoo animals. That’s how I had room enough to ride motorcycles around Wisconsin.”

He was outfitted with a three-wheeler at age 3, then moved on to his first dirt bike at 7. He started building little jumps with friends, then the jumps kept getting bigger. He loved the idea of FMX because of what he had seen on television and found it to be a great outlet.

Of course, being outside and active was a big part of how he was raised.

“As a kid, I roped quite a bit, and I come from a horse background,” Cavanaugh said. “In fact, our jumps are set up in a horse pasture.”

The WIFMX team now has a customized ramping system it takes to rodeos all across the country, from Pleasant Grove, Utah, to Park Rapids, Minn., to Dodge City. It takes just a few minutes of set-up time, and the excitement in the arena takes off. That’s where Cavanaugh, Keiper and Mertens show off the elaborate tricks they’ve perfected over the years.

“There is a small crashing curve that comes with learning new tricks,” Cavanaugh said. “If you’re going to push yourself, it can sometimes not end well. With a lot of practice, our confidence grew.

“I tell people all the time that we’ve been allowed to do these cool jobs of just riding motorcycles. Find something you like to do and do it all the time.”

It works for the WIFMX team, and for fans that make their way to Roundup Arena.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Summer Ball Q&A: Sophomore Outfielder Brent Rooker

Bulldog Beat - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 2:09pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. - For the month of July, HailState.com will interview select Mississippi State baseball players competing across the country in summer leagues.

County fair celebrates 80 years

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 12:12pm

LOVINGTON, N.M. – Eight decades ago, Jake McClure was the dominant calf roper in rodeo; the Lea County, N.M., cowboy had revolutionized his event and had earned titles at the most prestigious events in the game.

His hometown event, the Lea County Fair and Rodeo, was established in his heyday. This August, the exposition will celebrate its 80th year. Inside the expansive fairgrounds on the eastern edge of Lovington sits Jake McClure Arena, home to one of the most recognized events in ProRodeo.

Lea County Fair Logo“No matter the amount of time that goes by, it’s the one thing that brings the county together every year,” said Corey Helton, chairman of the Lea County Fair Board. “It’s gotten bigger over the years, especially lately with the concerts and the rodeo. It’s the one event that the residents of Lea County know is going to happen every year.”

This year’s celebration is set for Friday, July 31-Saturday, Aug. 8, and will feature a touch of the historic, a splash of the new generation and a bushel of fun. The best part is the admission is just $8 for adults and $6 for children.

“A lot of people in this part of the country take pride in the county fair,” Helton said. “Every year it gets better and better, and I think people expect it to be what it is.”

From the great concerts – Ricochet, Cody Johnson, Crowder, Dan & Shay, Scotty McCreery and Gregg Allman – to the various livestock shows to Lea County Xtreme Bulls and the rodeo to the food and carnival, there are numerous reasons why this county fair is such a must-see event.

“I think we all know the fair actually started with the kids and showcasing the kids’ hard work throughout the year with the livestock shows,” Helton said. “We can never lose sight of that. It’s still about that. It’s about the sale. That’s the big thing about the fair. Yeah, we’ve had the concerts and the rodeo, but without the kids showing animals, do you really have a fair?

“The goal of every fair should be the kids.”

The Lovington event is more than just a county fair. The Lea County Fair and Rodeo has been recognized as one of the top expositions in the region, and there’s good reason. There is a concert six nights of the nine-day event, and the rodeo will feature the very best in the game, cowboys and cowgirls who will have traveled hundreds of miles to compete in southeastern New Mexico and some of the top animals in the business from Pete Carr Pro Rodeo.

“I think one of the things that’s still part of the 80-year tradition is the rodeo,” Helton said. “We continue to draw the top 10 cowboys in each event.”

It’s something Jake McClure surely would brag about if he were still on the rodeo trail. It’s something many people from Lea County talk about each summer as they anticipate the goings-on in Lovington.

“We’re going to be working with the Western Heritage Museum and recognize some of the older people in the community that have contributed so much over the years,” Helton said. “We all wanted to provide something for the people that have contributed something to the heritage of Lea County.”

It should be quite the celebration.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo
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