Skip to main content

Twisted Rodeo

Irwin ready for business in Vegas

Twisted Rodeo - Sun, 11/23/2014 - 6:47pm

ROBERTSDALE, Ala. – Each time steer wrestler Kyle Irwin looks down the lane at a bowling alley, he sees 10 pens lined up in the shape of a triangle.

The main purpose, as always, is to knock down all the pens. In order to make it happen, though, Irwin’s focus is on one individual sliver of waxed wood. If he hits that mark just right, he knows a strike is likely.

That’s the same philosophy Irwin is using a she approaches his first qualification to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, the sport’s premier championship set for Dec. 4-13 in Las Vegas.

“My goal at the NFR is to make money, not necessarily win the world title,” said Irwin, 24, of Robertsdale. “If I make the money, I’ll win the world. My job is to not mess up. Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast.

Kyle Irwin

Kyle Irwin

“All I can do is go as fast as I can with the steer I have each night. It’s important that I don’t leave any money on the table. If the cards weren’t in there to win the average or the world, that’s fine, but I want to have maxed out on every steer I have.”

That’s a solid outlook for the young cowboy, who will wrap up the best season of his career over 10 December nights in the City of Lights. In 2014, Irwin earned $59,736, finishing the regular season 10th in the world standings. Only the top 15 contestants in each event earn the opportunity to compete for the biggest pay in the sport in Las Vegas.

“Going to the NFR is something that every guy in my position, every kid that’s 11 years old, dreams about,” he said. “I’m very grateful and very proud to be going.”

Irwin’s NFR marks the first time in eight years that an Alabaman has qualified. The last was heeler Cole Bigbee. Before that, bull rider Tyler Fowler qualified in 2000 and ’01, while steer wrestler Victor Deck qualified in 1996-97. As the state’s only representative in Las Vegas, he will carry the flag each night during the NFR’s opening ceremonies.

“That flag’s going to have some dust on it; it’s hasn’t been used since 2006,” Irwin said. “I hope they’ll play ‘Sweet Home Alabama’ every night I back in the box. It’s so cool getting to represent the state.”

He also is representing his family, from his dad, Ken Irwin, to his mom, Ruthie Campbell, to four sisters, Karissa, Brittany, Laney and Raylen. He also carries a flag for a number of top-notch steer-wrestling cousins and dear friends, all of whom who have been beneficial in Kyle Irwin’s bulldogging career.

“My immediate family grew up farming, working cattle, cowboying,” he said. “The atmosphere was there for me. I played sports from elementary school … baseball and football every year. When I was 11 years old, I started chute-dogging and junior rodeoing.”

Chute-dogging is the precursor to steer wrestling. Instead of jumping off a sprinting horse onto a running steer, chute-doggers get ahold of the steer right out of the timed-event chute. It allows them to learn the proper techniques.

“When I was 13, an eighth-grader, I was getting ready to start jumping steers in high school rodeo,” he said. “My cousin, Bo Campbell, owns a rodeo company and is a big-time bulldogging fanatic. He keeps Mexican cattle in his pasture.

“My cousins had me running steers all day every day. I roped calves and team roped, too, but we made sure we bulldogged first.”

As he progressed, the young cowboy had a distinct focus, which carried him to scholarship opportunities – first at Western Oklahoma College in Altus, then to Northwestern Oklahoma State University in Alva.

“The competition and watching my buddies and my older cousins drive and succeed kept the passion there,” Irwin said. “Then I realized my talent with it. It was all a goal and a dream. I knew they bulldogged in Oklahoma, so that’s where I went. I knew I wanted to go to Oklahoma. I wouldn’t have had the opportunity in Alabama that I did in Oklahoma.”

He did pretty well, too. In high school, he won the Alabama High School Rodeo Association twice and was the runner-up once. Irwin was a four-time qualifier to the College National Finals Rodeo, finishing as the reserve champion in 2011. In fact, his stay in Oklahoma became an amazing starting point to his pro career.

Each of the past two seasons, he has finished as the reserve year-end champion in the Prairie Circuit – both times, as it worked out, he finished just behind Stockton Graves, Irwin’s coach at Northwestern. In 2014, Irwin won the average title at the Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo, securing his second straight qualification to the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo, where he will defend his national title.

“All year, I’ve said the key to my season was winning the Ram National Circuit Finals,” he said of the April victory. “I wasn’t going to rodeo unless I did very well there. It unfolded perfectly, winning $10,000 cash and a voucher for a Ram truck.

“It gave me the confidence I needed. I really believed in what I was doing this time. The maturity I gained from the last two years of rodeoing helped me tremendously, and it all worked out this year.”

When he arrives in Las Vegas, Irwin will enlist the help of fellow bulldogger Tyler Pearson, a 2013 NFR qualifier from Louisville, Miss. Pearson will serve as Irwin’s hazer, while Irwin also will ride Pearson’s great horse, Sketch.

“I don’t have any worries as far as horsepower or hazing,” said Irwin, who has sponsorship support from Cinch, Black and Blue Quarter Horses and Southwest Trailers. “When I back in there every night, all I will have to worry about is Kyle; that’s enough.”

That’s taking care of business. Irwin knows, just as in bowling, he needs to keep his focus on the things closest to him. If he does that, the big prize will be waiting for him soon enough.

“In my career, I’d like to win the world, and I’d like to win the average at the finals,” he said. “I’d like to make my family’s life a little bit easier. I’d like to set myself up that when I’m done, I can look back one day and say, ‘My rodeoing gave me this.’ ”

Irwin is well on his way.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

New Mexicans on the national stage

Twisted Rodeo - Sun, 11/23/2014 - 5:09pm

LAS VEGAS – Between them, Clint Cooper, Jim Ross Cooper and Taos Muncy make up 17 qualifications to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and two world championships.

They also serve as a great reminder of the outstanding talent that was raised on rodeo in New Mexico. Not only are they some of the best homegrown cowboys New Mexico has to offer, they’re three of the greatest cowboys in the game and all are “Riding for the Brand” for the Tate Branch Auto Group.

ClintCooper“Tate Branch has been huge for me in my rodeo career,” said Clint Cooper, a tie-down roper raised in Lovington. “This is how I make a living, and he supports me so much. Our relationship is great. What he gives back, not only to the community there in Lea County, but to the sport of rodeo and to the high school kids is just incredible.

“I’m just amazed at how much Tate Branch does for the community and for rodeo.”

The Tate Branch Auto Group has dealerships in the southeastern New Mexico communities of Artesia, Carlsbad and Hobbs, the latter of which is in Lea County, the home turf for both Coopers. While Clint grew up in Lovington, Jim Ross was born and raised near Monument.

Jim Ross Cooper

Jim Ross Cooper

Both come from a storied rodeo family: Clint is the son of Roy Cooper, an eight time world champion and ProRodeo Hall of Famer; Jim Ross is the son of Jimmie Cooper, a three-time titlist and hall-of-fame inductee. The Cooper clan has exceptional New Mexico rodeo roots.

“New Mexico is where I grew up,” said Clint Cooper, a five-time NFR qualifier now living in Decatur, Texas. “That’s where I learned to rope with my dad and my grandpa, Tuffy. Being part of New Mexico with Tate Branch means everything to me. Lea County is my roots.”

Those are the roots for Jim Ross Cooper, a five-time NFR qualifier as a header. He earned his first trip to the NFR in 2007 with his twin brother, Jake. He has since returned with heelers Brandon Beers (2011, 2013 and 2014) and Charly Crawford (2012).

Jim Ross Cooper and Beers go to Las Vegas ranked seventh in the world standings; it’s the highest ranking prior to the NFR in their history together.

Taos Muncy

Taos Muncy

Clint Cooper finished the regular season 10th in the world standings, while Muncy, a two-time world champion from Corona, N.M., is the No. 1 saddle bronc rider in the game. He owns gold buckles he earned in 2007 and 2011.

“It’s hard to believe this is my seventh time,” said Muncy, who, in the first year he won the world title, became just the third cowboy in the history of the game to have won the college title and the gold buckle in the same event the same calendar year; Muncy, as a sophomore at Oklahoma Panhandle State University, won the bronc riding title at the College National Finals Rodeo that June.

“It seems like I was just going to the first one the other day. I love what I get to do. It doesn’t matter how many times you get to go, it’s always special going to the NFR.”

It also is special that Muncy carries the New Mexico flag into the Thomas & Mack Center during the grand opening.

“It’s a real big deal that I get to represent New Mexico,” he said. “I get to see all parts of the world getting to rodeo, but I’m always thankful to come back here to home.”

That home includes a touch of Tate Branch Auto Group.

“I was real fortunate to meet Tate and his wife,” Muncy said. “They show their support year round. We really haven’t had that in New Mexico in the last few years. I’m glad they’re recognizing the sport of rodeo.”

Tate Branch-logo

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Laughlin primed, ready for the NFR

Twisted Rodeo - Sun, 11/23/2014 - 3:53pm

PUEBLO, Colo. – As her season progressed, Christine Laughlin noticed a distinct pattern in reference to her goals.

“When I got started this year, I just wanted to make the finals,” said Laughlin, a barrel racer from Pueblo. “Then when I got into the top 10, I wanted to stay in the top 10. My goals kept going up as the year went along.”

Next week she will set forth on a new path in her career, chasing the ProRodeo world championship during the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, the sport’s premier event that takes place Dec. 4-13 in Las Vegas. Through the 2014 season, Laughlin earned more than $93,000 and will begin the 10-round finale No. 8 in the world standings.

Christine Laughlin

Christine Laughlin

Once she arrives in the Nevada desert, she will race her talented horse, Guys Six Pack To Go, around the cloverleaf pattern while chasing the biggest pay in the game. Each night, contestants will battle for the $19,000 payday that comes with winning a go-round. She’ll have 10 opportunities for that.

“I’m excited and really looking forward to it,” she said.

She should. She has something special in Six Pack, a 9-year-old dapple gray gelding owned by Kathleen Collier of Hereford, Texas. Now Laughlin and Six Pack will run on ProRodeo’s biggest stage while part of an elite field of the best barrel racing tandems in the game.

“I’ve had him for two and a half years,” she said of the gelding. The first year was kind of tough getting him to where he is now. He liked to hit barrels. He was fast and smart, and he just hit barrels.

“I hit a lot of barrels that first year, but we just kept working at it.”

The work has paid off very well in 2014. She started the campaign off well, earning good money in February at San Antonio. She followed that with six event titles: Reno, Nev.; Salinas, Calif.; Dodge City, Kan.; Castle Rock, Colo.; Kennewick, Wash.; and Ellensburg, Wash. It’s been a magical ride.

“San Antonio really got me started through the winter,” said Laughlin, who has sponsorship support from Arrow Electric, Top of Texas Inc., Professional Choice, Cactus Saddlry, Western Dove and Elite Equine Veterinary Services. “I won almost $10,000. That got me excited and got me going. I really had just a few checks the rest of the winter. In the springtime, I went out to California and won a little bit. Once I got to Reno (in June) and won Reno, everything started clicking.

“Six Pack starting becoming more consistent. We had two or three runs of beating the field by hundredths of a second.”

She and her talented horse will need to be consistent in Las Vegas, but she has a lot of faith in her partner. That comes from the work they’ve done together in and out of the arena, but it’s nothing new for Laughlin, who was just a toddler the first time she was horseback.

“My mom never really rode, but she was a rodeo mom the secretary,” she said. “My dad rode. He competed when we were little. He never went down the road; he always had a full time job out at the steel mill. We’ve always had horses and raised our horses.”

Laughlin was raised in southern Colorado, one of two daughters to Ron and Patty Laughlin. She and her sister, Tracy Paulsen, attended college on rodeo scholarships – Christine Laughlin was part of the rodeo program at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas. At each level of competition, she knew the support system she had at home.

“My family means a great deal to me,” she said. “If I didn’t have them, I don’t know how things would be going. I wouldn’t have my place. I live just 10 miles down the road from them. When I’m gone, they check on the place and take care of it for me.

“My dad shoes my horses for me when I get home. He did go with me through the winter, and when I’m by myself, he tries to go.”

That helps tremendously. Laughlin knows anyone competing in rodeo at a high level needs plenty of extra players on the team, whether they’re on the rodeo trail with her or tending to business at home.

“I don’t know what I’d do without my parents and my neighbors, Kevin and Christy Milder,” Laughlin said. “They take care of stuff for me when I’m gone, too.”

With business covered in Colorado, she will turn her attention to the City of Lights, where she hopes to parlay her first NFR qualification into a dream season. As her goals have evolved, she realizes she is within reach of that elusive world championship; in rodeo, where dollars equal points, the cowgirl with the most money won at the conclusion of the year earns the coveted gold buckle.

“I hope I end up with several of them,” Laughlin said. “I think Six Pack is as good as any of the horses that are going to be there. Winning the title is important. I think that’s what you work all year for. I’ve been running with them all year, so there’s no reason he can’t run with them there.”

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

UBHA calls its finale a success

Twisted Rodeo - Wed, 11/19/2014 - 12:09pm

RAPID CITY, S.D. – Two words adequately describe the inaugural season of the United Bucking Horse Association: Resounding success.

The organization concluded its first campaign with the UBHA World Finals, which took place Nov. 14 in Rapid City. Fifty of the top young bucking horses in North American qualified for the championship in two age divisions: 2- and 3-year-olds. It was the perfect way to wrap up an amazing year.

UBHA-logo1“I think our world finals went better than we ever could have imagined,” said Guy French, the UBHA’s executive director. “The growth and exposure we’ve been able to get is incredible.”

So was the competition. Three horses earned 91-point markings, the top scores in the finale: French’s Wazzup and Jim Lawrence’s bay mare each claimed the prize in the 3-year-old division, while Joe Waln’s sorrel gelding won the 2-year-old class. The young animals are bucked under a mechanical dummy instead of a rider to allow the horses the opportunity to develop with age.

“That mare is out of one of our top producing mares we use in bareback, Up In Smoke,” said Lawrence, a stock contractor from Kennedy, Saskatchewan. “It’s a real honor to be able to compete at a North American level and come out on top.”

Lawrence has made a living raising bucking horses. He loves the idea of the UBHA.

“For someone like me who’s already in the business, we can take some of the younger stock that we’re raising anyway and establish them a little sooner in their lives,” he said. “By the time they get into the full rodeo circle, they’ve already built a name and reputation.”

French has been touting Wazzup all season. He knew there was something special in the colt, and the proof has come through the season.

“He’s been an awesome colt, and I’ve never seen one like him,” French said. He just loves to buck. I’m proud to own him. The future that he’s going to have is just unbelievable. Hopefully he’ll go onto the big leagues and be a big name in the PRCA.”

That also may be the future for Waln’s gelding, who is carrying on a family tradition as a stock contractor whose ranch is near Martin, S.D.

“This means the world to us,” Waln said. “It’s a great promotional tool, something you can hang your hat on as a horse man and a horse breeder.

“The UBHA is an outlet to buck these horses earlier on and see what I had. This is a great opportunity to do that and promote these horses.”

That’s why so many horse owners are excited about the future of the organization. They see great potential, not only with their own young horses but also with the opportunity to develop the next great line of rodeo bucking animals.

United Bucking Horse Association World Finals
Nov. 14, 2014
3-year-old class
: (horse, owner, score) 1. (tie) Wazzup, Guy French, and bay mare, Jim Lawrence, 91 points; 3. Snow Bear, Ron Solomon, 84.5; 4. Black mare, Lance Lesmeister, 84; 5. Surprise, MX Bar Ranch, 81; 6. Betty Boop, Kenny Andrews, 80.5; 7. Unnamed, Hat Brand, 80; 8. (tie) Clyde, Steve Stone, Hallelujah, Skip and Elaine Jones, and Shadow, Justin Twogood, 78.5.

2-year-old class: 1. BF SOB, Joe Waln, 91 points; 2. Martin, Ken RealBird, 86.5; 3. Oscar, Wes Janis, 81; 4. 4. Xotic Lady, Guy French, 80.5; 5. Dream Girl, Joe Waln, 78; 6. Brown mare, Ron Solomon, 77; 7. Buckskin filly, Darcy Hollingsworth, 76; 8. (tie) Black filly, Jim Lawrence, and Jasmine, Ken RealBird, 74.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Together again

Twisted Rodeo - Mon, 11/10/2014 - 5:39pm
Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith announced their return to a team roping partnership Monday through a video from Spin to Win Magazine. You can watch the announcement, along with the word about an upcoming video, by clicking HERE. (SCREEN CAPTURE FROM SPIN TO WIN MAGAZINE'S VIDEO POST)

Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith announced their return to a team roping partnership Monday through a video from Spin to Win Magazine. You can watch the announcement, along with the word about an upcoming video, by clicking HERE. (SCREEN CAPTURE FROM SPIN TO WIN MAGAZINE’S VIDEO POST)

With the help of Spin to Win Magazine, Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith on Monday announced they will resume their partnership for the 2015 season.

The cowboys won the team roping world titles together in 2010; it is Brazile’s only team roping gold buckle in a storied career. Smith also won the heeling world championship with then-partner Clay Tryan.

The duo roped together for seven years, then split for 2014. Both return to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in a few weeks with their 2014 partners: Brazile with heeler Travis Graves and Smith with header Kaleb Driggers.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

A record-breaking performance … again

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 11:50pm
Trevor Brazile ropes on the final night of the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping. He won the average and the world standings, pocketing $43,858 in NFSR money to finish the season with $112,692. That is a PRCA record for single year earnings in steer roping. His 114.1-second cumulative time on 10 runs also set a record, bettering the mark set by Rocky Patterson in 2001. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Trevor Brazile ropes on the final night of the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping. He won the average and the world standings, pocketing $43,858 in NFSR money to finish the season with $112,692. That is a PRCA record for single year earnings in steer roping. His 114.1-second cumulative time on 10 runs also set a record, bettering the mark set by Rocky Patterson in 2001. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping
Kansas Star Arena Arena
Nov. 7-8, 2014

First round: 1. Trevor Brazile, 9.8 seconds, $5,331; 2. Vin Fisher Jr., 10.0, $4,281; 3. Jason Evans, 10.2, $3,231; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.0, $2,181; 5. Scott Snedecor, 11.1, $1,131.

Second round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 9.1 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 9.9, $4,281; 3. J.P. Wickett, 10.3, $3,231; 4. Tony Reina, 10.6, $2,181; 5. Jason Evans, 11.3, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 19.7 seconds on two runs; 2. Scott Snedecor, 20.2; 3. Jason Evans, 21.5; 4. Mike Chase, 22.9; 5. J.P. Wickett, 23.1.

Third round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 11.0 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 11.5, $4,281; 3. Vin Fisher Jr., 11.6, $3,231; 4. Brodie Poppino, 12.7, $2,181; 5. Jess Tierney, 13.4, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. (tie) Trevor Brazile and Scott Snedecor, 31.2 seconds on three runs; 3. Jess Tierney, 37.3; 4. Jason Evans, 37.5; 5. Troy Tillard, 38.6.

Fourth round: 1. Jason Evans, 9.5 seconds, $5,331; 2. (tie) Mike Chase and J.P. Wickett, 10.3, $3,756 each; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.1, $2,181; 5. Jess Tierney, 11.3, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.9 seconds on four runs; 2. Jason Evans, 47.0; 3. Jess Tierney, 48.6; 4. J.P. Wickett, 49.8; 5. Mike Chase, 51.5.

Fifth round: 1. Mike Chase, 10.2 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 10.3, $4,281; 3. Brodie Poppino, 10.7, $3,231; 4. (tie) J.P. Wickett and Troy Tillard, 10.8, $1,656 each. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 54.2 seconds on five runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 60.6; 3. Mike Chase, 61.7; 4. Jason Evans, 63.5; 5. Jess Tierney, 67.5.

Sixth round: 1. Brady Garten, 9.5 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 9.6, $4,281; 3. Troy Tillard, 10.1, $3,231; 4. J.P. Wickett, 10.7, $2,181; 5. Cody Lee, 10.8, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 63.8 seconds on six runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 71.3; 3. Mike Chase, 74.9; 4. Jason Evans, 77.0; 5. 78.3.

Seventh round: 1. Brady Garten, 9.5 seconds; 2. Trevor Brazile, 11.2, $4,281; 3. Tony Reina, 11.7, $3,231; 4. Jess Tierney, 12.5, $2,181; 5. J.P. Wickett, 14.4, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 75.0 seconds on seven runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 85.7; 3. Jason Evans, 97.3; 4. Tony Reina, 100.5; 5. Mike Chase, 74.9 seconds on six runs.

Eighth round: 1. Brady Garten, 9.8 seconds, $5,331; 2. Rocky Patterson, 10.8, $4,281; 3. Chance Kelton, 10.9, $3,231; 4. Cody Lee, 12.1, $2,181; 5. (tie) Mike Chase and Brodie Poppino, 12.4, $565 each. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 89.5 seconds on eight runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 99.4; 3. Tony Reina, 114.4; 4. Mike Chase, 87.3 seconds on seven runs; 5. Chance Kelton, 96.0.

Ninth round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 9.9 seconds, $5,331; 2. Jason Evans, 10.1, $4,281; 3. Cody Lee, 10.8, $3,231; 4. J.P. Wickett, 10.9, $2,181; 5. Chance Kelton, 11.3, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 103.6 seconds on nine runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 110.3; 3. Tony Reina, 133.9; 4. Chance Kelton, 107.3 seconds on nine runs; 5. Jason Evans, 107.4.

Tenth round: 1. Vin Fisher Jr., 9.6 seconds, $5,331; 2. Chet Herren, 9.7, $4,281; 3. Brady Garten, 9.9, $3,231; 4. Ricky Patterson, 10.2, $2,181; 5. Trevor Brazile, 10.5, $1,131. Average: 1. Trevor Brazile, 114.1 seconds on 10 runs, $15,992; 2. J.P. Wickett, 126.3, $12,842; 3. Chance Kelton, 120.4 seconds on nine runs, $9,692; 4. Jason Evans, 121.3, $6,542; 5. Tony Reina, 133.9, $3,392.

Total NFSR money: 1. Trevor Brazile, $43,858; 2. $26,977; 3. Jason Evans, $20,515; 4. Brady Garten, $19,223; 5. Scott Snedecor, $17,123.

Final world standings: 1. Trevor Brazile, $112,692; 2. Chet Herren, $72,191; 3. J.P. Wickett, $60,017; 4. Jess Tierney, $58,003; 5. Vin Fisher Jr., $56,341; 6. Jason Evans, $55,739; 7. Cody Lee, $51,957; 8. Brady Garten, $41,766; 9. Chance Kelton, $51,517; 10. Scott Snedecor, $48,348; 11. Rocky Patterson, $43,152; 12. Mike Chase, $42,932; 13. Tony Reina, $41,969; 14. Brodie Poppino, $26,170; 15. Troy Tillard, $33,155.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-10th Round

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 11:25pm
Vin Fisher Jr.

Vin Fisher Jr.

Tenth round: 1. Vin Fisher Jr., 9.6 seconds, $5,331; 2. Chet Herren, 9.7, $4,281; 3. Brady Garten, 9.9, $3,231; 4. Ricky Patterson, 10.2, $2,181; 5. Trevor Brazile, 10.5, $1,131. Average: 1. Trevor Brazile, 114.1 seconds on 10 runs, $15,992; 2. J.P. Wickett, 126.3, $12,842; 3. Chance Kelton, 120.4 seconds on nine runs, $9,692; 4. Jason Evans, 121.3, $6,542; 5. Tony Reina, 133.9, $3,392.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Ninth Round

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 10:42pm
Scott Snedecor

Scott Snedecor

Ninth round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 9.9 seconds, $5,331; 2. Jason Evans, 10.1, $4,281; 3. Cody Lee, 10.8, $3,231; 4. J.P. Wickett, 10.9, $2,181; 5. Chance Kelton, 11.3, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 103.6 seconds on nine runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 110.3; 3. Tony Reina, 133.9; 4. Chance Kelton, 107.3 seconds on nine runs; 5. Jason Evans, 107.4.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Brazile clinches Gold Buckle No. 20

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 10:21pm
Trevor Brazile clinched his fifth steer roping and 20th world championship overall during the seventh go-round of the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping on Saturday night at the Kansas Star Arena. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Trevor Brazile clinched his fifth steer roping and 20th world championship overall during the seventh go-round of the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping on Saturday night at the Kansas Star Arena. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Eighth Round

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 10:15pm
Brady Garten

Brady Garten

Eighth round: 1. Brady Garten, 9.8 seconds, $5,331; 2. Rocky Patterson, 10.8, $4,281; 3. Chance Kelton, 10.9, $3,231; 4. Cody Lee, 12.1, $2,181; 5. (tie) Mike Chase and Brodie Poppino, 12.4, $565 each. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 89.5 seconds on eight runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 99.4; 3. Tony Reina, 114.4; 4. Mike Chase, 87.3 seconds on seven runs; 5. Chance Kelton, 96.0.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Seventh Round

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 9:46pm
Brady Garten

Brady Garten

Seventh round: 1. Brady Garten, 9.5 seconds; 2. Trevor Brazile, 11.2, $4,281; 3. Tony Reina, 11.7, $3,231; 4. Jess Tierney, 12.5, $2,181; 5. J.P. Wickett, 14.4, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 75.0 seconds on seven runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 85.7; 3. Jason Evans, 97.3; 4. Tony Reina, 100.5; 5. Mike Chase, 74.9 seconds on six runs.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Sixth Round

Twisted Rodeo - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 9:20pm
Brady Garten

Brady Garten

Sixth round: 1. Brady Garten, 9.5 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 9.6, $4,281; 3. Troy Tillard, 10.1, $3,231; 4. J.P. Wickett, 10.7, $2,181; 5. Cody Lee, 10.8, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 63.8 seconds on six runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 71.3; 3. Mike Chase, 74.9; 4. Jason Evans, 77.0; 5. 78.3.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Brazile leads the way at NFSR

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 11:56pm
Trevor Brazile leads both the average at the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping and the world standings through five go-rounds at the Kansas Star Arena. Brazile earned more than $18,000 on Friday night and has pushed his season earnings to $87,008. He leads the No. 2 man, Chet Herren, by more than $19,000 heading into Saturday night's second performance. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Trevor Brazile leads both the average at the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping and the world standings through five go-rounds at the Kansas Star Arena. Brazile earned more than $18,000 on Friday night and has pushed his season earnings to $87,008. He leads the No. 2 man, Chet Herren, by more than $19,000 heading into Saturday night’s second performance. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping
Kansas Star Arena Arena
Nov. 7-8, 2014

First round: 1. Trevor Brazile, 9.8 seconds, $5,331; 2. Vin Fisher Jr., 10.0, $4,281; 3. Jason Evans, 10.2, $3,231; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.0, $2,181; 5. Scott Snedecor, 11.1, $1,131.

Second round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 9.1 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 9.9, $4,281; 3. J.P. Wickett, 10.3, $3,231; 4. Tony Reina, 10.6; 5. Jason Evans, 11.3. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 19.7 seconds on two runs; 2. Scott Snedecor, 20.2; 3. Jason Evans, 21.5; 4. Mike Chase, 22.9; 5. J.P. Wickett, 23.1.

Third round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 11.0 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 11.5, $4,281; 3. Vin Fisher Jr., 11.6, $3,231; 4. Brodie Poppino, 12.7, $2,181; 5. Jess Tierney, 13.4, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. (tie) Trevor Brazile and Scott Snedecor, 31.2 seconds on three runs; 3. Jess Tierney, 37.3; 4. Jason Evans, 37.5; 5. Troy Tillard, 38.6.

Fourth round: 1. Jason Evans, 9.5 seconds, $5,331; 2. (tie) Mike Chase and J.P. Wickett, 10.3, $3,756 each; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.1, $2,181; 5. Jess Tierney, 11.3, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.9 seconds on four runs; 2. Jason Evans, 47.0; 3. Jess Tierney, 48.6; 4. J.P. Wickett, 49.8; 5. Mike Chase, 51.5.

Fifth round: 1. Mike Chase, 10.2 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 10.3, $4,281; 3. Brodie Poppino, 10.7, $3,231; 4. (tie) J.P. Wickett and Troy Tillard, 10.8, $1,656 each. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 54.2 seconds on five runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 60.6; 3. Mike Chase, 61.7; 4. Jason Evans, 63.5; 5. Jess Tierney, 67.5.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Round Five

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 11:06pm
Mike Chase

Mike Chase

Fifth round: 1. Mike Chase, 10.2 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 10.3, $4,281; 3. Brodie Poppino, 10.7, $3,231; 4. (tie) J.P. Wickett and Troy Tillard, 10.8, $1,656 each. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 54.2 seconds on five runs; 2. J.P. Wickett, 60.6; 3. Mike Chase, 61.7; 4. Jason Evans, 63.5; 5. Jess Tierney, 67.5.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Fourth Round

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 10:39pm
Jason Evans

Jason Evans

Fourth round: 1. Jason Evans, 9.5 seconds, $5,331; 2. (tie) Mike Chase and J.P. Wickett, 10.3, $3,756 each; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.1, $2,181; 5. Jess Tierney, 11.3, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.9 seconds on four runs; 2. Jason Evans, 47.0; 3. Jess Tierney, 48.6; 4. J.P. Wickett, 49.8; 5. Mike Chase, 51.5.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Third Round

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 10:14pm
Scott Snedecor

Scott Snedecor

Third round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 11.0 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 11.5, $4,281; 3. Vin Fisher Jr., 11.6, $3,231; 4. Brodie Poppino, 12.7, $2,181; 5. Jess Tierney, 13.4, $1,131. Average leaders: 1. (tie) Trevor Brazile and Scott Snedecor, 31.2 seconds on three runs; 3. Jess Tierney, 37.3; 4. Jason Evans, 37.5; 5. Troy Tillard, 38.6.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-Second Round

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 10:07pm
Scott Snedecor

Scott Snedecor

Second round: 1. Scott Snedecor, 9.1 seconds, $5,331; 2. Trevor Brazile, 9.9, $4,281; 3. J.P. Wickett, 10.3, $3,231; 4. Tony Reina, 10.6; 5. Jason Evans, 11.3. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 19.7 seconds on two runs; 2. Scott Snedecor, 20.2; 3. Jason Evans, 21.5; 4. Mike Chase, 22.9; 5. J.P. Wickett, 23.1.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

NFSR-First round

Twisted Rodeo - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 9:18pm
Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

First round: 1. Trevor Brazile, 9.8 seconds, $5,331; 2. Vin Fisher Jr., 10.0, $4,281; 3. Jason Evans, 10.2, $3,231; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.0, $2,181; 5. Scott Snedecor, 11.1, $1,131.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

UBHA a proving ground for horses

Twisted Rodeo - Wed, 11/05/2014 - 10:46am

RAPID CITY, S.D. – The greatest athletes in the world need a proving ground.

All major sports utilize the college ranks, where young players fine-tune their talents with hopes of developing into a long career. Baseball and golf have minor leagues, and basketball features a developmental league.

The United Bucking Horse Association is a system in place to help with the advancement of bucking horses for rodeo-related events. Now in its first year, the UBHA was created to showcase 2- and 3-year-old colts that were born to buck. The young horses perform with a mechanical dummy instead of a rider to allow the horses the opportunity to develop with age.

UBHA-logo1“It makes perfect sense to establish an association that would cater to the dummy classes and potentially provide proven foals as contenders,” said Guy French, the UBHA’s executive director.

Through the 2014 season, the organization conducted 11 contests across the United States and Canada that featured the young bucking horses. Now the top 25 in each age division have qualified for the UBHA World Finals, set for 5 p.m. (Mountain Standard Time) Friday, Nov. 14, at the Central States Fairgrounds in Rapid City.

“What I hear the most is people saying how much fun they’re having with is,” said Darcy Hollingsworth, a UBHA shareholder who raises bucking stock near Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. “There are still a lot of people that aren’t involved in it yet. I can see it growing to where we have regions, and I see a lot of people being up and building our finals into a really good deal.”

Hollingsworth has been around the game for many years. He rode broncs when he was younger and now enjoys watching these tremendous athletes.

“The UBHA competitions are just a fun thing to do,” he said. “There are a lot of good things coming.”

It starts with the world finals next week.

“Part of our concept is to keep this as an all-inclusive association where everyone is welcome to participate and everyone has an equal shot of winning,” French said. “We have several new people that had never raised bucking horses that have qualified for our finals. They have done well.

“The UBHA gives the small guy a chance to compete against the big guy and still have a chance at winning.”

The competition is an added flavor to the association. A key ingredient is serving as the minor league system for the young horses.

“I see this as being a proving ground for the future of the PRCA,” French said of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, the sport’s premier sanctioning body that produces the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo every December. “This allows us to showcase the animals and get them out there to perspective buyers at the next level.

“These are the top colts in the United States and Canada. They earned the spot to be there. This will be the best set of bucking colts that have ever been together in one place.”

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

Struxness, Kyle win NWOSU rodeo

Twisted Rodeo - Mon, 11/03/2014 - 4:10pm

ALVA, Okla. – J.D. Struxness transferred to Northwestern Oklahoma State University earlier this fall in order to better learn the art of steer wrestling.

“I wanted to come bulldog with Stockton and Kody,” Struxness said of Rangers coach Stockton Graves and assistant Kody Woodward. “I figured this would be a good place to get better.”

Northwestern rodeo coach Stockton Graves, right, presents Ranger J.D. Struxness with his trophy Yeti cooler for winning the steer wrestling title at the Northwestern Oklahoma State University rodeo. (NORTHWESTERN RODEO PHOTO)

Northwestern rodeo coach Stockton Graves, right, presents Ranger J.D. Struxness with his trophy Yeti cooler for winning the steer wrestling title at the Northwestern Oklahoma State University rodeo. (NORTHWESTERN RODEO PHOTO)

That theory is working quite well. This past weekend, Struxness won both rounds and the steer wrestling average at the NWOSU rodeo.

Struxness is from Milan, Minn., and attended his first year on the rodeo team at Missouri Valley College. Because of National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association transfer rules, he had to sit out for the first three events of the Central Plains Region season. The victory in Alva was a good way to start his Northwestern career.

“I drew good steers all weekend,” said Struxness, a sophomore who posted a 4.1-second run to win the opening round, then followed it with a 3.5 to win the short-round and the average.

He was one of eight Northwestern men in the championship round, where he was joined by steer wrestlers Brock White and Grayson Allred; tie-down ropers Hayden Pearce and Maverick Harper; the team roping tandem of Pearce and Wade Perry and header Dalton Richards; and bull rider Weston Wilson.

White, who posted a two-run cumulative time of 9.0 seconds, placed second in the short round and average. Pearce and Perry finished fourth in the team roping average, while Wilson finished sixth in bull riding.

Overall, the men’s team finished second. It was a solid performance at the Rangers’ hometown rodeo.

“This helped me a lot,” Struxness said. “The points helped, and it was nice to win the home rodeo and here in Alva.”

The women’s team, which finished third this past weekend, was paced by senior Karley Kile of Topeka, Kan. She won the breakaway roping championship – she finished third in the opening round with a 2.4-second run, then scored a 2.5 to win the short round and the average – and shared the first-round victory in goat tying with a 7.0-second run to earn a place in the short round.

Breakaway roper Taige Trent placed in both rounds and finished second in the average. She and Kyle were joined in the short round by goat-tier Elli Price, who finished fifth in the average.

The Northwestern rodeo was the final of four Central Plains rodeos in the fall portion of the season. The remaining six events will take place during the spring semester. The Rangers women finish the fall semester first in the regional standings; the men are fourth.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo
The Frank Phillips Lady Plainsmen defeated Ranger College, 73-58 Friday night here in Borger. Look...
The Borger Bulldogs boys basketball team beat Caprock in Amarillo Friday night, 76-63. Look for...
The Lady Plainsmen took care of business here in Borger against Wayland Baptist JV tonight, 107-33...

 

safe at second
Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes