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Pieters Records Another Solid Round For MSU

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 9:00pm
Boerne, Texas – Junior Izel Pieters led the Mississippi State Women's golf team for the second day in a row at the Jim West Challenge.

Wood In Top 20 after 36 holes at Jerry Pate Intercollegiate

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 9:00pm
BIRMINGHAM – Returning as the defending Jerry Pate Intercollegiate champion, senior Ben Wood is tied for 18th heading into Tuesday's final round at Old Overton Club.

Sexton Tosses Four Shutout Innings Monday

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 8:32pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. - Junior Austin Sexton was dominant in four shutout innings Monday afternoon, leading Gray to a 6-5 win against Maroon in Mississippi State's 11th scrimmage of the fall.

High Energy Dominates Day 1 Of Practice

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 6:43pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Basketball is now back.

Bulldogs Add Another TV Date On Eve Of First Official Practice

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 6:42pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – On the eve of the first official practice of the 2015-16 season, the Mississippi State women's basketball team learned the Longhorn Network will televise its Dec. 2 game at Texas.

University Press of Mississippi visiting campus for dissertation workshop

MSU News - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 6:27pm

The editors and marketing staff of the University Press of Mississippi will present “How to Revise a Dissertation and Turn It Into a Good Book” on Oct. 22 at 11 a.m. in Mitchell Memorial Library's Grisham Room. The hour-long presentation will be a discussion with time for Q&A. Topics covered will include:

* How publishing has changed, and why a book should be different from a dissertation

* The specific ways in which a successful book is different from a dissertation

* Recognizing and banishing “dissertationese”

* The importance of defining and writing for a specific audience

* What to do when you get stuck

* Researching publishers and crafting a successful proposal

Organizers expect the session to benefit both Mississippi State graduate students and faculty working toward tenure. They will also offer individual appointments starting at noon that day for anyone who would like to discuss their personal project in further detail. Attendees will also be eligible to win a special door prize: a free copy of William Germano’s seminal book, "From Dissertation to Book, Second Edition."

For additional information, contact Leila Salisbury at

Mississippi State University plans brand launch

MSU News - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 6:05pm

Mississippi State officials are planning the launch next week of an innovative branding initiative aimed at positioning the university for the future. Special festivities are planned for 3 p.m. on Tuesday [Oct. 13] at 3 p.m. in Lee Hall’s Bettersworth Auditorium.

The invitation-only celebration reflects months of work designed to create a platform that inspires better storytelling and a strong system to tell those stories in compelling and consistent ways throughout the university and beyond.

Joining MSU President Mark E. Keenum in presenting the comprehensive strategy will be five distinguished university alumni, including Camille Scales Young, vice president for Cornerstone Government Affairs; Bryan Wilson, managing partner for Tacoma Ag, LLC; Haley Fisackerly, president and CEO for Entergy Mississippi, Inc.; Kevin Robinson, chief meteorologist for WLWT Cincinnati; and Leslie Henderson, co-founder and general manager for Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company.

MSU’s Lee To Open As No. 1 Seed In Qualifying At Riviera/ITA

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 5:13pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – After competing in the Oracle/ITA Masters last week in Malibu, Mississippi State women's tennis player Jasmine Lee travels back to California to participate in the Riviera/ITA All-American Championship this week at the Riviera Tennis Club in Pacific Palisades.

MSU panel discussion to focus on future of news media

MSU News - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 3:39pm

Contact: Zack Plair

STARKVILLE, Miss.—A group of local and statewide journalists will share their perspectives on the evolving role of news media in society during a Wednesday [Oct. 7] program at Mississippi State.

Open to all, the 3:30-4:45 p.m. panel discussion takes place in the third-floor Fowlkes Auditorium of the Colvard Student Union.

Sponsored by the university’s communication department, the discussion coincides with the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication’s second News Engagement Day initiative.

AEJMC is a nonprofit organization based in Columbia, South Carolina, that supports the work of journalism and mass communication educators and students, as well as media professionals. It launched the News Engagement Day initiative last year.

Associate communication professor Kevin D. Williams said this is MSU’s first observance of the initiative designed to engage members of campus and local communities by challenging them to “Remember why news matters.”

Members of the MSU panel will include print reporters Therese Apel of the Clarion-Ledger and Carl Smith of the Starkville Dispatch; and television broadcasters Joey Barnes of WCBI Columbus and Ryan Moore with WDAM in Hattiesburg. Others may be added to the list, Williams said.

“We know that trends are changing in journalism,” the University of Georgia doctoral graduate observed. The panelists will be examining “how media outlets like print and broadcast are adapting to those changes,” he explained.

Williams, who joined the MSU faculty in 2005, said today’s prevalent trends involve the rise of social media and corresponding shrinkage of traditional news cycles resulting from an almost instantaneous consumer expectation.

Rather than specifically seeking stories carried in traditional media outlets, Williams said increasing numbers of young adults now are routed to news accounts via Facebook, Twitter and other third-party sources. The rise of citizen journalism also affects how news is covered, he said.

Williams said Apel made extensive use of social media while covering September’s Delta State University shooting of one campus faculty member by another. She will address both benefits and challenges faced at the scene that garnered substantial social-media involvement.

“When a big event happens, everyone with a cell phone becomes a journalist,” Williams said. “How does that help or hurt the situation?”

MSU Junior Becca L. Hawkins of Laurel said she looks forward to having the working professionals discuss their processes for gathering and reporting news. As a frequent news consumer who relies heavily on Twitter, the communication/communication studies major also is interested in hearing how the panelists expect to improve her future news reading experiences.

“We live in such a fast-paced world, and getting the consumer more news faster is always something that can be improved upon,” Hawkins said.

For more on News Engagement Day, visit Additional support for the campaign may be provided at @newsengagement and via hashtag #newsengagementday.

Additional information on the Wednesday program is available from Williams at 662-325-8330 and

MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at

Mullen Previews Troy Game; Oct. 17 Homecoming Time Set For 11 a.m.

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 3:30pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Mississippi State head coach Dan Mullen previewed the Bulldogs' upcoming home contest against Troy at MSU's weekly press conference on Monday.

Planned power outage affecting frat houses, Tri-Delta house extended

MSU News - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 11:32am

A planned power outage to facilitate construction activities at the Delta Delta Delta sorority house at Mississippi State has been extended by the contractor. During the outage beginning at 7 a.m. on Tuesday [Oct. 6], the Tri-Delta house, as well as the Farmhouse Fraternity house, Phi Delta Theta house and Delta Chi house, will be without power.

Services set for longtime engineering professor Jimmy Gassaway

MSU News - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 11:30am

Longtime Mississippi State engineering professor James David "Jimmy" Gassaway, 83, of Starkville died at home on Oct. 3.

Services will be held Tuesday [Oct. 6] at 11 a.m. at Welch Funeral Home in Starkville with visitation on Monday [Oct. 5] from 5-7 p.m. and one hour prior to the funeral on Tuesday.

Gassaway taught graduate level engineering courses at Purdue University, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa and University of Alabama at Birmingham. In 1967, he became a part of the Mississippi State University family, and taught electrical engineering graduate level courses until his retirement in 1997.

Help Fund Your Favorite School Cause One Apple at a Time

Lifestyles - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 11:27am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - While an apple a day may keep the doctor away, it turns out that this delectable fruit can help students, too.

This month you can aid specific school causes across the nation by taking a bite out of your favorite apple with "Buy an Apple, Help a Student," a fundraising program supported by the U.S. apple industry and other sponsors.

The way it works is this:

Between now and Nov. 15, the U.S. Apple Association, through its Apples for Education program, will feature 12 student causes on The classroom projects in need of funding range from new school gardens and improved libraries to updated technology, revitalized playgrounds and enhanced resources for teachers. To support one of these causes, all you have to do is follow these four simple steps:

* Snack. Grab anything apple-related, such as a piece of fruit, juice, applesauce, or any product from one of the program partners, like Marzetti dips and dressings, KIND Snacks, Roth cheese, or Johnsonville sausage.

* Snap. Take a picture of yourself or others enjoying the snack.

* Tag. Find a school cause that you would like to support at, tag your photo with the project's name and use the hashtag #Apples4Ed.

* Share. Vote for your favorite school cause by uploading the photo to or sharing on Instagram. You can vote as often as you like by uploading photos of yourself or others enjoying apples and apple pairings.

For every vote, the U.S. Apple Association and its program partners will pledge financial assistance to nominated projects to help them reach their goals. In addition, participants are eligible to win gift cards and have money donated directly to their selected projects.

In December, USApple will announce the cause with the most votes, which will receive the highest donation. All schools will receive a portion of funding for their respective project.

"We love the time-honored connection between apples and education and wanted to bring it to life with a fun program that lets people turn their daily apples into direct support for important classroom projects nationwide," said Wendy Brannen, USApple director of consumer health and public relations. "With Buy an Apple, Help a Student, enjoying an apple or delicious pairing from our program partners can go a long way in supporting healthy bodies and minds."

For more information, visit

New TIPS Program Focuses on Preventing Youth Sports Injuries

Lifestyles - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 11:25am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - It's recognized as a "silent epidemic" among our nation's youth.

We're talking sports-related injuries. Every day nearly 8,000 young athletes sustain an injury bad enough to send them to an emergency room, and -- if that's not chilling enough -- just look at these numbers from the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

* In the past year alone, 48 youths died due to sports injuries.

* About 30,000 high school athletes are hospitalized every year.

* Concussions account for 90 percent of high schoolers' 300,000 annual head injuries.

That explains why a new program called "Athletic TIPS" (Towards Injury Prevention in Sports) has garnered the support of everyone from health care professionals to athletic directors to sports stars like football legend Michael Strahan. The retired New York Giants defensive end, in fact, narrates the introductory video on behalf of the not-for-profit group behind the initiative.

The program's goal? To foster "a safer experience" for athletes at the kindergarten through college levels by focusing on the recognition, prevention and management of sports-related injuries -- all done through community workshops, online learning, and other grassroots initiatives.

"Athletic TIPS answers a critical need for educating school-age athletes, their parents, and advisors about sports-related injuries," says Ed Goren, the former vice-chairman of Fox Sports Media Group, who's backing the initiative. "Hopefully, parents will feel more confident encouraging their sons and daughters to reap sports' substantial benefits and life lessons."

The workshops target four key areas: concussion recognition and prevention; nutrition in sports management; preventing dehydration and heat-related conditions; and recognizing, managing, and preventing musculoskeletal injuries.

To learn more or schedule an Athletic TIPS Community Workshop in your area, visit

Don't Let Spooky Pests Haunt Your Home This Fall

Lifestyles - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 11:22am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - With Halloween and cooler weather right around the corner, sightings of creepy creatures indoors are sure to be on the rise as they search for cozy places to hole up for the winter. Rats, bats and spiders are the stuff nightmares are made of, and for good reason; these creepy critters are capable of spreading disease, and incurring serious harm to people, and even causing property damage.

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) offers the following guide on three common, creepy fall invaders, along with a few tips for preventing your home from turning into a true haunted house!


These primarily nocturnal pests are known to gnaw through almost anything to obtain food or water, including plastic or lead pipes. Rats are able to fit through an opening the size of a quarter, and once inside they are capable of spreading diseases such as plague, jaundice, rat-bite fever, trichinosis and salmonellosis.

Tip: Before bringing decorations out of storage and into the home, inspect all boxes for signs of infestation such as gnaw marks and rodent droppings. When it's time to put away decorations, store them in a plastic, sealed box to keep rodents out.


Bats are frequently associated with vampires and haunted houses, causing an unfounded fear in many people. However, it is important to note that bats are common carriers of rabies, a disease that can be fatal in humans, and their droppings can lead to histoplasmosis, a lung disease.

Tip: Screen attic vents and openings to chimneys, and install door sweeps this fall to keep bats out of the home. If an active bat infestation is suspected, it is important to contact a licensed pest control professional because bats are protected by law in most states.


While most spiders that invade homes are simply an annoyance, albeit a creepy one, the brown recluse and black widow spiders will bite when threatened and can cause painful -- possibly fatal -- reactions. Prompt medical attention is required if you've come into contact with one of these venomous spiders.

Tip: Avoid coming in to contact with spiders by keeping garages, attics and basements clean and clutter-free. Be sure to wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been in storage, such as Halloween decorations.

For more information on preventing pests this fall, please visit

Weight Loss Procedure Hits a Nerve -- Literally

Lifestyles - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 11:19am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - If you are one of the millions of Americans that have a body mass index (BMI) of 35 to 45, you may have thought about bariatric surgery to lose weight. The problem is that while it works, it's invasive and there can be significant long-term side effects. So much so that only a fraction of those who are obese consider a surgical option.

Now, however, the future of weight loss may just lie in a first-of-its-kind, pacemaker-like device that reduces hunger and leads to prolonged fullness without altering or restricting the anatomy. The way it works is this: the vagus nerve is the communicator between the brain and the stomach. If interrupted, the stomach tells the brain it's full sooner. Thus, patients eat less and feel full, allowing for safe, sustained weight loss.

Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in January 2015, it was the first weight-loss device to be available to patients in over a decade.

"Obesity is a global epidemic with consequences to both public and personal health," said Sajani Shah, MD, and Bariatric Surgeon, Tufts Medical Center. "From diet and exercise to bypass surgery, existing treatment options have failed to stop the advance of this disease."

Created by St. Paul-based EnteroMedics, vBloc Neurometabolic Therapy is implanted in a minimally invasive outpatient procedure and allows patients to eat a normal, healthy diet without food restrictions.

"With this new weight-loss option, what's really important to understand is that it's less invasive, less complex and there are absolutely no restrictions to what you can eat," said Shah. "Patients like that it's reversible, they have more control over their hunger and they have more control over how fast they lose weight. They are able to go back to work within days, and it's outpatient surgery," she said.

For Erica Roy, who received her vBloc device over 18 months ago, the results speak for themselves. Down 45 pounds, Roy said she couldn't be happier.

"What is amazing to me about this device is that it doesn't just affect me physically, it works on helping me address my relationship with food," she said.

Roy said the device caters to that group of people who feel gastric surgeries like lap band or bypass are too extreme.

For more information, please call 1-800-MyvBloc or visit

Could The Movie Studio be the Next Heavy Hitter?

Lifestyles - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 10:52am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Gordon Scott Venters thrives on challenges. As CEO of The Movie Studio (TMS) in Hollywood -- that's Florida, not Los Angeles -- he's been in the entertainment industry for more than 20 years.

Venters' resume reads like a who's who of Hollywood (California), where he was president and CEO of Destination Television, now TMS. While Venters has a soft spot for the West Coast, he is betting that, like California, South Florida will become the premier destination to produce movies.

"The energy is completely different here than in LA, and making movies in Florida has some terrific advantages," said Venters. "The visual landscape is stunning from a cinematic standpoint, there are diversified places to shoot and great visual optics. That's the value proposition in Florida."

It also doesn't hurt that the rich and famous work and play in the Sunshine State.

As a publicly traded micro-cap company, according to Venters, he knows that, although risky, there are huge growth opportunities for TMS (OTC: MVES).

"We want to give our followers, shareholders and supporters the chance to be a part of what we see as one of the newest hot studios providing full services in distribution, creativity and complete production," Venters said.

Currently, TMS has acquired a 60 percent membership interest in the Seven Arts Entertainment film library(SAFELA), giving TMS 14 titles including, "Drunkboat" with John Malkovich and John Goodman, "Night Of The Demons" with Shannon Elizabeth, "Fractured," "Knife Edge," "Shooting Gallery" with Freddie Prinze, Jr, "Nine Miles Down," "Noise," "The Pool Boys" with Matthew Lilliard, "A Broken Life" with Ving Rhames, "Autopsy," "Deal" with Burt Reynolds and Shannon Elizabeth, "Boo," "Back In The Day" with Ving Rhames and Ja Rule, and "Cemetery Gates."

Venters says he plans to bundle these with indie movies that the studio has produced, such as "Exposure" -- released on Netflix DVD and Amazon, and in Wal-Mart, Best Buy and Target.

Other movies in the pipeline for TMS are "Bad Actress" and "Double Exposure." The Movie Studio completed principal photography in Colombia, South America, for its film "Bad Actress," starring Sean Stone, son of the iconic Hollywood director Oliver Stone, and The Movie Studio's sensational Latina bombshell, Excelina from Colombia.

TMS has also completed its reverse stock split (OTC- MVES) finalizing the company's corporate restructuring while tightening the float and outstanding shares.

The Movie Studio Inc. is also involved with music videos, television shows and other intellectual properties. To learn more, visit

Can Insurance Companies Adapt to Today's Fast-Paced Lifestyle?

Lifestyles - Mon, 10/05/2015 - 10:50am
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - There is no doubt that life today moves fast. The rise of digital technologies has given people the ability to talk on the phone, watch their children's soccer games and send work emails all at once. Consumers have come to expect these same conveniences afforded by the Internet age from all the businesses and services they use -- except, oftentimes, from their insurance companies. Health insurance companies process 98 percent of claims within 30 days; but for today's fast-paced lifestyle, 30 days can feel like a lifetime, especially for those struggling to pay medical expenses.

With almost two-thirds of American households earning less money today than they did in 2002, just being insured is no longer enough. What's really important is how fast and hassle-free your insurance carrier can process and pay claims because the speed of claims payment can be vital to both physical and financial recovery.

According to a recent survey, 66 percent of workers would not be able to adjust to the large financial costs associated with a serious injury or illness, and 49 percent have less than $1,000 available to pay out-of-pocket medical expenses. Not to mention, due to rising health care costs, employers are implementing several cost-saving measures that are putting even more financial pressure on workers, such as:

* Increasing employees' health care insurance copayments.

* Increasing employees' share of premium.

* Implementing high-deductible health plans with health savings accounts.

This means waiting up to a month for an insurance payment may not be an option for many people. However, with improved technology and an understanding of today's consumers' needs, some insurance companies have been working hard to implement fast service to customers. For example, Aflac provides policies whose claims are regularly processed, approved and paid in just one day -- a speed that's almost unheard of in the insurance industry.

In the past, an insurance provider that paid claims fast was a luxury, but today it is a necessity. It has never been more important to have money in hand quickly when dealing with a serious illness or injury, so make sure your insurance company can move at your fast-paced speed.

To learn more about Aflac's One Day Pay promise, visit

Braun Advances To Round of 32 at ITA All-American Championships

Bulldog Beat - Sun, 10/04/2015 - 10:00pm
TULSA, Okla. – In his first tournament as a Bulldog, Mississippi State freshman Niclas Braun dispatched two opponents in quick order to continue his impressive run at the ITA All-American Championships as he moved on to the round of 32.

Moberly, Pieters Help Pace The Bulldogs In Texas

Bulldog Beat - Sun, 10/04/2015 - 9:00pm
Boerne, Texas – Playing the front nine holes exceptionally well on Sunday, Elsa Moberly and Izel Pieters paced Mississippi State in the opening round of the Jim West Challenge.
The Borger cross country teams competed at the Rebel Run in Amarill this past Saturday. See full...
The Borger Bulldogs football team had a tough night at Bulldog Stadium losing to Perryton 44-19....
The 2015 West Texas Comanche football team.


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